When the recipe doesn't say what to do with an ingredient...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Father Ignatius, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).

    What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?

    Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say what
    to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish, or what?


    Thanks in advance

    --
    Nat


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE


    Recipe By : GREAT CHEFS
    Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Mousses Frisco
    M


    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 cup Sugar
    1/2 cup Water
    8 large Egg whites
    6 large Egg yolks
    1 Tbsp Rum, white
    1 lb Chocolate, white, melted
    Creme fraiche
    Raspberry puree


    In a saucepan, heat the sugar and water until the mixture forms a
    soft ball. Put the egg whites in the bowl of a mixer, and beat
    them until medium stiff (beating first on medium, then on high).
    Add the sugar and water (soft ball stage) from the saucepan to the egg
    whites and continue to beat briefly until a stiff meringue is formed.
    Place the egg yolks in a metal bowl and beat them over heat with a
    whisk. Add rum to the egg yolks - still beating over heat. Fold the egg
    yolks into the egg whites. Fold the melted chocolate into the egg
    mixture. Refrigerate for 3 to 4 hours. Source: Great Chefs of
    San Francisco, Avon Books, 1984 Chef: Masataka Kobayashi,
    Masa's, Vintage Court Hotel, : San Francisco, CA


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Father Ignatius" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    > http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).
    >
    > What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?
    >
    > Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say what
    > to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish, or what?
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    > --
    > Nat
    >

    (recipe omitting instruction on what to do with last two ingredients
    snipped for brevity)
    >
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    I don't know that it's "understood" that ingredients named but not
    'used' in the preparation are to be seen as garnishes, but it seems
    appropriate here, especially since the rest of the recipe is reasonably
    "well written," at least to the extent that the ingredients are listed
    in the order in which they are used and named in the "method" portion of
    the recipe,

    What I would "understand" is that the recipe is poorly written and my
    educated guess is that specifics got lost in the translation from paper
    text to electronic. I've done that kind of truncating myself when I key
    a recipe -- what I wind up makes sense to me but might not always make
    sense to anyone else who might read it down the way. If this is how the
    recipe appeared in the paper text, it was a poor proofreading job. And
    whoever posted it didn't check it for completeness, (If I were editing
    I'd want to include the size container in which the recipe should be
    chilled -- is it molded, poured to individual serving cups? That kind
    of stuff.)

    My $.50 worth.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 2-10-2006, How Much is Enough?
     
  3. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    Father Ignatius wrote:

    > What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?


    I am with Barb on this one: I think the recipe was not "checked" before
    publishing: but see this one, it might help...

    -= Exported from BigOven =-

    White Chocolate Mousse

    Recipe By:
    Serving Size: 1
    Cuisine: Uncategorized
    Main Ingredient: Chocolate
    Categories: Cream, Chocolate

    -= Ingredients =-
    10 ounces White chocolate
    1/2 cup Hot water
    2 1/2 cups Heavy cream
    3 Egg whites
    2 teaspoons Sugar
    2 tablespoons Grand Marnier or cherry

    -= Instructions =-
    Melt chocolate in double boiler. Whisk vigorously while gradually
    adding hot water to obtain a smooth paste. Whisk in liqueur or
    flavoring and remove from heat. Whip cream until it holds soft peaks;
    fold into chocolate mixture and stir only until well mixed. In a
    separate bowl, beat egg whites until they are foamy and carefully fold
    in the chocolate mixture so that it remains fluffy. Chill and serve in
    individual dishes. If prepared for Valentines Day it would look
    scrumptious served with some red berries. Note: Prepare White
    Chocolate Mousse no more than three or four hours before serving.
     
  4. "Father Ignatius" <[email protected]> hitched up their
    panties and posted news:[email protected]:

    > I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    > http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).
    >
    > What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?
    >
    > Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say
    > what to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish,
    > or what?
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >


    I'm not sure your thoughts on non included ingredients are correct but in
    this case you are correct <G>. The Creme fraiche and Raspberry puree could
    most definitely be use as a garnish.

    To me, a recipe that does not state what to do with an ingredient is
    usually an error the person makes. I've made many errors myself,
    especially when using Mastercook ;)

    Michael

    --
    “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun.”
    _Ray Kroc, creator of the McDonald's franchise
     
  5. Thank you for this, but (referring to the last sentence in the recipe below)
    what happens if you prepare White Chocolate Mousse more than three or four
    hours before serving?

    (I just put a batch in the reefer for tomorrow, so I really wanna know.)


