Wheelbuilding: Fine Adjustments Difficult!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bc Drums, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Bc Drums

    Bc Drums Guest

    I have built a new front wheel using 36 hole Ultegra hub, Mavic Open Pro rim and DT double butted
    spokes. I have it trued up to a point, but now it seems that I can no longer make fine enough
    adjustments to the spokes to bring the wheel to dead flat.

    I oiled the spoke threads & nipples when I laced the wheel, and I think the wheel is pretty tight. I
    have been stress relieving with the squeeze method. The wheel is at the point where I get a lot of
    spoke twist when I turn the wrench, making a fine adjustment difficult. Any hints?

    By the way, I have enjoyed building the wheel, and I'd like to try it again and get better at it,
    but I don't need any more wheels. How do people who are not building commercially get a volume of
    experience?

    BC
     
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  2. > I oiled the spoke threads & nipples when I laced the wheel, and I think the wheel is pretty tight.
    > I have been stress relieving with the squeeze method. The wheel is at the point where I get a lot
    > of spoke twist when I turn the wrench, making a fine adjustment difficult. Any hints?

    If you're truing it in a bicycle frame or very solid wheel stand, pull the rim toward the frame (in
    the direction of the spoke you want to tighten). This will make it much easier to tighten the
    particular spoke, since it reduces tension on it.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    anonymous writes shyly:

    > I have built a new front wheel using 36 hole Ultegra hub, Mavic Open Pro rim and DT double butted
    > spokes. I have it trued up to a point, but now it seems that I can no longer make fine enough
    > adjustments to the spokes to bring the wheel to dead flat.

    If the wheel no longer responds properly then you may have the spokes TOO tight. This would become
    obvious if you stress relieved the spokes. Do this carefully lest you ruin your rim.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  4. I'm assuming you haven't overtightened the spokes (which I can't tell by a NG post).

    Eventually, you are going to reach a point in trueing when even the finest adjustment won't get the
    rim any straighter. This is, of course, the point where you begin measuring the variations in the
    surface of the rim itself, which is usually extruded from a die. I found this to be about +/- .005"
    (5 thousandths of an inch) on a quality rim.

    These are almost aerospace tolerances. If you get that close, consider your rim true and pat
    yourself on the bach for a job well done.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. bcdrums-<< The wheel is at the point where I get a lot of spoke twist when I turn the wrench, making
    a fine adjustment difficult. Any hints?

    A'twist assist'-a tool that holds the spoke as ya turn the nipp or turning the nipp too far, backing
    it off and frequent tapping on the ground, edge first, to take windup out.

    << By the way, I have enjoyed building the wheel, and I'd like to try it again and get better at it,
    but I don't need any more wheels. How do people who are not building commercially get a volume of
    experience?

    I started building for my bike club, then part time in a shop...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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