Wheels

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by D Hall, Jun 26, 2003.

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  1. D Hall

    D Hall Guest

    Hi all,

    Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels. Is it that 'good'
    wheels simply last longer and stay true for longer, or are there also noticeable difference in
    handling/speed etc. I've been thinking of splashing out on some new ones for a while but can't work
    out whether it's particularly worth
    it.

    Thanks in advance,

    Darren.
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    D Hall wrote:

    > Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels. Is it that
    > 'good' wheels simply last longer and stay true for longer, or are there also noticeable difference
    > in handling/speed etc.

    A perfectly true wheel will run better than one that isn't, of course!

    Beyond that, better wheels will have better components which should help the performance. Better
    materials will make a better rim/spoke set lighter for the same strength, and better bearings will
    make better hubs run better (and for longer).

    Quite where you put in along the steepening curve of the Law of Diminishing Returns will depend on
    pocket depth and use. There really isn't any point spending hundreds on wheels for a grotty hack
    bike, as you'd be better off spreading your budget more evenly. As with complete bikes, you can get
    a very respectable, competent product for a relatively small amount of money. But you can get a
    better one for more, and though bangs/buck is a useful measure of value for money, if you've got the
    bucks and want more bang then it's just a case of deciding what the bank balance will take while not
    spending an amount out of proportion with the rest of the bike.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Msa

    Msa Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > D Hall wrote:
    >
    > > Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels. Is it that
    > > 'good' wheels simply last longer and stay true for longer, or are there also noticeable
    > > difference in handling/speed etc.

    There are 2 definitions of good wheels. Those that are high quality and good, those that just
    look good.

    Some low spoke count, high rim depth will cost a lot of money (at least those of low weight),
    but the quality of hubs etc. may be debatable. On the other hand, something such as Mavic Open
    Pros built on Chorus or Record Hubs will be of excellent quality and last maybe 'a lifetime',
    but look standard.

    Whatever rocks ya boat! I couldn't make my mind up so I use the latter for training and the former
    for racing :)

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    D Hall wrote:
    > Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels. Is it that
    > 'good' wheels simply last longer and stay true for longer, or are there also noticeable difference
    > in handling/speed etc. I've been thinking of splashing out on some new ones for a while but can't
    > work out whether it's particularly worth
    > it.

    It is sometimes claimed that some wheels are better than others because they're "stiffer" (for
    better acceleration) or "more comfortable" (??). I've got my doubts about these factors but keep an
    open mind mainly because I haven't ridden any really top end fancy wheels yet.

    The more major factors are:

    1) Stength and reliability - from good choice of components and quality of build (correct & even
    tension, stress relieved, etc).

    2) Weight - as well as hubs & rims, choice of spokes can make a difference.

    3) Aerodynamics - deep rim and low spoke count or bladed spokes will reduce drag at high speed.

    ~PB
     
  5. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 26 Jun 2003 07:02:57 -0700, [email protected] (D Hall) wrote:

    >Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels.

    Good ones don't break.

    Really good ones use light bits, and still don't break.

    If you get them muddy, then hubs that are well sealed are worth having.
     
  6. "MSA" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On the other hand, something such as Mavic Open Pros built on Chorus or Record Hubs will be of
    > excellent quality and last maybe 'a lifetime', but look standard.

    Agreed - an Open Pro/high-end hub combo will, if well-built, give a durable, long-lasting wheelset.
    Use the right number/type of spokes and you can actually make them lighter than a pair of flash
    factory-built wheels like Mavic Ksyriums - I think the Sapim Laser is the usual spoke of choice in
    this respect (see, for example, Oldham Cycle Centre's ads in CW). The Open Pro-based wheels will
    also have the advantage of being more easily serviced if they do go wrong.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  7. Msa

    Msa Guest

    "Andy Dingley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 26 Jun 2003 07:02:57 -0700, [email protected] (D Hall) wrote:
    >
    > >Could someone please explain the difference between a good and bad pair of wheels.
    >
    > Good ones don't break.
    >
    > Really good ones use light bits, and still don't break.
    >
    >
    > If you get them muddy, then hubs that are well sealed are worth having.
    >

    If anyone's interested in a Campag/Open Pro set check out Ribbles. I bought a set built on Record
    for £179 inc. a pair of wheel bags. Bloody well built too. Don't think you'll find cheaper.

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
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