Where are the recipes & cooking tips?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Hopeful Cook, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. In article <[email protected]>,
    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Hopeful Cook) wrote:
    >
    > > I am only a lurker but I have been here many times and have yet to
    > > believe that this is really a cooking group. What does all the tension
    > > and debate have to do with cooking? There seems to be allot of drama
    > > and hostility about subjects totally unrelated to cooking.
    > >
    > > Is it the rec. in the name of the group that makes it so different? I do
    > > not mean to criticize but I just really do not understand why it is
    > > call a cooking group.

    >
    > Whining about the whining doesn't diminish the whining.
    >
    >
    > I have detected nothing in your post about recipes, cooking tips or food
    > experiences.
    >
    > I would be happy to read about your cooking experiences.
    >
    >
    > Please contribute to our group and ignore the garbage.


    So I'm not the only one that took that post as whiny..... ;-)

    Thanks Alan!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     


  2. Hopeful Cook

    Hopeful Cook Guest

    Thanks to all for your responses. Some of you helped me to undrstand
    several things and I quite agree that I should have given things more
    time and more investigation before making implecations. For that I
    apologize. To those of you that found me to be a whiner you are
    certainly entitled to your opinion but I did not intend to whine nor
    will the fact that you called me one lessen my visits. I did not
    realize that asking a sincere question was considered whining. To those
    who pointed out that my post did not contain anything about recipes or
    cooking tips I tend to disagree. I asked where they were. At the risk of
    getting caught up in the debate and drama I will end this post.

    May your kettles always be full. :)

    HopefulCook
     
  3. Hopeful Cook wrote:

    >Thanks to all for your responses. Some of you helped me to undrstand
    >several things and I quite agree that I should have given things more
    >time and more investigation before making implecations. For that I
    >apologize. To those of you that found me to be a whiner you are
    >certainly entitled to your opinion but I did not intend to whine nor
    >will the fact that you called me one lessen my visits. I did not
    >realize that asking a sincere question was considered whining. To those
    >who pointed out that my post did not contain anything about recipes or
    >cooking tips I tend to disagree. I asked where they were. At the risk of
    >getting caught up in the debate and drama I will end this post.
    >
    >May your kettles always be full. :)
    >
    >HopefulCook
    >
    >
    >

    Good on you! The bark's worse than the bite with most people here. I
    didn't think you were whining, just a bit disoriented. The fact is that
    rfc is pretty unusual in the way the regulars keep order. They actually
    love newbies and are falling over themselves to hand out useful advice,
    not to mention unsolicited opinions.

    Silly questions will get silly answers of course, but if you think
    somebody has been unfair to you, stand up for yourself!

    I hope you don't just lurk. Join in, tell us what *you* think about things.

    Cheers
    Christine
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 08:13:50 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> ObFood: Room temp piroshkies ain't bad. Leftovers from earlier
    >> tonight that hadn't been moved out of the pan.

    >
    >Steve, I thought that room temp was the norm. Sort of like Russian
    >pasties. (SORT of, Bubba Vic. Calm down.)


    <shrug> Beats me. I just assumed that since you cook them as a
    meal (with sauteed onions sometimes), you serve them hot. Never
    really thought about it, nor seen them served in restaurants -
    except for in the movie "Men in Black".

    -sw
     
  5. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    Old Mother Ashby wrote:
    >
    > I hope you don't just lurk. Join in, tell us what *you* think about things.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Christine


    Agreed, I do alot of lurking nowadays, but I enjoy this group for more
    than the recipe & tip posts. Most of the people here are very interesting.
     
  6. sf

    sf Guest

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 12:19:49 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > That's odd... When I first joined it, I found it to be one of the less
    > vicious ones.


    Joined? This is a club? If it is, I'm not a dues paying memeber.
    LOL

    RFC was probably the first ng I found xx years ago and it didn't phase
    me at all. I thought it was terrific place to find food related
    topics and still do. Of course, now I own a paid version of my
    newsreader so I can Kill at will.... which keeps rfc at its best for
    me.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  7. Hopeful Cook wrote:
    > At the risk of
    > getting caught up in the debate and drama I will end this post.



    But don't end posting altogether (unless you want to). This group can
    be opinionated and sarcastic, but we also have short memories. If you
    jump in with a question, comment, recipe, tip, opinion, or description
    of last night's dinner, you'll become a regular and get responses to
    whatever you post.


    --Lia
     
  8. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 12:19:49 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    >
    >> That's odd... When I first joined it, I found it to be one of the less
    >> vicious ones.

