Where can I go?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Msa, Jun 29, 2003.

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  1. Msa

    Msa Guest

    I've got a spare weekend coming up and was thinking about getting away to cycle some hills (road). I
    live in London and was wondering if anyone had any ideas? I was think the Lakes, but that's a little
    too far for a couple of days...any thoughts on anywhere else? Devon, Wales etc.

    I'll be travelling by car and want to cycle about 100 miles each day. B&B recommendations (that like
    cyclists!) would be cool too.

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
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  2. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    MSA wrote:

    >I've got a spare weekend coming up and was thinking about getting away to cycle some hills (road).
    >I live in London and was wondering if anyone had any ideas? I was think the Lakes, but that's a
    >little too far for a couple of days...any thoughts on anywhere else? Devon, Wales etc.
    >
    >I'll be travelling by car and want to cycle about 100 miles each day. B&B recommendations (that
    >like cyclists!) would be cool too.

    I'm taking my bike on the 15:35 Paddington to Bodmin Parkway next Friday. On arrival ~19:30, I'll be
    cycling the Camel Track to Padstow where I'll be camping Friday night. I've no plans for Saturday
    and Sunday, but I have to back at Bodmin Parkway for 17:20 on Sunday for my return journey.

    Why do you have to drive to your destination? A bicycle and train are a very powerful combination
    for getting around the country quickly and safely.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  3. Msa

    Msa Guest

    "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > MSA wrote:
    >
    > >I've got a spare weekend coming up and was thinking about getting away to cycle some hills
    > >(road). I live in London and was wondering if anyone
    had
    > >any ideas? I was think the Lakes, but that's a little too far for a
    couple
    > >of days...any thoughts on anywhere else? Devon, Wales etc.
    > >
    > >I'll be travelling by car and want to cycle about 100 miles each day.
    B&B
    > >recommendations (that like cyclists!) would be cool too.
    >
    > I'm taking my bike on the 15:35 Paddington to Bodmin Parkway next Friday. On arrival ~19:30, I'll
    > be cycling the Camel Track to Padstow where I'll be camping Friday night. I've no plans for
    > Saturday and Sunday, but I have to back at Bodmin Parkway for 17:20 on Sunday for my return
    > journey.
    >
    > Why do you have to drive to your destination? A bicycle and train are a very powerful combination
    > for getting around the country quickly and safely.
    > --
    > remove remove to reply

    Err, actually I don't 'have' to, I 'want' to!

    What's the SP on taking a bike on the train anyway? Where does the bike go, can you keep it with
    you? If the answers no, then I wouldn't consider it.

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
  4. W K

    W K Guest

    "MSA" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've got a spare weekend coming up and was thinking about getting away to cycle some hills (road).
    > I live in London and was wondering if anyone had any ideas? I was think the Lakes, but that's a
    > little too far for a
    couple
    > of days...any thoughts on anywhere else? Devon, Wales etc.

    A part of England that I would never have condidered before is Hereford/worcester. (I was close to
    Ludlow). I been close to there before, and thought it would be all rather rolling and a bit ordinary
    (as it is when you are only a few miles away from the M5).

    However, there are plenty of hills, and you'll end up in mid wales if you cycle for 100 miles.
     
  5. Johnny Klunk

    Johnny Klunk Guest

    > I'm taking my bike on the 15:35 Paddington to Bodmin Parkway next Friday. On arrival ~19:30, I'll
    > be cycling the Camel Track to Padstow where I'll be camping Friday night. I've no plans for
    > Saturday and Sunday, but I have to back at Bodmin Parkway for 17:20 on Sunday for

    Great ride, we did a trip a few weeks back. From Penzance/Lands End > Padstow and back. Camel Trail
    was good. It was nice to have a flat bit after a seemingly endless run of hills. Fortunately we
    weren't camping as it bucketed down most of the time we were there, I'm sure you'll be luckier! If
    you haven't ridden it, be prepared to get messy. Not sure what the surface is, but it's a white,
    sandy substance that gets everywhere and sticks when wet!

    Definately agree that the train was the way to go. They get alot of bad press when they're off, but
    our Paddington>Penzance couldn't have been easier. Saves worrying about cars and keeps the trip cost
    effective.
     
