When the weather is too hot



Corzhens

Well-Known Member
May 26, 2015
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A few weeks back when there was a heat wave in Japan, I was saddened by the news report that a biker going to work collapsed on the road due to the extreme heat. That is a neat lesson for cyclists especially those living in tropical countries because heat stroke is prevalent here during summer. I can’t imagine the fatigue that a rider would endure particularly those traveling for long distances.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
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NE Indiana
I'm not sure how hot it was that day in Japan but I've ridden my bike in the Mojave Desert area of Southern California where in the summer the temps get over 100 degrees F.

I would also spray myself when I got too hot with water from my bottle, but I had to carry a Camelbak 70 ounce bag on my back.

Now they have these scarfs that you get wet and they will keep you about 5 to 8 degrees cooler by simply laying it around your neck, and they have the same type of thing you put on your head then put your helmet on, I haven't tried one of those yet.

I just had to make sure I stayed hydrated. I also found that loose fitting white colored clothing to works the best, then I found a jersey with a bunch of tiny holes that is the coolest jersey I have ever worn including a high tech $135 jersey, and the one I bought with the holes was just $12!
 

Alymae

New Member
Aug 5, 2018
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Cyclists should always bring a bottle of water whether it is hot or not. Usually cyclist here in my place travel early in the morning and only for short distances. It is not advisable for them to travel using bikes for a long distance. Better be safe than sorry.
 

jackmo120

New Member
Aug 30, 2018
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A few weeks back when there was a heat wave in Japan, I was saddened by the news report that a biker going to work collapsed on the road due to the extreme heat. That is a neat lesson for cyclists especially those living in tropical countries because heat stroke is prevalent here during summer. I can’t imagine the fatigue that a rider would endure particularly those traveling for long distances.
You're right. That's really sad.
 

reighn

Active Member
Feb 12, 2018
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That's why we should not use our bike during noon, or better to drink plenty of water and we should always bring an extra bottle of water.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
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NE Indiana
I forgot to mention a stunt I did and still do when I ride in heat. I will take 3 bottles with me and a small (can't recall the liter size, but it was the smallest they made) Camelbak; the day before the ride I would make up a pitcher of Gatorade and water and place in fridge, I would pour some of the Gatorade diluted 50% into a Polar bottle and stick it in the freezer along with 2 empty Polar bottles. The next day I would fill one of the empty now frozen bottles with as much ice as I can get in it and then fill with the chilled Gatorade, then fill the other empty frozen bottle with about half ice and fill it with Gatorade, fill my Camelbak with ice and pour chilled water in. The Camelbak would actually help keep my back a tad cool! Of course I would drink from the bottle with the least amount of ice first followed by the next one, and by the time I got to the frozen one it was very cold.

The coldness of a drink is important because it brings down your core body temperature. Some of you may be trying to figure out how I carried 3 bottles on a bike designed with for just 2, I simply installed one of these: https://www.amazon.com/Clamp-water-bottle-holder-mount/dp/B01EYDO9SM on the bottom of the down tube. There are other ways to get more bottles on your bike too, see: http://nordicgroup.us/cageboss/
 

Anna Adam

New Member
Jan 9, 2019
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During this much heat, cyclers should always keep themselves hydrated. They should keep a water bottle alongside other accessories that keep them cooler than the temperature such as UV protection cooling scarves and arm wrists, etc. All these things can help in keeping oneself hydrated during cycling, hope it helps.
 

john wick

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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Heatstroke is very dangerous for human and also on the animal because of nobody survives.
 

BikeCommuteAdvocate

New Member
Aug 5, 2019
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I try to bike in the morning, but if it gets too hot it's hard to come back in the afternoon. I bring a change of clothes to change into basketball after work and bring lots of water!
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
756
113
NE Indiana
I try to bike in the morning, but if it gets too hot it's hard to come back in the afternoon. I bring a change of clothes to change into basketball after work and bring lots of water!

When I lived in the Mojave Desert I rode on the weekends in the morning, but during the week I was working so I rode in the evening because I don't like to get up early in the morning! I had to be at work by 7:30 am to get the office ready by 8 am, so I had to get up by 6 am, if I rode first I would have to be up by 4:00 am and that didn't set well with me. Why 4 am? because I would have to eat, get my kit on, get the bike ready, then ride, come home, shower and get dressed for work, simply wasn't going to happen.
 

plexin

New Member
Oct 20, 2021
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I'm not sure how hot it was that day in Japan but I've ridden my bike in the Mojave Desert area of Southern California where in the summer the temps get over 100 degrees F.