    >
    >
    > Joined? This is a club? If it is, I'm not a dues paying memeber.
    > LOL
    >



    Umm, actually you are, and you are *way* behind on your dues. If you
    could send me a check at your earliest convenience, it would be greatly
    appreciated. Thanks.

    Best regards,
    Bob
    Treasurer
     
  9. zxcvbob <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:[email protected]:

    > sf wrote:
    >> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 12:19:49 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> That's odd... When I first joined it, I found it to be one of the less
    >>> vicious ones.

    >>
    >>
    >> Joined? This is a club? If it is, I'm not a dues paying memeber.
    >> LOL
    >>

    >
    >
    > Umm, actually you are, and you are *way* behind on your dues. If you
    > could send me a check at your earliest convenience, it would be greatly
    > appreciated. Thanks.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob
    > Treasurer
    >


    It's a $1000 per year. So how many years dues are owed?

    Michael

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  10. Jude

    Jude Guest

    sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 12:19:49 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > That's odd... When I first joined it, I found it to be one of the less
    > > vicious ones.

    >
    > Joined? This is a club? If it is, I'm not a dues paying memeber.
    > LOL
    >

    Sssssshhhh, don't tell Barb! She's gonna send you a bill! =)
     
  11. Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 08:13:50 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> ObFood: Room temp piroshkies ain't bad. Leftovers from earlier
    > >> tonight that hadn't been moved out of the pan.

    > >
    > >Steve, I thought that room temp was the norm. Sort of like Russian
    > >pasties. (SORT of, Bubba Vic. Calm down.)

    >
    > <shrug> Beats me. I just assumed that since you cook them as a
    > meal (with sauteed onions sometimes), you serve them hot. Never
    > really thought about it, nor seen them served in restaurants -
    > except for in the movie "Men in Black".
    >
    > -sw


    You definitely eat them hot. But they would probably
    be okay cold, too, in a pinch. I fell in love with
    them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    back to PA I learned how to make my own.

    Kate
     
  12. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Kate Connally wrote:
    I fell in love with
    > them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    > That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    > That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    > ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    > great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    > is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    > back to PA I learned how to make my own.
    >
    > Kate


    So I take it Ren Faires feel no obligation to serve historically
    accurate food? I'm kinda surprised, yet I understand how hard that would
    be...?
    Goomba
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Hopeful Cook) wrote:

    > Thanks to all for your responses. Some of you helped me to undrstand
    > several things and I quite agree that I should have given things more
    > time and more investigation before making implecations. For that I
    > apologize. To those of you that found me to be a whiner you are
    > certainly entitled to your opinion but I did not intend to whine nor
    > will the fact that you called me one lessen my visits. I did not
    > realize that asking a sincere question was considered whining. To those
    > who pointed out that my post did not contain anything about recipes or
    > cooking tips I tend to disagree. I asked where they were. At the risk of
    > getting caught up in the debate and drama I will end this post.
    >
    > May your kettles always be full. :)
    >
    > HopefulCook
    >


    Much better. ;-)

    I apologize for being a bitch, and welcome to the list!

    Please understand, this is a cooking list but in case you are not
    accustomed to usenet lists, they tend to be a bit of a "community".
    Hell, people even meet on these lists and get married!

    While the vast majority of postings will be about food, there will be a
    host of other conversations going on.

    For a real fun time, try signing into the chat sometime when it's up and
    running!

    Cheers!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 12:19:49 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> That's odd... When I first joined it, I found it to be one of the less
    > >> vicious ones.

    > >
    > >
    > > Joined? This is a club? If it is, I'm not a dues paying memeber.
    > > LOL
    > >

    >
    >
    > Umm, actually you are, and you are *way* behind on your dues. If you
    > could send me a check at your earliest convenience, it would be greatly
    > appreciated. Thanks.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob
    > Treasurer


    <snork> Nice try Bob...... ;-D
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> ObFood: Room temp piroshkies ain't bad. Leftovers from earlier
    > >> tonight that hadn't been moved out of the pan.

    > >
    > >Steve, I thought that room temp was the norm. Sort of like Russian
    > >pasties. (SORT of, Bubba Vic. Calm down.)

    >
    > <shrug> Beats me. I just assumed that since you cook them as a
    > meal (with sauteed onions sometimes), you serve them hot. Never
    > really thought about it, nor seen them served in restaurants -
    > except for in the movie "Men in Black".


    Okay, so what is it you are both talking about??? Pirozhki (Russian
    word, and please notice the spelling), or pierogi (Polish word)? The
    former are baked or fried pastries/pasties, they are never a meal and
    never served with sautéed onions; the latter are boiled (and sometimes
    subsequently pan-fried by the clueless or barbarous) dumplings, they are
    often enough served with fried onions and little pieces of bacon.
    Pirozhki are eaten hot or cold (room temperature); pierogi are normally
    eaten hot only. Anything else is a personal preference/perversity.

