Wheels out of true after one ride?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Rkfast, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Rkfast

    Rkfast Guest

    Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my favorite
    local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight
    bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of true
    already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have some
    imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I start
    thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots
    and Im going out of true.

    Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
     
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  2. RkFast wrote:
    >
    >
    > Is this normal???

    Nope.

    > Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few rides?

    Possibly, but if they were properly tensioned and stress relieved, they'd still be true. Bring 'em
    back and get 'em fixed.

    > Do I need to ligthen up?

    Not unless you bought totally unsuitable parts, like ultralight, low spoke count xc wheels that you
    plan on using for downhilling.

    Barry
     
  3. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to
    > disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of
    > true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have
    > some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I
    > start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few
    > roots and Im going out of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?

    Tell your wheel builder to fix his crappy workmanship or you're gonna lite him up!

    My mechanic re-built my rear with a used rim, 18 undersized spokes (at my request) and it's still
    rolling strong.
    --
    Slacker
     
  4. RkFast wrote:

    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to
    > disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of
    > true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have
    > some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I
    > start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few
    > roots and Im going out of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
    >
    >
    >
    no not normal, take em back to the builder, i'm sure he'll fixem. even the best wheel builders have
    a bad day every now and then/
     
  5. RkFast wrote:
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to
    > disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of
    > true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have
    > some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I
    > start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few
    > roots and Im going out of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?

    I build all my own. I'd say that I _might_ have to slightly re-true a wheel after it's first good
    hard bashing/ride. They never go out of what so badly the brake pad would rub But I'm a
    perfectionist......

    I've never put a dial indicator on my wheels (someday maybee I will just to see) but I'd wager they
    are +/- 0.005" when they come off the stand.
     
  6. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    RkFast wrote:
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to
    > disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of
    > true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have
    > some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I
    > start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few
    > roots and Im going out of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?

    No. Once I learned to stress relieve, evenly tension, and untwist spokes, my wheels rarely need
    touching up for several k miles.

    David
     
  7. "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it.
    [...]
    > Is this normal???

    Nope. Poor build.

    I had a punk in a bike shop try to pull this story on me with a (badly) hand-built wheel once. Told
    me it was perfectly normal for the spokes to come completely loose after one ride, and gave me a
    superbly snotty attitude when I refused to buy into his jive. "Oh," he says, "and how many wheels
    have _you_ built?" It was one of the major factors that led me to start building my own wheels.

    CC
     
  8. Rkfast

    Rkfast Guest

    Heres a follow up to the situation:

    Took the bike out again today and trashed the rim a bit. Nothing crazy, but put the bike through
    its paces.

    The wheel got worse.

    ENOUGH!!!

    Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess I
    cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it. But lets just say they werent laced
    in a way that's optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB. Something about the way the spokes were set up
    around the flange of the hub.

    The local shop is re-doing the rim.

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    were
    > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him.
    > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    go
    > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see
    > have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe
    > after I start thrashing them
    I
    > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out
    > of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
     
  9. Rkfast

    Rkfast Guest

    Heres a follow up to the situation:

    Took the bike out again today and trashed the rim a bit. Nothing crazy, but put the bike through
    its paces.

    The wheel got worse.

    ENOUGH!!!

    Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess I
    cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it. But lets just say they werent laced
    in a way that's optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB. Something about the way the spokes were set up
    around the flange of the hub.

    The local shop is re-doing the rim.

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    were
    > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him.
    > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    go
    > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see
    > have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe
    > after I start thrashing them
    I
    > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out
    > of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
     
  10. John G

    John G Guest

    RkFast wrote:
    > ENOUGH!!!

    indeed!

    > Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess
    > I cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it.

    There are two ways, the right way and the wrong way.

    > But lets just say they werent laced in a way that's optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB.
    > Something about the way the spokes were set up around the flange of the hub.

    What a load of b*llsh!t

    > The local shop is re-doing the rim.

    As well they should!
     
  11. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    John G <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RkFast wrote:
    >> ENOUGH!!!
    >
    >indeed!

    Amen brother John...

    >> Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess
    >> I cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it.
    >
    >There are two ways, the right way and the wrong way.

    I'd alter that to say there is the right way, a few other ways that work, but not as well - and a
    bunch that really don't work worth beans.

    >> But lets just say they werent laced in a way that's optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB.
    >> Something about the way the spokes were set up around the flange of the hub.
    >
    >What a load of b*llsh!t

    Sounds like it to me too - the one thing that could be happening that might not be ENTIRELY false
    would be if the outside spokes (head in) might not have been manually bent around the flange (could
    be one translation of the above). If you don't bend them after lacing but before tensioning, the
    wheel won't be quite as tight as it really should be.

    >> The local shop is re-doing the rim.
    >
    >As well they should!

    Yup - without a doubt.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  12. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes
    and
    > > off I went to my favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it.
    > [...]
    > > Is this normal???
    >
    > Nope. Poor build.
    >
    > I had a punk in a bike shop try to pull this story on me with a (badly) hand-built wheel once.
    > Told me it was perfectly normal for the spokes to come completely loose after one ride,

    That happened to me once, came out of true so bad it rubbed on the chainstay, haven't been back to
    that shop since.

    Chris

    and gave me a superbly
    > snotty attitude when I refused to buy into his jive. "Oh," he says, "and how many wheels have
    > _you_ built?" It was one of the major factors that led me to start building my own wheels.
    >
    > CC
     
  13. Cowpunk

    Cowpunk Guest

    I had the same thing happen with some Mavic 517's.

    On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 02:43:54 GMT, "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my favorite
    >local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight
    >bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    >him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of true
    >already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have some
    >imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I start
    >thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots
    >and Im going out of true.
    >
    >Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    >rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
     
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