I would also spray myself when I got too hot with water from my bottle, but I had to carry a Camelbak 70 ounce bag on my back.

Now they have these scarfs that you get wet and they will keep you about 5 to 8 degrees cooler by simply laying it around your neck, and they have the same type of thing you put on your head then put your helmet on, I haven't tried one of those yet.

I just had to make sure I stayed hydrated. I also found that loose fitting white colored clothing to works the best, then I found a jersey with a bunch of tiny holes that is the coolest jersey I have ever worn including a high tech $135 jersey, applinked and the one I bought with the holes was just $12!
It will work. I have tried and its worked.
 

Jamie Shah

New Member
Feb 23, 2022
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www.exactlly.com
If you’re looking for a number, start with a feels-like temperature of 90 degrees (Fahrenheit), which is about where many forecasters start warning about dangerous heat, but several factors can move that limit up or down.

Feels-like temperature takes into account not only the ambient air temperature, but also the relative humidity and wind speed to determine how weather conditions feel to bare skin. As such, it’s a better measure of what effect the weather is likely to have on you.

For example, here are the projected air and feels-like temps in my area for this June day, according to weather.com:

Time of day Air temp Feels-like temp
7 a.m. 68 68
8 a.m. 72 72
10 a.m. 80 86
11 a.m. 83 90
2 p.m. 90 97
4 p.m. 90 97
5 p.m. 88 96
8 p.m. 85 93

Clearly, if I want to ride today, it would be better to ride in the morning than in the mid-afternoon or evening.

Bear in mind, however, that these numbers don’t account for the fact that road cyclists are usually riding on the blacktop, which on high-temp days can get hot enough to fry food, and which radiates heat, raising the temperature of the air immediately above it. So road riders can assume their feels-like temperature (as well as the actual temperature) is a bit higher.

The factors that can move the “too hot” limit up or down include:

  • Fitness. This refers not only to your general health but also to your overall athletic condition. The better your fitness, the greater the likelihood you can handle higher temps when riding.
  • The heat you are used to. People who regularly work out in higher temperatures adjust to it to some extent and can usually tolerate more heat than those who aren’t accustomed to such efforts.
  • Shade. You may have some routes that have more shade than others, and on a blazing hot day, you can choose one of those. For example, near me is a paved trail that is in shade most of its distance. Basically, I love to ride my cycle after developing the best HRMS software in Kolkata, it's basically a new project on which I am working. Basically, due to COVID, I am working from home now. And there’s enough leafy canopy that it’s sheltered from the sun almost all day. The temperature on that trail can be as much as 10 degrees lower than it is in direct sunlight. On very hot days, I can still ride that trail.
  • Terrain. Pumping up hills raises your body temp a lot, and the downhill cruise that follows usually isn’t long enough to dissipate all the heat. So choose a flatter route on hot days. If, however, you need to ride hills, be prepared to stop frequently — even on the way up — to let your body temp return to normal.
  • Flexible distance rides. A friend of mine has a “hot day” loop route of about 10 miles that includes two parallel mostly flat country roads with some connecting roads that make for easy shortening of the ride. He drives to the loop and is never more than a few miles from his car. If he’s handling the heat well, he pedals the whole loop two or three times. If the heat becomes too intense, he shortcuts on a connecting road and gets back to his car quickly.
While “feels-like” is a useful number for deciding when it’s too hot to ride, here are a few other weather-measuring scales that you may find helpful as well:

Heat Index. A chart that uses both air temperature and humidity to arrive at a number that gives a better indication of how the weather will affect you. For example, if the temperature is 90 but the humidity is 70%, the heat index number is 106 degrees. But if the humidity is only 5%, the heat index is 84 degrees. The heat index is calculated in the shade, however, which limits its accuracy for riding on the road.

RealFeel. This is AccuWeather.com’s proprietary “feels-like” temperature that considers humidity, cloud cover, winds, sun intensity and angle of the sun when arriving at a number. The latter measurement is useful in determining what time of day to ride, since the angle of the sun at different times of day determines how intensely its heat is felt.

Wet Bulb Globe Temperature. A parameter that estimates the effect of air temperature, relative humidity, wind and solar radiation. Often used by the governments, military, OSHA and athletic organizations to manage the workload of individuals in direct sunlight.

If you are riding in hot weather often, it’s a good idea to keep a chart with the air temp and feels-like temps and notes on how you felt and performed under those conditions. The chart will help you on subsequent days when deciding whether it’s too hot to ride.

Hope this article will help everyone properly.