Wheelsets

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Scott2468, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. Scott2468

    Scott2468 Member

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    Hi,

    I commute on my Giant 03 TCR 70kms each day. It is original so it still has Shimano R540 wheels on it.

    I am happy to be riding on these. What I mean, they stay true, ride OK, don't hold me back. BUT they are driving me crazy with breaking spokes! I have had enough. I think its a combination of low spoke count, poor road surfaces, steel spokes and "elbow?" spoke design that is causing this.

    I have broken three spokes so far this year. I lost count how many last year. Not only is it a pain, its a little scary limping home hoping another does not break and the whole wheel collapse.

    So, I would love to know your opinion on what to get and why.

    Here are the mandatory requirements.

    The set must be under $1000.
    Durability is more important than performance.
    That being said, performance would be nice. [​IMG]
    Still ride OK with one spoke gone (so I guess a high spoke count)
    I weigh 68kg (150 lb). I ride between 350-500kms (220-310 miles) per week.

    Thanks,

    Scott
     
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  2. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    Get in touch with Greg from Two Wheel Enterprises in Sydney. Give him a call, or drop by; emails can go un-answered for a little while. Explain your problem, explain what you want and he'll custom build you something that will be what you need.

    Never heard a bad thing about his wheels.
     
  3. macaj

    macaj New Member

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    Hi Scott,

    If there is nothing wrong with the hubs and rims it is possible to get the wheel rebuilt with new spokes and nipples. By getting a rebuild of your wheels, the mechanic can tension up the spokes little by little and get the tension just right. this will stop one (or a small group) of spokes getting more fatigued than others which is what i believe is happening with your wheelset.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Suggest you have a pair of conventional 32 spoke wheels built for you. With good hubs and rims, properly built, you should get many thousands of miles of trouble-free riding before you need to touch them. And if they do start breaking spokes after 20K miles, you can have them rebuilt and start again for minimal cost.

    The Ultegra hub and Velocity Aerohead rim are a popular combination with LBS builders here, but there are plenty of choices depending on how much you want to spend. I'll bet in Syndey there are several good builders who can solve your wheel problems.
     
  5. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    Hence my recommendation for TWE.
     
  6. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    "I am happy to be riding on these. What I mean, they stay true, ride OK, don't hold me back. BUT they are driving me crazy with breaking spokes! I have had enough. I think its a combination of low spoke count, poor road surfaces, steel spokes and "elbow?" spoke design that is causing this."

    How can you be happy with wheels that break spokes, go outta true and don't ride OK?

    Breaking spokes means the rim is sick.

    NOT j bend spoke issues.

    Find a decent wheelbuilder that will design a wheelset specifically for you and your needs. Like Campagnolo, shimano or DT hubs, DT, Velocity or Mavic rims(or others), DT or Sapm spokes, built well. These will weigh less than the 540s, NOT break spokes and cost about 1/2 to 2/3 of $1000.
     
  7. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    When wheels break spokes, it isn't the spoke's that are at fault but the rim. Aluminum rims get deformed, the spoke tension gets erratic and spokes break. Like a coat hanger that you bend back and forth and back and forth..break.
     
  8. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    This is not always true. When an inexperienced person arms himself with a spoke wrench and sets to work on "truing" wheels, the spoke tensions can slowly get very uneven, with the rim remaining unbent. I know because I did this myself when I first start messing about with wheels. When I despaired and unlaced the wheel, the rim was left straight and round (unexpectedly) and ready to be rebuilt.
     
  9. freeagent35

    freeagent35 New Member

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    Personally, I think that the Mavic Ksyrium Elites are probably your best bet. Inexpensive, quite aero, and very tough. I have these and a pair of the lighter SSC SLs. The SLs are harsh (aluminum vs. steel spokes) but have proven VERY durable over 4 years. They never creak or squeek, and the bearings are smooth as silk after thousands of miles (mostly dry weather). There are plenty of good wheels out there, but the combination of bearing quality, light weight, cost, road feel (generally; remember that SLs are harsh so I would personally not right them on an all aluminum frame) and durability, they would be my overall pick.
     
  10. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    7 years ago when I bought my first "real" road bike I opted for a set of 540's over the stock ultegra open pro's. What a huge mistake. I thought they looked cool and fast, but found them to break spokes all the time and they were heavy and flexible. Overall I think Shimano's wheelsets are ok, but the 540's were awful. When the spokes broke little pieces would break off inside the rim and rattle around. I'm a campy guy now, but also a huge fan of handbuilts for all applications. If I was building a set for commuting I'd go Centaur hubs (or Ultegra) with Velocity Fusion rims. Throw in some 26-28mm tires and potholes be damned.
     
  11. macaj

    macaj New Member

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    Thankyou! i knew that Peter had a point but my point was also valid!
     
  12. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    For the same price as Mavic Elite's or SL's you can get vastly better custom build wheels at lighter weight, more serviceable and longer use life.
     
  13. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    MUCH better hubs as well, particularly the rear.
     
  14. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    For durability, you can't beat a good custom built wheel. And if you want truly durable, a clydesdale can ride a wheelset built with Velocity Deep V rims with 36 spokes laced 3x and not have a problem for thousands of miles... I have also heard that as far as banng for buck, Shimano hubs are good. Ultegra hubs are often suggested for a durable build.

    A nice set of wheels built with Velocity Deep V rims, Ultegra hubs and 36 quality spokes laced 3x will be less than $1,000 and will be pretty bomb proof.

    As for performance? They might not be a climbing wheel, but they are pretty aero. ;)
     
  15. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    I don't get the hard-on that you seppo's have for Velocity rims. They are so cheap and nasty. If you want Deep-V buy the DT Swiss R1.2. If you want a shallow section, buy Mavic Open Pro or DT Swiss R1.1.
     
  16. Thylacine

    Thylacine Member

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    Hope Pro 2 hubs laced to DT RR1.1 rims would be the way to go. If you want durability, go 36 spokes instead of 32. If faux aero is your thing, get the deeper DT rims.

    You could pick this up from CRC for under 600.
     
  17. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    I have a wheelset made with 1.2 rims. VERY nice rims but I also have built with lots of Deep Vs, Fusions, CXP-33..all nice and all about the same $. The only rim that Mavic can't seem to fix the 'click' at the seam is OpenPro. My last choice of any rim.
     
  18. dkrenik

    dkrenik Member

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    Interesting. I've a rear wheel (DT240s/Sapim CX-Rays/Velocity Aerohead) that I've had enormous difficulty in keeping true. I've been considering going to the Aerohead O/C.

    Do you have similar misgivings about the Aeroheads as you do with Mavic's Open Pro?

    Dave
     
  19. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    No BUT the Aerohead and OC are very light rims, plus the X-Rays are thin spokes. That coupled with low spoke count, that combo may not the best mix for you and your riding style. It may mean an unreliable wheel. Add a poor build and bob's your uncle.
     
  20. dkrenik

    dkrenik Member

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    Thanks Pete. I appreciate your insight. I guess I didn't consider ~420g to be light weight. I'm ~175-180 lbs and am running 28 hole (2x) rear; 24 (radial) for the front (I haven't considered that a low spoke count as well). My LBS mentioned that the Aerohead rims didn't seem to be quite as true out of the box as other rims they've had.

    Might be time to try something more substantial?

    Dave
     
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