Which bike for a 7yo?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by asahitoro, Nov 30, 2003.

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  1. asahitoro

    asahitoro Guest

    I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far my
    main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for her age
    and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good bike with
    better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,

    Scott
     
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  2. > I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    > very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far my
    > main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for her
    > age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good bike
    > with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    >
    > Scott

    Scott: Don't know about the Specialized (we don't sell that line) but the TREK Mountain Track 60 is
    a very solid bike that should survive her and maybe a couple other kids afterward. But even with a
    kid's bike, the differences between one shop and another (in terms of how carefully they set it up)
    can be a bigger difference than what you find between brands.

    And, of course, color can be a big issue for kids!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    > very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far my
    > main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for her
    > age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good bike
    > with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    >
    > Scott

    I looked at two bikes for my seven year old and chose the Specialized Hotrock 20 over the Trek
    model. At the time, the Specialized had slightly better components. This was two years ago, and it's
    possible that Specialized has decontented the Hotrock by now. Either one would be fine.

    If you have a Performance shop near you also check them out as they've added some kids bikes to
    their line-up. The Performance K-2000 is about $120, though the ten speed gearing is overkill, and
    the 6-7 speed Trek and Specialized models are more than sufficient.
     
  4. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >>I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    >>very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far my
    >>main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for her
    >>age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good bike
    >>with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    >>
    >>Scott

    Scott:

    <rant> I've always wondered why kids' bikes in the US are - well, kids bikes. They're heavy,
    overburdened with "features" like suspension that most kids don't need, and for some bikes, weigh
    more than the kid. (No, I'm not kidding - read the specs and heft one of these monsters.) A riding
    buddy of mine bought a full suspension kid's bike for his kid, and it's so heavy his kid can't ride
    it for any distance. In other words, some of these bikes are toys, meant to look pretty under the
    tree and then rust in the driveway.

    I would guess the Trek and Specialized are a cut above, but still, the Trek weighs a lot - I know, I
    considered it for my 6 year old. </rant>

    Fuji makes a great kids touring bike. I can't find the link to it at the moment, but it comes with
    road tires, 20" wheels, fenders, etc. The catch is that it's sold in UK. Not in the US.

    Author makes a line of great kids bikes. I like this one:
    http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo&y=2004&z=1&idk=41&idkk=732
    http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo_popup_text&z=1&y=2004&idkk=732 20 lbs, aluminum frame, real
    functioning brakes and gears, narrower hybrid tires, beautiful. US$170. The catch? Only available in
    the Czech Republic (My 6 year old happens to have one of these. It really is a great bike.) All of
    the parts on the bike are the standard stuff - Quando hubs, Shimano shifters, etc. It's basically a
    Trek Mountain Trask 60 without the front suspension (and the weight). I even think the Trek has
    slightly better components.

    I can't figure out why a bike like this can't be sold in the US. Is it because parents (or kids)
    have featureitis and want the dual suspension super duper whammy jammy without regard to
    rideability?

    -Kamus

    --
    What am I on? I'm on my bike, o__ 6 hours a day, busting my ass. ,>/'_ What are you on? --Lance
    Armstrong (_)\(_)
     
  5. Kamus of Kadizhar <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > <rant> I've always wondered why kids' bikes in the US are - well, kids bikes. They're heavy,
    > overburdened with "features" like suspension that most kids don't need, and for some bikes, weigh
    > more than the kid. (No, I'm not kidding - read the specs and heft one of these monsters.) A riding
    > buddy of mine bought a full suspension kid's bike for his kid, and it's so heavy his kid can't
    > ride it for any distance. In other words, some of these bikes are toys, meant to look pretty under
    > the tree and then rust in the driveway.
    >
    > I would guess the Trek and Specialized are a cut above, but still, the Trek weighs a lot - I know,
    > I considered it for my 6 year old. </rant>
    >
    > Fuji makes a great kids touring bike. I can't find the link to it at the moment, but it comes with
    > road tires, 20" wheels, fenders, etc. The catch is that it's sold in UK. Not in the US.
    >
    > Author makes a line of great kids bikes. I like this one:
    > http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo&y=2004&z=1&idk=41&idkk=732
    > http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo_popup_text&z=1&y=2004&idkk=732 20 lbs, aluminum frame, real
    > functioning brakes and gears, narrower

    > hybrid tires, beautiful. US$170. The catch? Only available in the Czech Republic (My 6 year old
    > happens to have one of these. It really is a great bike.) All of the parts on the bike are the
    > standard stuff - Quando hubs, Shimano shifters, etc. It's basically a Trek Mountain Trask 60
    > without the front suspension (and the weight). I even think the Trek has slightly better
    > components.
    >
    > I can't figure out why a bike like this can't be sold in the US. Is it because parents (or kids)
    > have featureitis and want the dual suspension super duper whammy jammy without regard to
    > rideability?