  6. Johnny Klunk

    Johnny Klunk Guest

    > What's the SP on taking a bike on the train anyway? Where does the bike
    go,
    > can you keep it with you? If the answers no, then I wouldn't consider it.

    No, they have seperate compartments for the bike. I didn't worry about it though. It's not a
    publicly accessible part of the train (while the train is in motion) it's just behind the driver.
    You can lock up to the special racks they have.
     
  7. John B

    John B Guest

    MSA wrote:

    > "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Why do you have to drive to your destination? A bicycle and train are a very powerful
    > > combination for getting around the country quickly and safely.
    > > --
    > > remove remove to reply
    >
    > Err, actually I don't 'have' to, I 'want' to!
    >
    > What's the SP on taking a bike on the train anyway? Where does the bike go, can you keep it with
    > you? If the answers no, then I wouldn't consider it.

    I'd agree train would be the best way for your trip. Details are at:
    http://www.atob.org.uk/Bike_Rail.html

    John B
     
  8. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    MSA wrote:

    >What's the SP on taking a bike on the train anyway? Where does the bike go, can you keep it with
    >you? If the answers no, then I wouldn't consider it.

    On many local trains bikes go in the carriage with you. On most intercity trains the bike goes in
    the guards' carriage and you go next door or wherever you want. The cycle racks are of the wheel
    bender variety, but you can use them to your own purpose.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  9. zebra

    zebra Guest

    Peak District, from St Pancras, an hour and a bit to Derby and cycle north west from there. Plenty
    hills, plenty places to stay and some ex railway cycleways as well. Put '"Peak District" cycling' in
    Google and you'll find what you need. Cycle goes in guard's van, usually behind engine at one end or
    t'other. A year ago Midland Mainline charged £3 for the bike but I seem to remember reading they'd
    dropped this.
     
  10. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    "Johnny Klunk" <[email protected]:rem0ve-this:johnnyklunk.com> wrote:

    >Definately agree that the train was the way to go. They get alot of bad press when they're off, but
    >our Paddington>Penzance couldn't have been easier. Saves worrying about cars and keeps the trip
    >cost effective.

    People complain about a train running 10 or 15 minutes late, but since when has anyone been able to
    judge a 200+ mile journey by car to within 10 or 15 minutes.

    Today I coughed up £165 for a year's road tax - that's the equivalent of 4 return train journeys to
    Cornwall - and the fuel, servicing and insurance haven't been taken into account. I reckon it's
    £1000 per year to keep my car on the road, and my car's cheap to run!
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  11. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 19:50:03 +0000 (UTC), "Johnny Klunk"
    <[email protected]:rem0ve-this:johnnyklunk.com> wrote:

    >> What's the SP on taking a bike on the train anyway? Where does the bike go, can you keep it with
    >> you? If the answers no, then I wouldn't consider it.
    >
    >No, they have seperate compartments for the bike. I didn't worry about it though. It's not a
    >publicly accessible part of the train (while the train is in motion) it's just behind the driver.
    >You can lock up to the special racks they have.
    >

    I just chuck the bike in the guard's van but make sure I can see it [the bike] when the train stops
    at a station.

    James

    --
    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/c.butty/Dscf0632.jpg
     
  12. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > People complain about a train running 10 or 15 minutes late, but since when has anyone been able
    > to judge a 200+ mile journey by car to within 10 or 15 minutes.

    Not a fair comparison. Trains run to a timetable and some people consider that, having published a
    timetable, the train operators should at least strive to do what they say. Trains throughout the
    world run to timetables. Other countries appear able to ensure that there is at least a rough
    equivalence between what is written down and the departure and arrival times of the actual trains.
    That does not seem to be the case here.

    I use trains regularly -- but not in Britain unless there is no viable alternative. In Germany,
    France, most of Europe, Japan and even India trains run broadly to the published timetable. Here,
    taking the train is like taking part in a delay lottery while engaging in the self flagulation of
    dirty, overcrowded carriges.

    > Today I coughed up £165 for a year's road tax - that's the equivalent of 4 return train journeys
    > to Cornwall - and the fuel, servicing and insurance haven't been taken into account. I reckon it's
    > £1000 per year to keep my car on the road, and my car's cheap to run!

