When To Replace Drivetrain???

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ryan Bates, May 6, 2004.

  1. Ryan Bates

    Ryan Bates Guest

    hi, i can't figure out if my drive train is too worn or not. are
    there standard measurements that could help me out? i have dura ace
    components. isn't there some kind of chain length check? my chain for
    12 links from pin to pin is just a tad over 12 1/16", so i couldn't
    remember if that's too much stretch or not. if i do need to replace
    the chain then, do i need to replace chainrings and cassette as well
    for them to mesh well???? thanks! [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. "Ryan Bates" wrote:
    > hi, i can't figure out if my drive train is too worn or not. are
    > there standard measurements that could help me out? i have dura ace
    > components. isn't there some kind of chain length check? my chain for
    > 12 links from pin to pin is just a tad over 12 1/16", so i couldn't
    > remember if that's too much stretch or not.


    You're right at the point where you should replace the chain.

    > if i do need to replace
    > the chain then, do i need to replace chainrings and cassette as well
    > for them to mesh well????


    Usually not. If you replace the chain before it gets too worn, you won't
    cause excess wear on the cassette and chainrings.

    If the casssette cogs are worn, the new chain will skip on them. A cassette
    should outlast several chains, and chainrings should last even longer.

    Art Harris
     
  3. daveornee

    daveornee Guest

    Ryan Bates wrote:
    > hi, i can't figure out if my drive train is too worn or not. are there
    > standard measurements that could help me out? i have dura ace
    > components. isn't there some kind of chain length check? my chain for 12
    > links from pin to pin is just a tad over 12 1/16", so i couldn't
    > remember if that's too much stretch or not. if i do need to replace the
    > chain then, do i need to replace chainrings and cassette as well for
    > them to mesh well???? thanks! [email protected]




    Good timing! http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html should answer all your
    questions on this topic. My short answer is to get a new Shimano DURA
    ACE chain and use the old one to help you determine the correct length.
    No new cassette or chain rings are needed unless you have damage.
    During chain replacement is a good time for a complete cleaning of cogs
    and rings.



    --
     
  4. How old, age,miles,dirt,ect.

    I MTB 2004
     
  5. Ryan Bates wrote:

    > hi, i can't figure out if my drive train is too worn or not. are
    > there standard measurements that could help me out? i have dura ace
    > components. isn't there some kind of chain length check? my chain for
    > 12 links from pin to pin is just a tad over 12 1/16", so i couldn't
    > remember if that's too much stretch or not. if i do need to replace
    > the chain then, do i need to replace chainrings and cassette as well
    > for them to mesh well???? thanks! [email protected]


    As other posters have said, you should replace the chain now. BTW, that
    12 1/16" measurement should be taken with it hanging down so all the
    links are under tension. If you're measuring it laid flat on a table it
    may well be much worse than you think.

    My touring bike chain has just hit the limit after 2,000 miles (it rains
    a lot here) so a new chain is in the post. There is no damage to the
    rings or sprockets yet.
     
  6. "Zog The Undeniable" wrote:

    > BTW, that
    > 12 1/16" measurement should be taken with it hanging down so all the
    > links are under tension.


    Normally, the chain would be measured on the bike, and the rear derailleur
    would provide the tension.

    Art Harris
     
  7. Ryan Bates

    Ryan Bates Guest

    thanks for the help, it's definitely time to get a new chain. but for
    the cassette and chainrings, is there a good measurement for wear on
    them, other than the "if they look like shark fins" method? thanks
    much
     
  8. Dave-<< My short answer is to get a new Shimano DURA
    ACE chain a >><BR><BR>


    High end plated chains don't perform any better than lower end, not as pretty,
    chains. Use the cheapest compatible chain...like a PC-48 for 8s, PC-59 for 9s,
    Wipperman for 10s...

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > Dave-<< My short answer is to get a new Shimano DURA
    > ACE chain a >><BR><BR>
    >
    >
    > High end plated chains don't perform any better than lower end, not
    > as pretty, chains. Use the cheapest compatible chain...like a PC-48
    > for 8s, PC-59 for 9s, Wipperman for 10s...


    Yup. If you like chrome, buy a Harley.

    In your experience, how long should a chain last? I hear everything from 500 to
    20000 miles from different people. In my case it's about 2000 miles (I think).
    How about you?

    Matt O.
     
  10. the blur

    the blur Guest

    Ryan Bates wrote:
    > hi, i can't figure out if my drive train is too worn or not. are there
    > standard measurements that could help me out? i have dura ace
    > components. isn't there some kind of chain length check? my chain for 12
    > links from pin to pin is just a tad over 12 1/16", so i couldn't
    > remember if that's too much stretch or not. if i do need to replace the
    > chain then, do i need to replace chainrings and cassette as well for
    > them to mesh well???? thanks! [email protected]




    fyi park makes a chain checker tool that you slip next to a link and let
    if fall on the chain-if it drops all the way in it's time for a change.
    cost me $8 at biketoolsetc.com



    --
     
  11. "Ryan Bates" wrote:

    > thanks for the help, it's definitely time to get a new chain. but for
    > the cassette and chainrings, is there a good measurement for wear on
    > them, other than the "if they look like shark fins" method? thanks
    > much


    If the cassette is worn, a new chain will skip. If it doesn't skip, your
    cassette is ok.

    I see that Performance likes to sell a package deal of a chain and cassette.
    That gives the impression that you should change both. It certainly won't
    hurt, but it's not necessary.

    As for chainrings on a road bike, you ought to _lots_ of miles before you
    see pronounced hooking.

    Art Harris
     
  12. matt-<< In your experience, how long should a chain last? I hear everything
    from 500 to
    20000 miles from different people. In my case it's about 2000 miles (I think).
    How about you? >><BR><BR>

    Really tough to put a number on it. Really depends on how well the rider keeps
    his chain and components clean. Also depends on if they wander around in
    big/big or small/small combos, which we see a lot. We use a Rohloff chain
    length checker and have seen chains with as little as 2500 miles and as much as
    7500 miles measure the same...8, 9 and 10s chains.

    If you wish to put a milage measurement on it, 2500-3000 miles but that may be
    too early or too late.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. To check for chain stretch I lay the chain sideways on the bench and
    pull it straight, alongside a plastic ruler. This is accurate enough
    to show a 1/16 or 1/8 amount of stretch. I would tend to let a chain
    go to the latter especially if you have to replace the cassette.

    In the old days replacement sprockets were readily available for most
    freewheels, so you could replace the outer one or two sprockets only.
    Today this is not possible on the cheaper Shimano cassettes, except
    perhaps the outer sprocket only.

    I believe there is a market for slightly used chains which would avoid
    having to replace the cassette. It ought to be possible for
    manufacturers to produce a model which is a tad outside normal
    tolerance, effectively pre-stretched, though perhaps money-saving
    ideas are not pou;ar among manufacturers.

    Cheers

    Peter Shelton
    Port Williams, NS
     
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