Where is the quick release on my brakes?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David Kerber, Sep 15, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    I have a Fuji Touring 2003 model, and need to remove the wheels, but can't figure out how to get
    enough slack in the brakes to do this. Where is the QR for the brakes? They are Tiagra STI's with
    Avid Shorty Canti brakes. I can't quite get enough slack to pull out the crossover cable from its
    anchor point on one of the brake shoes, and there doesn't seem to be anything in the brake levers
    where I'm used to seeing it.

    Any suggestions?

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >I have a Fuji Touring 2003 model, and need to remove the wheels, but can't figure out how to get
    >enough slack in the brakes to do this. Where is the QR for the brakes? They are Tiagra STI's with
    >Avid Shorty Canti brakes. I can't quite get enough slack to pull out the crossover cable from its
    >anchor point on one of the brake shoes, and there doesn't seem to be anything in the brake levers
    >where I'm used to seeing it.
    >
    >Any suggestions?

    There isn't one - on a Shimano road gruppo, the QR is on the caliper. Since your bike has cantis,
    you have no QR (Campy, BTW, puts 'em on the levers).

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:07:32 -0400, <[email protected]>, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >Any suggestions?

    Won't the wheel, after releasing the axle QR, move sufficiently high so the brake shoes close under
    the rim? Then you'd get enough slack in the x-over wire. You might have to deflate the tire though.
    --
    zk
     
  4. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:07:32 -0400, <[email protected]>, David Kerber
    > <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >
    > >Any suggestions?
    >
    > Won't the wheel, after releasing the axle QR, move sufficiently high so the brake shoes close
    > under the rim? Then you'd get enough slack in

    Nope. The axles are topped out in the dropouts.

    > the x-over wire. You might have to deflate the tire though.

    Now I really feel like an idiot. If I had just deflated the tire, it would have come out just fine.
    I ended up removing on of the brake arms to get the wheel off.
    Duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 14 Sep 2003 20:05:06 -0400, <[email protected]>, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >>
    >> Won't the wheel, after releasing the axle QR, move sufficiently high so the brake shoes close
    >> under the rim? Then you'd get enough slack in
    >
    >Nope. The axles are topped out in the dropouts.

    What I meant, is drop the wheel. Move the axle either forward or back, clear of the dropouts or fork
    ends and then stuff the tire up tight against whatever's stopping it. Then the rim should be above
    the brake pads so you can get slack in the X-over wire.
    --
    zk
     
  6. On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 15:09:34 +0000, Zoot Katz wrote:

    > Won't the wheel, after releasing the axle QR, move sufficiently high so the brake shoes close
    > under the rim?

    It certainly better not.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Accept risk. Accept responsibility. Put a lawyer out of _`\(,_ | business. (_)/ (_) |
     
  7. Salmoneous

    Salmoneous Guest

    Am I reading this thread correctly? Does somebody really sell a setup that doesn't allow a quick and
    brainless wheel removal?
     
  8. It seems that many of the Fuji bikes, due to their design, are this way. on my Fuji Newest, the rear
    wheel must be deflated before I can remove
    it. Mus have something to do with either short chainstays and/or angle of seat tube.

    Kerry

    salmoneous wrote:
    > Am I reading this thread correctly? Does somebody really sell a setup that doesn't allow a quick
    > and brainless wheel removal?
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > It seems that many of the Fuji bikes, due to their design, are this way. on my Fuji Newest, the
    > rear wheel must be deflated before I can remove
    > it. Mus have something to do with either short chainstays and/or angle of seat tube.

    I doubt that has anything to do with it; my Fuji Touring definitely does not have short chainstays
    or a radical seat tube angle. It's just the neither the brakes nor the levers have a QR on them. It
    looks like the brakes (Avid Shorty Canti's) were intended for systems which have QR's on the levers,
    and the levers (Tiagra STI) were intended for systems with QR's on the brakes.

    I can get them off by deflating the tire, but it's a pretty poor design, if you ask me...

    >
    > Kerry
    >
    > salmoneous wrote:
    > > Am I reading this thread correctly? Does somebody really sell a setup that doesn't allow a quick
    > > and brainless wheel removal?

    Yep.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  10. On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 08:01:48 +0000, David Kerber wrote:

    > I doubt that has anything to do with it; my Fuji Touring definitely does not have short chainstays
    > or a radical seat tube angle. It's just the neither the brakes nor the levers have a QR on them.

    My old center-pulls had Q/R's on the cable hanger. If those are still available it would solve
    the problem.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand _`\(,_ | mathematics. (_)/ (_) |
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 08:01:48 +0000, David Kerber wrote:
    >
    > > I doubt that has anything to do with it; my Fuji Touring definitely does not have short
    > > chainstays or a radical seat tube angle. It's just the neither the brakes nor the levers have a
    > > QR on them.
    >
    > My old center-pulls had Q/R's on the cable hanger. If those are still available it would solve the
    > problem.

    I'll check into that; thanks for the suggestion.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  12. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,284
    Likes Received:
    2
    Might also check into cable splitters like they have for disconnecting the cable altogether for folding bikes.
     
