When is a century not a century?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Matabala, Aug 15, 2003.

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  1. Matabala

    Matabala Guest

    All this talk about the mythic "century" begs the question. Does it really count if you're stopping
    on 2/3/4 occasions for more time than it takes for a quick piss?
     
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  2. Carl Sundquist

    Carl Sundquist New Member

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    Since this is not a racing pertinant question, why are you posting it on this NG?
     
  3. Dashi Toshii

    Dashi Toshii Guest

    "matabala" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > All this talk about the mythic "century" begs the question. Does it
    really
    > count if you're stopping on 2/3/4 occasions for more time than it takes
    for
    > a quick piss?

    A "century" is only a 100 mile bike ride, nothing "mythic" about it.

    You should be doing one at least once a month, just to get the miles in.

    Doesn't need to be an organized century, just do 100 miles on a training ride.

    Dashii
     
  4. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Carl Sundquist
    <usene[email protected]> wrote:

    > Matabala wrote:
    > > All this talk about the mythic "century" begs the question. Does it really count if you're
    > > stopping on 2/3/4 occasions for more time than it takes for a quick piss?
    >
    >
    >
    > Since this is not a racing pertinant question, why are you posting it on this NG?
    >
    Well, a certain never-doped poster did mention "winning a more than a dozen centuries" recently,
    so it could have something to do with that. Win!!! a Century! and other valuable prizes! (Sorry,
    Tennessee...)

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "Better a lapdog for a slip of a girl than a ... git." Blackadder

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  5. "Dashi Toshii" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "matabala" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > All this talk about the mythic "century" begs the question. Does it
    > really
    > > count if you're stopping on 2/3/4 occasions for more time than it takes
    > for
    > > a quick piss?
    >
    > A "century" is only a 100 mile bike ride, nothing "mythic" about it.
    >
    > You should be doing one at least once a month, just to get the miles in.
    >
    > Doesn't need to be an organized century, just do 100 miles on a training ride.

    No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that when they could ride the same
    public roads for free.
     
  6. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Dashi Toshii" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "matabala" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > All this talk about the mythic "century" begs the question. Does it
    > really
    > > count if you're stopping on 2/3/4 occasions for more time than it takes
    > for
    > > a quick piss?
    >
    > A "century" is only a 100 mile bike ride, nothing "mythic" about it.
    >
    > You should be doing one at least once a month, just to get the miles in.
    >
    > Doesn't need to be an organized century, just do 100 miles on a training ride.
    >
    > Dashii

    For cyclists just getting "serious" the first century ride is a milestone of some "mythic"
    proportion. The double century is, IMO, more of a true cyclist's milestone or benchmark. Both can of
    course be done alone or with a small group of friends. But it's also fun to do it as part of an
    organized century event. I have fond memories of the Katy Flatland century in Texas. And you never
    know, there might be belly dancers at the finish----that's mythic.
     
  7. "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:H1q%[email protected]...
    >
    > For cyclists just getting "serious" the first century ride is a milestone
    of
    > some "mythic" proportion. The double century is, IMO, more of a true cyclist's milestone or
    > benchmark. Both can of course be done alone or
    with
    > a small group of friends. But it's also fun to do it as part of an organized century event. I have
    > fond memories of the Katy Flatland
    century
    > in Texas. And you never know, there might be belly dancers at the finish----that's mythic.

    Damn.

    With events like the Katy Flatland Century under your belt, it's no wonder you think the TdF is no
    longer epic.
     
  8. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:

    > No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that when they could ride the
    > same public roads for free.

    The regular rest stops, well stocked with sunscreen, food and drink, and their obvious invitation to
    rest up a spell, are worth it to me. When I go for a training ride, I tend to ride farther between
    stops (sometimes no stops at all for 60 miles), skimp on the re-fuels, and therefore end up riding
    slower and hurting more afterwards.

    Perhaps I should think about changing my approach to training rides.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  9. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 12:17:26 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >
    >> No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that when they could ride the
    >> same public roads for free.
    >
    > The regular rest stops, well stocked with sunscreen, food and drink, and their obvious invitation
    > to rest up a spell, are worth it to me. When I go for a training ride, I tend to ride farther
    > between stops (sometimes no stops at all for 60 miles), skimp on the re-fuels, and therefore end
    > up riding slower and hurting more afterwards.
    >
    > Perhaps I should think about changing my approach to training rides.
    >

    Plus, you might get to meet other people. I've joined a few clubs, but the rides are generally far
    from where I live, and I'm training a lot (for me). A ride you pay for will have other people to
    meet. I've signed up for two so far this year.

    --
    Bob M in CT remove 'x.' to reply
     
  10. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Raptor wrote:
    >
    > Perhaps I should think about changing my approach to training rides.
    >
    Like carrying food and drink with you?
     