    The state of kids bikes in the U.S. is appalling. It is virtually impossible to buy a kids
    road/touring bike in the U.S. You have to travel to Europe or Asia to pick one up.

    I may suggest to someone I know that imports commute bikes that he consider adding a 20" wheeled and
    a 24" wheeled model. They are widely available and there is enough demand for at least one shop in
    the U.S. to sell them.

    The Fuji trekking bikes can be seen at: "http://fujibikes.com/youth/". Look at the Lion and Tiger
    models. I would have bought one of these in a heartbeat versus a Hotrock. Alas, as the text states,
    "only available in Europe." Fuji has a lot of potential in the U.S..
     
  6. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Kamus of Kadizhar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've always wondered why kids' bikes in the US are - well, kids bikes. They're heavy,
    > overburdened with "features" like suspension that most kids don't need, and for some bikes, weigh
    > more than the kid.

    It may be heresy, but for anybody under adult size I think there's a good deal to be said for
    getting a used bike, a simple, inexpensive bike, or even a good *mart bike.

    1. Many people on this list can put together a kid's bike. It's not rocket science, especially if
    you keep the bike simple. Actually, the assembly information that came with the Murray and Huffy
    bikes I bought my daughters some years ago were substantially better than the information that
    came with the Giant Sedona I bought my younger daughter this year -- perhaps because Giant
    assumed that trained personnel would assemble it, and Murray and Huffy assumed it would be a
    parent or relatively unskilled retail help.

    2. They will outgrow it.

    3. You may tell yourself that if you get the kid a good bike, they will learn to take care of it,
    but part of being a kid is having some things that you don't have to take much care of.
     
  7. "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is
    > > a very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far
    > > my main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for
    > > her age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good
    > > bike with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    > >
    > > Scott
    >
    > Scott: Don't know about the Specialized (we don't sell that line) but the TREK Mountain Track 60
    > is a very solid bike that should survive her and maybe a couple other kids afterward. But even
    > with a kid's bike, the differences between one shop and another (in terms of how carefully they
    set
    > it up) can be a bigger difference than what you find between brands.
    >
    > And, of course, color can be a big issue for kids!
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >
    I agree that there is small difference between brands. For a neighborhood bike to use and abuse,
    they do the job. As a parent who hopes to one day tour and do club rides with his daughter, I see
    these lead pipe specials as a threat.

    I want my child to enjoy riding and later remember it as a magical and fun part of her childhood.
    Those heavy bikes virtually ensure that my daughter will be disinterested in cycling long before she
    can fit a Terry or other small woman's bike. My daughter needs a light and responsive road bike
    *now*! A single importer who would be willing to market a lighweight child's bike would be rendering
    a very valuable service to people like us!
     
  8. Dan Brussee

    Dan Brussee Guest

    On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 03:33:26 GMT, "Frank & Joni Knox" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >I agree that there is small difference between brands. For a neighborhood bike to use and abuse,
    >they do the job. As a parent who hopes to one day tour and do club rides with his daughter, I see
    >these lead pipe specials as a threat.
    >
    >I want my child to enjoy riding and later remember it as a magical and fun part of her childhood.
    >Those heavy bikes virtually ensure that my daughter will be disinterested in cycling long before
    >she can fit a Terry or other small woman's bike. My daughter needs a light and responsive road bike
    >*now*! A single importer who would be willing to market a lighweight child's bike would be
    >rendering a very valuable service to people like us!
    >

    On first blush, this seems reasonable, but a 7yo would probably not notice all that much difference
    between a low end or high end bike. I would suggest shying away from the 'mart bikes and looking for
    a low end trek, specialized, schwinn, GT, etc. 21 speeds will work fine for a couple years until she
    is ready to graduate to newer, high end stuff. The difference between an $80 'mart bike and a decent
    used Trek 800 is minor (maybe even the same) and will suit her needs much more. If you are looking
    for a road bike at 7yo, well... your options are severely limited, but the same holds true.
     
  9. Dan Brussee wrote:

    > On first blush, this seems reasonable, but a 7yo would probably not notice all that much
    > difference between a low end or high end bike.

    Given that my experience with kids is limited to my own but...

    My 6 year old is a mountain biker. I say this half seriously - I'm a roadie, and have all the grace
    and ability of a overcooked yam on a mountain bike, so I was really hoping to get her road riding.
    Alas, she gets bored after even a mile of straight road. My wife took her on a 3 mile nature trail,
    though, and from what I hear, this kid was jumping roots and had a blast. (I had my recumbent with
    me at the time, so no root jumping for me.)

