When do you use your tri-bike for everyday rides?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Michael Emerald, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. Hi. I live in New England and do a lot of cycling with
    cyclists, in groups as large as 12 and as small as 3, on
    roads that are open and scenic, and on roads that are more
    highly trafficked. Question is, when should I be using my
    aero-bar equipped bike, versus my normal road bike? My tri-
    bike is actually a road bike, but the seat is slightly
    angled and I lose the top of the bar, so it should be used
    primarily in aero position. As you can tell, I'm new to the
    sport, though I can sit comfortably in a tuck for awhile. My
    considerations are traffic, the group's safety, etc. How do
    you handle this question yourself?

    Thanks, Michael
     
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  2. Chronofish

    Chronofish Guest

    "Michael Emerald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi. I live in New England and do a lot of cycling with
    > cyclists, in groups as large as 12 and as small as 3, on
    > roads that are open and scenic, and on roads that are more
    > highly trafficked. Question is, when should I be using my
    > aero-bar equipped bike, versus my normal road bike? My tri-
    > bike is actually a road bike, but the seat is slightly
    > angled and I lose the top of the bar, so it should be used
    > primarily in aero position. As you can tell, I'm new to
    > the sport, though I can sit comfortably in a tuck for
    > awhile. My considerations are traffic, the group's safety,
    > etc. How do you handle this question yourself?
    >
    > Thanks, Michael

    Personally I am not fortunate enough to own more than one
    bike - so my tri configured bike is it.

    Rodies will give you hell, but if you don't go down on your
    aerobars during a group ride it shouldn't matter. However
    if you want to practice your aero position - get away from
    the group.

    Same with traffic. I too ride here in New England (Rhode
    Island) and you don't want/need to be aero where there is
    car congestion. I ride a great deal in western Rhode
    Island where you're more likely to get hit by a squirrel
    than a car.

    The way that I handle it is that I train for TT which means
    I do a lot of riding by myself. I have selected several
    routes that have shoulders and/or have minimal traffic and
    especially minimal traffic lights and stop signs.

    -CF
     
  3. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "ChronoFish" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Rodies will give you hell, but if you don't go down on your
    >aerobars during a group ride it shouldn't matter.

    Actually, they probably won't "give you hell" unless you DO
    go to the aerobars. On the rides I've been on the roadies
    might look at you a little sideways until you prove you're
    not suicidal.

    FWIW, I did see a young lady doing the Tour de Tucson a year
    ago - riding in the middle of the pack on the aerobars. She
    made it nearly 95 miles before she finally went down
    (luckily didn't take any innocents down with her foolish
    self). ;-)

    > However if you want to practice your aero position - get
    > away from the group.

    Yeah, go off the front... (they like a rabbit). ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of
    the $695 ti frame
     
  4. Nicole

    Nicole Guest

    Sorry but I'm very new at this, what's the difference
    between aero and normal? I mean I know what the actual
    positions are but what's so bad about riding aero that
    "roadies" will give you hell for? Right now I ride on my
    dad's racing bike but he doesn't have aero bars but whenever
    I go somewhere, I generally see most of the cyclists with
    aero bars.

    Thanks! Nicole
     
  5. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 5/10/04 9:13 PM, in article [email protected], wrote:

    > Sorry but I'm very new at this, what's the difference
    > between aero and normal? I mean I know what the actual
    > positions are but what's so bad about riding aero that
    > "roadies" will give you hell for? Right now I ride on my
    > dad's racing bike but he doesn't have aero bars but
    > whenever I go somewhere, I generally see most of the
    > cyclists with aero bars.
    >
    > Thanks! Nicole

    Nichole,

    I'll refrain from commenting on why roadies make fun of
    triathletes in general since it would require its own
    newsgroup...

    As far as aero goes; "being aero" refers to any time your
    elbows are planted on your aero bars. Roadies will give you
    hell for doing this (rightfully so) because when your arms
    are in aerobars it usually means that your hands are not
    within reach of the brakes. Having a rider without brakes is
    generally considered bad in a crowd of cyclists.

    Do the cycling world a favor and limit your "going aero" to
    events where rules against drafting are in effect (meaning
    there is supposed to be space between cyclists) or when you
    are training alone. If you insist on "going aero" while in a
    pack of riders, make sure you know them REALLY well and ask
    them first if they don't mind losing skin on your behalf.

    John
     
  6. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 5/10/04 9:32 PM, in article BCC5A56C.6C42%[email protected], "John
    Hardt" wrote:

    > On 5/10/04 9:13 PM, in article [email protected]
    > int.gatech.edu, wrote:
    >
    >> Sorry but I'm very new at this, what's the difference
    >> between aero and normal? I mean I know what the actual
    >> positions are but what's so bad about riding aero that
    >> "roadies" will give you hell for? Right now I ride on my
    >> dad's racing bike but he doesn't have aero bars but
    >> whenever I go somewhere, I generally see most of the
    >> cyclists with aero bars.
    >>
    >> Thanks! Nicole
    >
    > Nichole,
    >

    Oops. Apologies for butchering your name.
     
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