  11. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    -)

    "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Gps%[email protected]...
    >
    > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:H1q%[email protected]...
    > >
    > > For cyclists just getting "serious" the first century ride is a
    milestone
    > of
    > > some "mythic" proportion. The double century is, IMO, more of a true cyclist's milestone or
    > > benchmark. Both can of course be done alone or
    > with
    > > a small group of friends. But it's also fun to do it as part of an organized century event. I
    > > have fond memories of the Katy Flatland
    > century
    > > in Texas. And you never know, there might be belly dancers at the finish----that's mythic.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Damn.
    >
    >
    > With events like the Katy Flatland Century under your belt, it's no wonder you think the TdF is no
    > longer epic.
     
  12. "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:x%k%[email protected]:

    <snip>

    > No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that when they could ride the
    > same public roads for free.

    That's why I don't pay. I jump in the pack a few miles after the start. Of course, I bring my own
    food/drinks, so as not to cause any expense to the organizers.

    - Boyd S.
     
  13. Howard Kveck <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    <snip>

    > Well, a certain never-doped poster did mention "winning a more than a dozen centuries"
    > recently, so it could have something to do with that. Win!!! a Century! and other valuable
    > prizes! (Sorry, Tennessee...)

    So what was the prize when Never-Doped "won" a century? A cookie, a pickle, or a button?

    - Boyd S.
     
  14. Kurgan Gringioni <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Doesn't need to be an organized century, just do 100 miles on a training ride.

    > No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that when they could ride the
    > same public roads for free.

    Some people need the event to provide motivation. Or they like it as a social event. Or chowing down
    at the rest stops. Or, for the less self-sufficient, they need the reassurance of knowing there are
    other riders and sag vehicles out there. Finally, they may just want to show off their Primal Wear
    jerseys. (So _that's_ who buys all those Primal Wear jerseys!)

    It's not really my scene, but for the average club that puts on a century, it could be their biggest
    fund raiser of the year, so it's a good thing that people want to do them.
     
  15. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Sometimes it's worth the fee for the food. The Baton Rouge Bicycle Club's Jambalaya Tours in
    November is well worth the cost for the food and the riding is some of the best in Louisiana.

    Your turn, Henry. :)

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:x%k%[email protected]:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > No shit. I could never figure out why people would pay $$$ to do that
    when
    > > they could ride the same public roads for free.
    >
    > That's why I don't pay. I jump in the pack a few miles after the start. Of course, I bring my own
    > food/drinks, so as not to cause any expense to
    the
    > organizers.
    >
    > - Boyd S.
     
  16. Fred Marx

    Fred Marx Guest

    uuhhhh maybe when it's a metric?
     
  17. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Boyd Speerschneider <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Howard Kveck <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Well, a certain never-doped poster did mention "winning a more than a dozen centuries"
    > > recently, so it could have something to do with that. Win!!! a Century! and other valuable
    > > prizes! (Sorry, Tennessee...)
    >
    > So what was the prize when Never-Doped "won" a century? A cookie, a pickle, or a button?
    >
    > - Boyd S.

    A Happy Meal?

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "Better a lapdog for a slip of a girl than a ... git." Blackadder

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  18. "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:OPy%[email protected]...
    > Sometimes it's worth the fee for the food. The Baton Rouge Bicycle Club's Jambalaya Tours in
    > November is well worth the cost for the food and the riding is some of the best in Louisiana.
    >
    > Your turn, Henry. :)

    Don't have a whole lot to add.

    I don't like eating a lot in the middle of a long ride. Food coma sets in (blood rushing to the
    stomach) and I wish I was home taking a nap instead of sitting on my bike.
     
  19. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Kyle Legate wrote:
    > Raptor wrote:
    >
    >>Perhaps I should think about changing my approach to training rides.
    >>
    >
    > Like carrying food and drink with you?

    I seem to need a lot more than I carry to perform well. If I'm on a supported century ride, I
    eat-eat-eat and drink-drink-drink, and feel pretty strong in the last few miles of it. The
    alternative on a training ride is to hit several convenience stores on the way.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  20. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Raptor wrote:
    > Kyle Legate wrote:
    >> Raptor wrote:
    >>
    >>> Perhaps I should think about changing my approach to training rides.
    >>>
    >>
    >> Like carrying food and drink with you?
    >
    > I seem to need a lot more than I carry to perform well. If I'm on a supported century ride, I
    > eat-eat-eat and drink-drink-drink, and feel pretty strong in the last few miles of it. The
    > alternative on a training ride is to hit several convenience stores on the way.
    >
    Generally, when I'm a long ride I bring calorie-dense foods with me...a piece of fruit to mark the
    end of the first hour, dried fruit, cookies and energy bars or gels for the rest of the ride. In the
    summer, 3 bottles, two with cytomax and one with water. When I run low on fluid I hit a variety
    store for a large bottle of water, top up my water bottles and chug back the rest. If the cytomax
    went early and I'm running low on food I'll consider mixing a gatorade with the water to keep the
    salt up and prevent cramps. That's sufficient for me. After the ride, the usual post ride feed and
    in the summer I always have a bottle of water by my side. Make sure you're fully fueled before the
    start (a meal a couple of hours before and pee as clear as you can) and you'll be able to handle a
    slight deficit on the ride.
     
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