    I suspect you underestimate the fixed cost of having a car. Of course, if you actually want to go
    anywhere it is even more expensive. But, most of us decide (many with reluctance) that it is a
    facility we 'need'.

    T
     
  13. "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > People complain about a train running 10 or 15 minutes late, but since when has anyone been able
    > > to judge a 200+ mile journey by car to within 10 or 15 minutes.
    > I use trains regularly -- but not in Britain unless there is no viable alternative. In Germany,
    > France, most of Europe, Japan and even India trains run broadly to the published timetable.

    In Britain, trains run broadly to the published timetable, with an 80% punctuality rate. Granted,
    that's poor, but it's not a delay lottery, and as far as I'm able to tell it compares reasonably
    well with going anywhere by car (although I don't do so that often.)

    > Here, taking the train is like taking part in a delay lottery while engaging in the self
    > flagulation of dirty, overcrowded carriges.

    As for the carriages being dirty (by which you presumably mean full of litter), that's not self
    flagellation, that's other people being antisocial. And in case you hadn't noticed, being well
    travelled, that's a feature of the whole of Britain, not just the trains. I've not noticed
    particularly grimy trains outside of the south-east, but I'm not that well travelled in the UK.

    Overcrowding, too, I've not noticed to differ particularly between the UK and other countries.

    I'd agree that the trains in Britain are very substandard for a country this rich, but they're far
    from unusable.

    Ambrose
     
  14. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Ambrose Nankivell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I'd agree that the trains in Britain are very substandard for a country
    this
    > rich, but they're far from unusable.

    You clearly have a higher level of tolerance than me. My experience is that British trains are worse
    than any I have experienced.

    German trains are frequently full.

    The litter is not the only problem -- and yes, we are an antisocial bunch -- litter is rarely
    continuously cleared and some or the seats do not appear to have been cleaned since Victoria
    was a lass.

    Indian trains are famed for their overcrowding and slowness -- they are amazingly overcrowded in 2nd
    Class -- but they run to time and (for a very few rupees) you can travel in air-conditioned comfort.

    Even second class is fun -- you certainly get to meet the locals!!

    T
     
  15. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Ambrose Nankivell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > People complain about a train running 10 or 15 minutes late, but
    since
    > > > when has anyone been able to judge a 200+ mile journey by car to within 10 or 15 minutes.
    > > I use trains regularly -- but not in Britain unless there is no
    viable
    > > alternative. In Germany, France, most of Europe, Japan and even
    India
    > > trains run broadly to the published timetable.
    >
    > In Britain, trains run broadly to the published timetable, with an 80% punctuality rate. Granted,
    > that's poor, but it's not a delay lottery,
    and as
    > far as I'm able to tell it compares reasonably well with going
    anywhere by
    > car (although I don't do so that often.)

    In many European countries they manage 98%. Even Italy (a byword for disorganisation) does better
    than the UK.

    > > Here, taking the train is like taking part in a delay lottery while engaging in the self
    flagulation
    > > of dirty, overcrowded carriges.
    >
    > As for the carriages being dirty (by which you presumably mean full of litter), that's not self
    > flagellation, that's other people being
    antisocial.

    So it's self flagellation to willingly suffer the antisocial behaviour of others. That's what
    Tony meant.

    > And in case you hadn't noticed, being well travelled, that's a feature
    of
    > the whole of Britain, not just the trains. I've not noticed
    particularly
    > grimy trains outside of the south-east, but I'm not that well
    travelled in
    > the UK.

    In other countries they clean the trains occasionally.

    > Overcrowding, too, I've not noticed to differ particularly between the
    UK
    > and other countries.

    You jest.

    > I'd agree that the trains in Britain are very substandard for a
    country this
    > rich, but they're far from unusable.

    Easyjet offers quite cheap flights to Switzerland. Go and take a look at what can be done, and then
    come back and ask yourself how UK trains must appear to the Swiss.