  13. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:07:32 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >I have a Fuji Touring 2003 model, and need to remove the wheels, but can't figure out how to get
    >enough slack in the brakes to do this. Where is the QR for the brakes? They are Tiagra STI's with
    >Avid Shorty Canti brakes. I can't quite get enough slack to pull out the crossover cable from its
    >anchor point on one of the brake shoes, and there doesn't seem to be anything in the brake levers
    >where I'm used to seeing it.
    >
    >Any suggestions?

    Having just read the entire thread (at least as much as has reached my ISP's news server), it looks
    like Sheldon is right; adjusting cantis is becoming a lost art.

    My Fuji Touring Series has Shimano STX canti's, but web pictures of the Avid Shorties look pretty
    similar. I'd lengthen the effective transverse cable by releasing the cable anchor bolt and pulling
    the cable back a couple of millimeters. You might then have to move the pads in a bit, but the
    change in geometry should allow you to easily pop off the release cable.

    When adjusting my cantis the last check is to make sure I can release the cable. If not, out with
    the allen wrenches again.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  14. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:07:32 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a Fuji Touring 2003 model, and need to remove the wheels, but can't figure out how to get
    > >enough slack in the brakes to do this. Where is the QR for the brakes? They are Tiagra STI's with
    > >Avid Shorty Canti brakes. I can't quite get enough slack to pull out the crossover cable from its
    > >anchor point on one of the brake shoes, and there doesn't seem to be anything in the brake levers
    > >where I'm used to seeing it.
    > >
    > >Any suggestions?
    >
    > Having just read the entire thread (at least as much as has reached my ISP's news server), it
    > looks like Sheldon is right; adjusting cantis is becoming a lost art.
    >
    > My Fuji Touring Series has Shimano STX canti's, but web pictures of the Avid Shorties look pretty
    > similar. I'd lengthen the effective transverse cable by releasing the cable anchor bolt and
    > pulling the cable back a couple of millimeters. You might then have to move the pads in a bit, but
    > the change in geometry should allow you to easily pop off the release cable.
    >
    > When adjusting my cantis the last check is to make sure I can release the cable. If not, out with
    > the allen wrenches again.

    If I were setting it up myself, that's what I'd to as well. However, this is a new bike (I picked it
    up two weeks ago today) and I haven't adjusted anything but the fit on it yet. I'm just swapping the
    700x32c tires for 700x25's to get a little lower rolling resistance for my daily riding and an
    upcoming race.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 20:05:06 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >> the x-over wire. You might have to deflate the tire though.
    >
    > Now I really feel like an idiot. If I had just deflated the tire, it would have come out just
    > fine. I ended up removing on of the brake arms to get the wheel off.
    > Duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!

    Hrmph...I thought the whole reason for asking was to avoid having to deflate the tire! I guess I'm
    glad I didn't reply to zoot and say that.

    That IS the usual reason for having QR brakes.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 14 Sep 2003 22:09:46 -0700, salmoneous <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Am I reading this thread correctly? Does somebody really sell a setup that doesn't allow a quick
    > and brainless wheel removal?

    Somebody probably does, but in this thread, it was not a matched, or even a single-manufacturer
    system. It was a lever made for a system whose calipers have QR, and brakes made for a system whose
    levers have QR.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  17. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:26:17 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > adjusted anything but the fit on it yet. I'm just swapping the 700x32c tires for 700x25's to get a
    > little lower rolling resistance for my daily

    The narrower tires ought to make it easy to do sans QR.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  18. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 17:45:54 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > What I meant, is drop the wheel. Move the axle either forward or back, clear of the dropouts or
    > fork ends and then stuff the tire up tight against whatever's stopping it. Then the rim should be
    > above the brake pads so you can get slack in the X-over wire.

    ...at which point, you can release the wire, and the brakes open, and you don't need to deflate the
    tire. Cool.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  19. David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    > I doubt that has anything to do with it; my Fuji Touring definitely does not have short chainstays
    > or a radical seat tube angle. It's just the neither the brakes nor the levers have a QR on them.
    > It looks like the brakes (Avid Shorty Canti's) were intended for systems which have QR's on the
    > levers, and the levers (Tiagra STI) were intended for systems with QR's on the brakes.

    I haven't used Avid Shorties, but on every canti brake I have used, I've been able to set them up
    with enough slack so that I can release the transverse cable from the brake arm. This is how it is
    supposed to work. If you can't do that, then your pads are very close to the rim, which means the
    brakes will become firm very early in the lever travel. That makes it difficult to modulate braking,
    or to get full strength braking if you have small hands. The cure is to lengthen the cable slightly.

    With road levers, there should be a threaded cable adjuster somewhere in the system, usually at the
    cable hanger. In a pinch, screwing this in gives enough slack to get the transverse cable out. I
    have seen bikes with cantis and no barrel adjusters. This is half-assed and comes from braindead
    people specing bikes who forget that mountain levers have barrel adjusters but road levers don't. If
    you have such a bike, put some adjusters inline or at the cable hangers. They'll save pain and
    suffering when setting up the brakes and when adjusting for pad wear.
     
  20. jitteringjr

    jitteringjr New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    Look at this attached picture:

    Push the brake pads together by hand to give you slack in the cables. Then push the non-insulated cable (shown with the red arrow ) out and away from the brake anchor. (shown by the yellow arrows) If you are doing this and can't get enough slack in the cable to push it through, your brakes are too tight and must be loosened. Do this by loosening the Allen screw on the right and let some cable slip through then tighten it back up.

    Hope this helps
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...