Wheelbuilding 30 years ago

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dabac, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,
    For your entertainment, and perhaps as a remainder how things change and yet remain the same, I bring you link to a scanned-in copy of a book about wheelbuilding.

    Wheelbuilding instructions circa 1977

    If you're running low on pet peeves I believe it contains a few gems like "radial wheels ride harsher", and "tying and soldering makes wheels stiffer".
    There's also a rather intriguing comparison between the effects of long spokes and springboards...

    Enjoy!
     
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  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Stop laughing! I learned to build wheels using this book. All opinions aside, it is very informative and the wheel building instructions are accurate.
     
  3. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    That explains it. I'll keep this in mind in reference to all your future postings on wheelbuilding. ;)
     
  4. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Question for the wheel builders, how much has wheel building changed since 1977?
     
  5. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Well, the basics about how to lace and true ASO are the same. But the book also contains some old "truths" that are highly questionable if not simply untrue, like "radials ride harsher", "tying and soldering makes the wheel stiffer".

    The author is also amusingly confused about butted spokes. He mentions the tension imbalance in dished wheels as a problem, suggests using larger diameter spokes on the drive side and still sees butted spokes as a waste of money....

    Also some of his comparisons and analogies seems rather mis-directed to me.
     
  6. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    Hardly at all. Still spokes, rims, hubs. Still cross spokes(interleved), lubrication, good design. Some of us still see a use for tying and soldering and making the wheel 'stiffer' isn't one of them. What has changed is the numerous attempts to re-invent the bicycle wheel with all the paired spoke this, G-3 that, silly ways to hook a spoke to a rim of hub...along with all the 'claims' of how it will save this or that. The only way a wheel will have a BIG impact on your ride is if it fails somehow.

    IMHO, the best wheel is a conventional wheel, built exceptionally well. And my shop does that about 400 times per year, has for the last 8 years.
     
  7. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    I'm in the process of building a wheelset for personal use. I decided to go old school and use bees wax for spoke prep. I can tell you that it's a bit more labor intensive than Wheelsmith Spoke Prep and way more labor intensive than linseed oil. I'll let you know in about 6 months if I think the extra effort is worth it.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I concur.

    The sweetest wheels I've ever used was the set I laced up for my Gios 25 years ago--Campy Record low-flange, 32 butted spokes, 400g anodized Ambrosio tubular rims, 3-cross in the back and 2-cross in front. Shod with made-in-Italy Vittoria Corsa CXs. You youngsters don't know what you're missing.
     
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