    They actually have cycle space on all their trains, with a picture of a cycle on the outside of the
    carriage so you know where to get on. Amazing. But too hard for the British.
    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
  16. In news:D[email protected], Mark South
    <[email protected]> typed:
    > "Ambrose Nankivell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> And in case you hadn't noticed, being well travelled, that's a feature of the whole of Britain,
    >> not just the trains. I've not noticed particularly grimy trains outside of the south-east, but
    >> I'm not that well travelled in the UK.
    >
    > In other countries they clean the trains occasionally.
    >
    The trains I use most (Virgin, Central, GNER & Scotrail) are all pretty clean, apart from litter

    >> Overcrowding, too, I've not noticed to differ particularly between the UK and other countries.
    >
    > You jest.
    >

    I've been on intensely overcrowded trains in Germany, and crowded ones in Denmark & Belgium. I've
    also been in South Korea, where the trains run on time, but that's because there's only one on the
    track at a time, and they're not overcrowded because you have to book a ticket, even for standing.

    Admittedly, I don't commute into London, but that's a deliberate choice of mine.

    >> I'd agree that the trains in Britain are very substandard for a country this rich, but they're
    >> far from unusable.
    >
    > Easyjet offers quite cheap flights to Switzerland. Go and take a look at what can be done, and
    > then come back and ask yourself how UK trains must appear to the Swiss.

    I *said* they were substandard. Didn't you notice. However, for many journeys I want to make, they
    fit the bill.

    > They actually have cycle space on all their trains, with a picture of a cycle on the outside of
    > the carriage so you know where to get on. Amazing. But too hard for the British.

    No. There are pictures of a bike on the outside of the carriages of plenty of trains that carry
    bikes. I'd get a photo if I had a digital camera.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Ambrose Nankivell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > I'd agree that the trains in Britain are very substandard for a country
    > this
    > > rich, but they're far from unusable.
    >
    >
    > You clearly have a higher level of tolerance than me. My experience is that British trains are
    > worse than any I have experienced.
    >
    > German trains are frequently full.
    >
    > The litter is not the only problem -- and yes, we are an antisocial bunch -- litter is rarely
    > continuously cleared and some or the seats do not appear to have been cleaned since Victoria
    > was a lass.

    I wonder which trains you have actually used recently in the UK. I use GNER and Virgin regularly and
    litter is continuously cleared on both. Arriva transpennine is continuously cleared though Arriva
    north isn't, though that is a local service.

    Colin.
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > Easyjet offers quite cheap flights to Switzerland. Go and take a look at what can be done, and
    > then come back and ask yourself how UK trains must appear to the Swiss.
    >
    > They actually have cycle space on all their trains, with a picture of a cycle on the outside of
    > the carriage so you know where to get on. Amazing. But too hard for the British.

    Well, Virgin and Arriva transpennine both manage to have a picture of a bike at the appropriate
    entrance. GNER uses the guard's van and station staff usually know whether it will be at the front
    or the back.

    I don't think anyone doubts that British trains have problems but they are hardly the unusable
    trains that some seem to think.

    Colin
     
  19. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Ambrose Nankivell <[email protected]> wrote:

    : In Britain, trains run broadly to the published timetable, with an 80% punctuality rate. Granted,
    : that's poor, but it's not a delay lottery, and as

    The killer though is what happens when you have a journey involving a couple of changes. One train
    being 10 mins late can make the whole journey hours later (and this has happened to me).

    Once a certain percentage of trains are late, you have to leave such large gaps for connecitons that
    the time it takes to get anywhere on the railways shoots right up. And 20% of trains being late is
    over that limit IMO.

    I'm going to have to buy a car if things get much worse. Sigh.

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  20. In news:[email protected], Arthur Clune <[email protected]> typed:
    > Ambrose Nankivell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In Britain, trains run broadly to the published timetable, with an 80% punctuality rate. Granted,
    >> that's poor, but it's not a delay lottery, and as
    >
    > The killer though is what happens when you have a journey involving a couple of changes. One train
    > being 10 mins late can make the whole journey hours later (and this has happened to me).

    Fair point. I should have remembered that since it happened to me only last week.

    > I'm going to have to buy a car if things get much worse. Sigh.

    You can always rent for the weekend when you need to. Shouldn't be much more than 60 or 70 quid a
    few times a year, which makes for a lot less than looking after one yourself.

    A
     
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