When to true wheels?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Fred, Jun 26, 2003.

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  1. Fred

    Fred Guest

    I've noticed recently that I can detect a very, very slight wobble to the front tire as I ride. It
    is barely perceptible but it wasn't there before. I get no chatter on the front brake at all. It
    feels like it always did. I did have to tighten a loose spoke a week ago but I just tightened the
    one so that it sounded like the others when plucked and didn't touch any others. Am I OK or do I
    need to see about truing the wheel? Thanks.

    Fred
     
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  2. > I've noticed recently that I can detect a very, very slight wobble to the front tire as I ride. It
    > is barely perceptible but it wasn't there
    before.
    > I get no chatter on the front brake at all. It feels like it always did.
    I
    > did have to tighten a loose spoke a week ago but I just tightened the one
    so
    > that it sounded like the others when plucked and didn't touch any others. Am I OK or do I need to
    > see about truing the wheel? Thanks.

    If you're seeing a wobble in the front tire, it's most likely from the tire itself. It's not unusual
    for tire casings to have minor distortions when new, and sometimes they'll develop them over time if
    you hit something hard enough to damage the casing. Any sort of major distortion is an indication of
    possible failure.

    The easiest way to tell if it's actually the wheel that needs truing is to reference the rim at the
    brake pad. A small amount of wobble is not cause for concern, but spokes that are markedly looser
    than others in the wheel would be.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
     
  3. Fred

    Fred Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:pWIKa.1375$%[email protected]...
    > > I've noticed recently that I can detect a very, very slight wobble to
    the
    > > front tire as I ride. It is barely perceptible but it wasn't there
    > before.
    > > I get no chatter on the front brake at all. It feels like it always
    did.
    > I
    > > did have to tighten a loose spoke a week ago but I just tightened the
    one
    > so
    > > that it sounded like the others when plucked and didn't touch any
    others.
    > > Am I OK or do I need to see about truing the wheel? Thanks.
    >
    > If you're seeing a wobble in the front tire, it's most likely from the
    tire
    > itself. It's not unusual for tire casings to have minor distortions when new, and sometimes
    > they'll develop them over time if you hit something
    hard
    > enough to damage the casing. Any sort of major distortion is an
    indication
    > of possible failure.
    >
    > The easiest way to tell if it's actually the wheel that needs truing is to reference the rim at
    > the brake pad. A small amount of wobble is not cause for concern, but spokes that are markedly
    > looser than others in the wheel would be.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
    >
    >
    Thanks. I'll just leave it for now and see how things develop. I only had one loose spoke. Can't
    tell you why. I'll check the wheel against the brake pad as you suggest tomorrow morning before I
    ride. I'm probably just a little overly concerned about nothing. Take care.

    Fred
     
  4. Fred <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I've noticed recently that I can detect a very, very slight wobble to the front tire as I ride. It
    : is barely perceptible but it wasn't there before. I get no chatter on the front brake at all. It
    : feels like it always did. I did have to tighten a loose spoke a week ago but I just tightened the
    : one so that it sounded like the others when plucked and didn't touch any others. Am I OK or do I
    : need to see about truing the wheel? Thanks.

    I guess if you had a truing stand it could make sense to periodically check the wheels, or whenever
    you notice something unusual. I think some people even true their wheels using just the brake pads
    as a guide... hmm I did that once, should try the truing stand now :)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I guess if you had a truing stand it could make sense to periodically check the wheels, or
    > whenever you notice something unusual. I think some people even true their wheels using just the
    > brake pads as a guide... hmm I did that once, should try the truing stand now :)

    You don't need a truing stand to check wheels, brake pads are fine. You do (to OP) need to check
    against the rim, not the tire. Well tensioned wheels shouldn't need regular attention, stress
    relieved wheels shouldn't break spokes. Check out the FAQ for more wheel info.
     
  6. On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 23:47:22 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You don't need a truing stand to check wheels, brake pads are fine. You do (to OP) need to check
    >against the rim, not the tire. Well tensioned wheels shouldn't need regular attention, stress
    >relieved wheels shouldn't break spokes. Check out the FAQ for more wheel info.

    Stress relieved *and* properly tensioned. No amount of stress relieving is gonna keep spokes from
    dying if the tension on the bottom spokes drops to , which can happen with not-terribly-tight wheels
    and heavy riders.

    Jasper
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 23:47:22 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You don't need a truing stand to check wheels, brake pads are fine. You do
    (to
    > >OP) need to check against the rim, not the tire. Well tensioned wheels shouldn't need regular
    > >attention, stress relieved wheels shouldn't break spokes. Check out the FAQ for more wheel info.
    >
    > Stress relieved *and* properly tensioned. No amount of stress relieving is gonna keep spokes from
    > dying if the tension on the bottom spokes drops to , which can happen with not-terribly-tight
    > wheels and heavy riders.

    That's what I meant by "well tensioned". I would have thought that obvious.
     
  8. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 11:56:00 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 23:47:22 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You don't need a truing stand to check wheels, brake pads are fine. You do (to OP) need to check
    >> >against the rim, not the tire. Well tensioned wheels shouldn't need regular attention, stress
    >> >relieved wheels shouldn't break spokes. Check out the FAQ for more wheel info.
    >>
    >> Stress relieved *and* properly tensioned. No amount of stress relieving is gonna keep spokes from
    >> dying if the tension on the bottom spokes drops to , which can happen with not-terribly-tight
    >> wheels and heavy riders.
    >
    >That's what I meant by "well tensioned". I would have thought that obvious.

    Maybe I misinterpreted, but it looked like you were stating two separate and independent effects:
    Well-tensioned results in wheels that don't need truing, and stress relieved results in wheels that
    don't drop spokes, and if you do both you get both.

    Jasper
     
  9. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 11:56:00 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >"Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 23:47:22 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >You don't need a truing stand to check wheels, brake pads are fine. You
    do (to
    > >> >OP) need to check against the rim, not the tire. Well tensioned wheels shouldn't need regular
    > >> >attention, stress relieved wheels shouldn't break spokes. Check out the FAQ for more wheel
    > >> >info.
    > >>
    > >> Stress relieved *and* properly tensioned. No amount of stress relieving
    is
    > >> gonna keep spokes from dying if the tension on the bottom spokes drops to , which can happen
    > >> with not-terribly-tight wheels and heavy riders.
    > >
    > >That's what I meant by "well tensioned". I would have thought that obvious.
    >
    > Maybe I misinterpreted, but it looked like you were stating two separate and independent effects:
    > Well-tensioned results in wheels that don't need truing, and stress relieved results in wheels
    > that don't drop spokes, and if you do both you get both.

    Thanks for catching that, someone could have been seriously hurt if they thought my advice was:
    tension *or* stress relieve. It's guys like you that make this NG what it is.
     
  10. On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 00:06:17 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...

    >> Maybe I misinterpreted, but it looked like you were stating two separate and independent effects:
    >> Well-tensioned results in wheels that don't need truing, and stress relieved results in wheels
    >> that don't drop spokes, and if you do both you get both.
    >
    >Thanks for catching that, someone could have been seriously hurt if they thought my advice was:
    >tension *or* stress relieve. It's guys like you that make this NG what it is.

    Now I'm wondering whether that's a compliment or not ;)

    Jasper
     
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