    Victor
     
  16. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1hc7p2h.2gnfzlnqf1zeN%[email protected]
    > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> <shrug> Beats me. I just assumed that since you cook them as a
    >> meal (with sauteed onions sometimes), you serve them hot. Never
    >> really thought about it, nor seen them served in restaurants -
    >> except for in the movie "Men in Black".

    >
    > Okay, so what is it you are both talking about??? Pirozhki (Russian
    > word, and please notice the spelling), or pierogi (Polish word)? The
    > former are baked or fried pastries/pasties, they are never a meal and
    > never served with sautéed onions; the latter are boiled (and sometimes
    > subsequently pan-fried by the clueless or barbarous) dumplings, they are
    > often enough served with fried onions and little pieces of bacon.
    > Pirozhki are eaten hot or cold (room temperature); pierogi are normally
    > eaten hot only. Anything else is a personal preference/perversity.



    I was wondering that too. My mother is Russian and we usually have Pirozhki
    hot. this sautéed onions bit really had me stumped - I'd never heard of it.

    Jen
     
  17. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:


    > You definitely eat them hot. But they would probably
    > be okay cold, too, in a pinch. I fell in love with
    > them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    > That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    > That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    > ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    > great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    > is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    > back to PA I learned how to make my own.


    According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5 in PA:

    http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html

    I was always fascinated by the ribs. They were whole ribs, two or three
    feet long. The one we went to has been closed for some time. I have a
    costume that my wife made for me.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  18. In article <1hc7p2h.2gnfzlnqf1zeN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> ObFood: Room temp piroshkies ain't bad. Leftovers from earlier
    > > >> tonight that hadn't been moved out of the pan.
    > > >
    > > >Steve, I thought that room temp was the norm. Sort of like Russian
    > > >pasties. (SORT of, Bubba Vic. Calm down.)

    > >
    > > <shrug> Beats me. I just assumed that since you cook them as a
    > > meal (with sauteed onions sometimes), you serve them hot. Never
    > > really thought about it, nor seen them served in restaurants -
    > > except for in the movie "Men in Black".

    >
    > Okay, so what is it you are both talking about??? Pirozhki (Russian
    > word, and please notice the spelling), or pierogi (Polish word)? The
    > former are baked or fried pastries/pasties, they are never a meal and
    > never served with sautéed onions; the latter are boiled (and sometimes
    > subsequently pan-fried by the clueless or barbarous)


    Clueless Barbarian reporting in, Sir!! Bite me! "-)


    > dumplings, they are
    > often enough served with fried onions and little pieces of bacon.
    > Pirozhki are eaten hot or cold (room temperature); pierogi are normally
    > eaten hot only. Anything else is a personal preference/perversity.
    >
    > Victor

    --
    -Barb
    <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-8-2006, Mekong River Thai Cuisine
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Hopeful Cook) wrote:

    > Thanks to all for your responses. Some of you helped me to undrstand
    > several things and I quite agree that I should have given things more
    > time and more investigation before making implecations. For that I
    > apologize. To those of you that found me to be a whiner you are
    > certainly entitled to your opinion but I did not intend to whine nor
    > will the fact that you called me one lessen my visits. I did not
    > realize that asking a sincere question was considered whining. To those
    > who pointed out that my post did not contain anything about recipes or
    > cooking tips I tend to disagree. I asked where they were. At the risk of
    > getting caught up in the debate and drama I will end this post.
    >
    > May your kettles always be full. :)
    >
    > HopefulCook


    Hey! I stood up for you, Ms. Cook! I didn't think you were whining!
    Like so much in life, it's about perception.
    Don't let the bastards wear you down! Stick around. (Sounds like you
    plan to.)
    --
    -Barb
    <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-15-06, Sam I Am! Hamantaschen and
    Peanut Butter cookies for Grandpa.
    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  20. Goomba38 wrote:
    >
    > Kate Connally wrote:
    > I fell in love with
    > > them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    > > That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    > > That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    > > ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    > > great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    > > is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    > > back to PA I learned how to make my own.
    > >
    > > Kate

    >
    > So I take it Ren Faires feel no obligation to serve historically
    > accurate food?


    Well, who's to say they didn't have piroshkis during
    the Renaissance? Now the cantaloupe thing I guess is
    definitely out of place. But I'm not all that gung ho
    on the accuracy thing as long as the food is good. ;-)

    Kate
     
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