when to supplement mineral loss

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by nurul, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. nurul

    nurul New Member

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    Aside from having a balanced diet, I would like to know how to monitor one's magnesium, potassium and sodium levels so that we know how much supplement we need in order to avoid ingesting too much or too little.
    Over the years I have paid too little atention to mineral supplements only to relaise far too late after my body was sapped of these elements so I have begun to take supplements before and after I ride such as "stop cramp" and vit c. But how do we really monitor how much we need?? finger prick test??
     
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  2. Feltski

    Feltski New Member

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    The only thing I can think of is a blood test. Does anyone know if any portable ones exist? Obviously going to the dr for blood tests that often isnt really a realistic option
     
  3. Bike N Ski

    Bike N Ski New Member

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    I do it on a daily maintenance(not just for cycling) basis with trace mineral drops. 20 drops a day into a gallon of drinking water and you get more than 40 trace minerals(from antimony to zirconium and all points in between). If your going to play with individual mineral doses effectively, you'll need a blood panel done to get serum levels(i.e. -1.8 to 3.0 mg/dL is normal for Magnesium). Most of the research I've done over the years feel this is a meaningless test without some clinical history to back it up. For most cyclist a good balanced diet, multi-vitamin, and good sports drink(on hard days) should be all you need to maintain electrolyte levels.
     
  4. nurul

    nurul New Member

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    ok what are "trace mineral drops"???
    Let's presume we need Xmg of magnesium every day. If I do a 140kkm or 5hrs zone 3 ride (one 3 in my book being 70-80%) then how much magnesium have I lost? This must depend on watts used, weather, body physiology because I presume each indivdual uses up minerals or vitamnis at different rates???. Or to play it self take the max recommended dosis of each mineral after every ride??
    or for example today I did 3 hill repeats in the 50-14. Would I lose more minerals doing that kind of activity than a 140km ride???
     
  5. Bike N Ski

    Bike N Ski New Member

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    To answer your first question you would have to know who much magnesium you had before you started and how much after you finished - blood and urine tests. Again, very few cyclist's need to supplement(its usually a pre-existing medical condition) individual minerals. Who put this in you mind that you are suffering from an electrolyte imbalance or sever mineral loss? Taking in too many electrolytes will set off hormonal triggers in you body that may create all sorts of problems such as gastric stress, edema, or muscle spasm and cramping. You are right in assuming that there are too many variables to try and figure out the right dosage of minerals. I don't know anything about you but it sounds like you might be overreaching at best, and possibly overtraining based on what you said in your first post. Good diet and proper rest to let your body recover should be enough. On hard days sip on a good sports drink, eat a few bananas, and take a good quaility multi-vitamin that will contain the minerals your body needs to aid in recovery. You'd be better served by talking to the person that said you were mineral deficient. I just don't feel it happens enough to cyclist's for you to get this concerned about it. (Trace minerals are something I put in my water year round for general health. They have nothing to do with enhancing you performance in any sport. Their source is ionic sea minerals(over 50 in all minus sodium). Research suggests that metabolism is enhanced by proper enzyme activity, and proper enzyme activity is enhanced by the presence of certain minerals in minute quantities.)
     
  6. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Blood tests won't tell you because your body will take Mg out of your bones and restore blood Mg levels as soon as it can. I think severe cramping may be a sign if you cover all the other causes such as by stretching and making sure you have caught up on your hydration. To me it suggests your body can't restore the balance fast enough naturally.

    Antimony is toxic and not essential. Oddly, trace amounts of arsenic are essential. If I used trace mineral drops I would try to find one which at least claimed to be mined from an older source before we put all this pollution in the ground (which washes out into the sea.) There was one which claimed to be mined from older salt deposits in the Utah desert but I don't recall the name.
     
  7. Bike N Ski

    Bike N Ski New Member

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    Blood tests won't tell you what?

    A magnesium test checks the level of magnesium in the blood. Magnesium is an important electrolyte needed for proper muscle, nerve, and enzyme function. A test for magnesium is done to:

    Find a cause for nerve and muscle problems, such as muscle twitches,
    irritability, and muscle weakness.

    Measure levels when magnesium is being given for medical treatment.
    source: WebMD

    Antimony is toxic and not essential At what levels? Vitamins can be toxic also. The benefits of antimony have be known by the medical community for years and used as an intravenously administered anthelmintic. You'd probably be shocked to learn that many drugs taken today are not only not essential, but far more toxic(read harmful) to the user compared to the ""trace"" amounts of antimony I've been exposed to over the past 15 years or so.

    There was one which claimed to be mined from older salt deposits in the Utah desert but I don't recall the name

    That be ah company out ta Roy, Utah, playa, called Trace Minerals Research.
    The only reason I know this is because I'm looking at the bottle right now.
    :eek:
     
  8. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Since your body has stores of magnesium in your bones and other places, you can be deficient during exercise because of the increased demand, but quickly return to normal while you shower, drive to the doctor's office, and roll up your sleeve for a blood test.

    Also, some sources suggest a test of blood levels will not reveal a deficiency until it's pretty bad because your body prioritizes the level of Mg in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid over things like bone strength and will take Mg out of your bones in order to maintain proper blood levels.
    How do you know how much you've had?
     
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