    > White Chocolate Mousse
    >
    > Recipe By:
    > Serving Size: 1
    > Cuisine: Uncategorized
    > Main Ingredient: Chocolate
    > Categories: Cream, Chocolate
    >
    > -= Ingredients =-
    > 10 ounces White chocolate
    > 1/2 cup Hot water
    > 2 1/2 cups Heavy cream
    > 3 Egg whites
    > 2 teaspoons Sugar
    > 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier or cherry
    >
    > -= Instructions =-
    > Melt chocolate in double boiler. Whisk vigorously while gradually
    > adding hot water to obtain a smooth paste. Whisk in liqueur or
    > flavoring and remove from heat. Whip cream until it holds soft peaks;
    > fold into chocolate mixture and stir only until well mixed. In a
    > separate bowl, beat egg whites until they are foamy and carefully fold
    > in the chocolate mixture so that it remains fluffy. Chill and serve in
    > individual dishes. If prepared for Valentines Day it would look
    > scrumptious served with some red berries. Note: Prepare White
    > Chocolate Mousse no more than three or four hours before serving.
     
  6. Switch

    Switch Guest

    cathyxyz wrote:
    > White Chocolate Mousse
    >
    > Recipe By:


    > -= Instructions =-
    > Melt chocolate in double boiler. Whisk vigorously while gradually
    > adding hot water to obtain a smooth paste. Whisk in liqueur or
    > flavoring and remove from heat. Whip cream until it holds soft peaks;
    > fold into chocolate mixture and stir only until well mixed.


    I have made choc mousse, I put heavy cream in a large bowl, I set that
    bowl into a bowl of ice while I whip it and it stiffens..meanwhile I am
    melting genache...after the genache is melted (but not hot)...

    I slowly stirred the genache into the cold stiffening cream...(still
    keeping the bowl on ice until all the chocolate is blended in. whip
    till fluffy and firm...of course, if you whip it too much it breaks
    down and spoils the whole mix...
     
  7. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    Father Ignatius wrote:
    > Thank you for this, but (referring to the last sentence in the recipe below)
    > what happens if you prepare White Chocolate Mousse more than three or four
    > hours before serving?
    >
    > (I just put a batch in the reefer for tomorrow, so I really wanna know.)


    I would guess it just has better "texture" if you eat it as soon as
    possible.

    Hope it comes out okay.

    Cheers
    Cathy(xyz)
     
  8. sf

    sf Guest

    Since there are no amounts included with the creme fraiche and
    rasberry puree and they are not used in the actual recipe, they are
    implied as a "garnish". Please correct your MC entry to indicate it
    for future reference.

    ``````````````````````````````````

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 13:51:17 +0200, Father Ignatius wrote:

    > I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    > http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).
    >
    > What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?
    >
    > Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say what
    > to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish, or what?
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > --
    > Nat
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
    >
    >
    > Recipe By : GREAT CHEFS
    > Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Mousses Frisco
    > M
    >
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 cup Sugar
    > 1/2 cup Water
    > 8 large Egg whites
    > 6 large Egg yolks
    > 1 Tbsp Rum, white
    > 1 lb Chocolate, white, melted
    > Creme fraiche
    > Raspberry puree


    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  9. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Father Ignatius <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    > http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).
    >
    > What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?
    >
    > Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say what
    > to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish, or what?


    I don't know that it is necessarily the convention, but in this case you
    are right. See the full recipe at
    <http://www.recipesource.com/desserts/mousse/wc-mousse2.html>.

    Victor
     
  10. On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 16:48:28 +0200, "Father Ignatius"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thank you for this, but (referring to the last sentence in the recipe below)
    >what happens if you prepare White Chocolate Mousse more than three or four
    >hours before serving?
    >
    >(I just put a batch in the reefer for tomorrow, so I really wanna know.)


    You did not, I see, inquire as to which wines go with it.

    --
    -denny-
    "Do your thoughts call ahead or do they just arrive at your mouth unannounced?"

    "It's come as you are, baby."

    -over the hedge
     
  11. On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 13:51:17 +0200, "Father Ignatius"
    <[email protected]> rummaged among random neurons
    and opined:

    >I was just over at rec.food.recipes, looking at the first recipe under
    >http://tinyurl.com/95s85 (see below).
    >
    >What do you do with the creme fraiche and the raspberry puree?
    >
    >Is it an understood cooking convention that, if the recipe doesn't say what
    >to do with an ingredient, then it's understood to be a garnish, or what?
    >
    >
    >Thanks in advance


    <snip recipe>

    My best guess is that the raspberry puree could be drizzled on the
    individual serving plate, a serving of mousse carefully put on the
    puree, then topped with the creme fraiche. Would make a pretty
    presentation.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
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