where can I get angled(?) pedals?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by sershe, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. sershe

    sershe New Member

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    Hi.
    When I was a kid I broke my lower leg in the area where there were no good doctors, and the doctor who was there put it in the cast angled.
    Since then, if I stand with legs straight and knees pointing forward, my left toe is pointing like 15-20 degrees outwards.

    I recently switched from basic platform pedals to toe clips, at first I rode w/clips very loose to get used to the pedals. Recently I felt like I could start tightening the clips.
    When I do that however, my leg gets fixed with forward pointing toe, very unnatural position that causes my left Achilles area to feel tingly/funny in an unpleasant way after the rides.
    I suspect the same would happen w/the cleats.
    Are there pedals out there (cleats or toe clips) that can be adjusted to be angled? Or is there some other hack I can use to ride efficiently?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    I think your best bet is to get a pair of kneesavers: http://www.kneesaver.net/, then only use the left one. It won't change the angle of the pedal, but it will move it further out, allowing your foot to go on more diagonally and still clear the crank arm.

    For clipless, you'd want to check the amount of float. More float tend to bring more adjustability in terms of alignment as well as more freedom of movement around the reference position.

    If that isn't enough, you might have to take a Dremel and reshape the cleat anchor recesses in the shoe to allow for a more radical alignment.
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Speedplay offer a range of pedals that work well for guys with orthopedic issues with the knee/foot.

    They offer models with "unlimited" float (note the required release/exit angle...may or may not work with your foot angle/leg strength/range of available rotational movement).

    http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.xspecs

    Speedplay sells an excellent product line, with pedals for the recreational rider right up to the most experienced professional.
     
  4. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Even without a lot a float, most cleat systems allow some adjustment of the angle of the foot relative to the pedal. Some may allow a more extreme angle. Depending on the required offset and bike geometry the issue may be with your heel hitting the chainstay.

    You may need to try a variety of setups, I would think that you could find a bike shop that can assist you.
     
  5. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    if you mean like angled pointing outwards or inwards then yes you can adjust the cleat to do that, i actually have my right foot pointing outwards (you walk like a duck a friend said) heels pointing inwards, a disaster when i tried to learn how to ski for example, but never injured or anything while cycling although my heel is quite close to the frame but never touched it, so and yes use a floating cleat or pedal system,
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Actual angled pedals, i.e. pedals whose actuals weren't perpendicular to the crank arm would, I think, be difficult to use if not harmful to your joints. For such things to work your foot would have to remain in the same position through out a complete cycle and your knee would need to track accordingly. I don't know if that would be possible or is your case. I think your best course of action would be to first try some Knee Savers. It's the least expensive and easiest thing to do (assuming that repositioning or cleats isn't possible). You'd need to choose a Knee Saver that allows your heels to clear the crank arms. The next thing to try, IMHO, would be to see some about assessing your need or lack thereof for orthotics. A foot that doesn't track parallel to the crank arm is sometimes the result of how your foot rests in the shoes and any abnormalities in your foot, knee, or lower leg. If all of that doesn't work, I'd suggest you look at Speedplay pedals. They allow a very large range of float (angular rotation of foot). Depending on how severe your foot orientation is, you might even need to use Knee Savers with the Speedplays.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. You do NOT have to mount the cleat(s) with the mounting bosses (though that certainly makes life much easier) ...

    • IMO, since your left foot points ~15+º outwards the simple solution would be to mount the cleat so that it is pointed ~15+º toward the inside edge of the sole
    • the problem which may-or-may-not ensue is some HEEL RUB on the crank arm ... consequently, I recommend that you consider applying tape, and repeat as the tape is worn away otherwise you will probably end up gouging the crank arm & eventually incur an unnecessary expense

    • YOU can determine the precise angle by applying some masking tape to the bottom of the sole and riding for a few minutes. The impression which the pedal's binding makes in the tape will give you a very good indication of the angle you want to mount cleat and/or fore-aft position.

    The "traditional" LOOK cleat has a lot of adjustment and I think may be able to accommodate being pointed 15+º off-center ...

    If you want to use a MTB shoe & SPD cleats then if you are moderately handy then you can execute a rather simple DIY modification of the sole by notching the sides of the dual slots so that you can cant the cleat to the desired angle ...

    The notching should be done AFTER you determine the fore-aft location of the cleats ...

    The notching will be more easily done with a really small Forstner-bit OR you can opt for a pair of Shimano Touring shoes ...

    • the cleat mounting plate is held in place by the cleat and is otherwise not fixed to the sole of the shoe on Shimano's Touring shoes
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    In addition to "unlimited" non-centering float (actually 15 degrees; otherwise, you'd never be able to twist out), they offer longer pedal spindles that would allow you to point your toe out without banging your ankle on the crank.

    Also, if Kneesavers are a bit steep for you, any local shop that has a J&B account can order you a pair of Sunlite Pedal Extenders. They come in two lengths.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. sershe

    sershe New Member

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    Thanks guys. It seems like the extensions are simpler but won't let me tighten the straps still.
    I'll probably start with these and then maybe try the cleats.
     
  10. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Just to be clear, the kneesavers will change the width of your stance but won't change your cleat to pedal relationship rotationally. If you need to dramatically toe out, the kneesavers will help in that you'll be less likely to clip your ankles on the crank arms but you'll still likely ride toe out. It's a bit more complex than that as your foot width or stance relative to your hip width can influence how much or how little you toe in or toe out as you ride but if it actually corrects such that you end up in a neutral toe forward position that would be pure coincidence as that's not really the design function of kneesavers. They're all about adjusting your foot width to be appropriate for your hip width and typically have more influence on pronation/supination issues and not rotation issues.

    I'd strongly suggest a clipless pedal/cleat system that supports a reasonable range of free rotation. If you want to go with road shoes I'd suggest something like the Speedplay Zero series, if you prefer an off road style shoe (which is nicer for walking in than road shoes with their slick soles and exposed cleats) then something in the CandyBrothers series like their Candy pedals which have a lot of free float. You may still want to run Kneesavers if you have a stance width issue but they generally won't correct rotation issues.

    -Dave
     
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