    While gears, bike sophistication, geometry, etc. are lost on her - she uses two speeds, slow and
    wide open - the weight of the bike is paramount for having fun. That's where my problem with kid
    bikes available in the US lies. They're all too heavy!

    Most weigh in at 30 lbs or so. A 40 or 50 lb kid just can't muscle that kind of weight with any sort
    of enjoyment. There is no reason why someone couldn't build a sub-20lb kid's beater bike, and market
    it for under $200.

    > If you are looking for a road bike at 7yo, well... your options are severely limited, but the same
    > holds true.

    For a kid that young, putting road slicks on a 20 lb rigid frame bike will make it a road bike. Drop
    handlebars would just confuse the issue and possibly even be dangerous due to the brake lever
    placement - kids have very short fingers and reach could be an issue, since there are no kids road
    brake levers anymore...

    -Kamus

    --
    What am I on? I'm on my bike, o__ 6 hours a day, busting my ass. ,>/'_ What are you on? --Lance
    Armstrong (_)\(_)
     
  10. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Kamus of Kadizhar <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I can't figure out why a bike like this can't be sold in the US. Is it because parents (or kids)
    > have featureitis and want the dual suspension super duper whammy jammy without regard to
    > rideability?

    I can't recall the precise details of the Giant bike I bought my (quite tall, quite heavy) seven
    year old daughter for her seventh birthday in April, but I'm pretty sure from a swift web search
    that it's the rigid version of the Giant MTX225, either the '02 or the '03 model. I just went into
    the local bike shop and said ``something good for her'' and let them sort it out (and then did the
    same for myself, which kickstarted my interest in riding bikes).

    It's heavy, presumably because it's a steel frame, but it's been a raging success. The shop's simple
    statement was that suspension is pointless, heavy and unreliable at that price, which makes sense.
    Even given she's tall and strong, the seat post is pretty much right the way down, but that means
    she'll get several years of use from it. She had struggled on a previous bike with stabilisers when
    we took them off, but on the new bike (partly, I suspect, because she'd set herself the goal of
    succeeding on her new bike, and once she sets herself a target it doesn't get missed) she was riding
    it confidently within a few days. And having decent brakes is handy, as we live on a hill.

    Her first ride beyond the confines of the park at the bottom of the road was on a local cycle track
    (Rea Valley route, Birmingham-ites) and she managed a four mile round trip on that, and last weekend
    we went out for a ride with a friend and she did about six and a half miles without obvious strain,
    including several quite sharp hills, some muddy sections, and four quick laps of a semi-abandoned
    440yard running track nearby.

    I think (if such things existed easily) a bike with Rapidfire-style gears would help, as her hands
    and wrists aren't really strong enough to make using the twist-grip gears easy, but with it left on
    the smallest chain ring she's happily using a range of gears reasonably sensibly.

    ian
     
  11. Dan Brussee

    Dan Brussee Guest

    On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:02:30 -0500, Kamus of Kadizhar <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dan Brussee wrote:
    >
    >> On first blush, this seems reasonable, but a 7yo would probably not notice all that much
    >> difference between a low end or high end bike.
    >
    >Given that my experience with kids is limited to my own but...
    >
    >My 6 year old is a mountain biker. I say this half seriously - I'm a roadie, and have all the grace
    >and ability of a overcooked yam on a mountain bike, so I was really hoping to get her road riding.
    >Alas, she gets bored after even a mile of straight road. My wife took her on a 3 mile nature trail,
    >though, and from what I hear, this kid was jumping roots and had a blast. (I had my recumbent with
    >me at the time, so no root jumping for me.)
    >
    >While gears, bike sophistication, geometry, etc. are lost on her - she uses two speeds, slow and
    >wide open - the weight of the bike is paramount for having fun. That's where my problem with kid
    >bikes available in the US lies. They're all too heavy!
    >
    >Most weigh in at 30 lbs or so. A 40 or 50 lb kid just can't muscle that kind of weight with any
    >sort of enjoyment. There is no reason why someone couldn't build a sub-20lb kid's beater bike, and
    >market it for under $200.
    >
    >> If you are looking for a road bike at 7yo, well... your options are severely limited, but the
    >> same holds true.
    >
    >For a kid that young, putting road slicks on a 20 lb rigid frame bike will make it a road bike.
    >Drop handlebars would just confuse the issue and possibly even be dangerous due to the brake lever
    >placement - kids have very short fingers and reach could be an issue, since there are no kids road
    >brake levers anymore...
    >

    Agreed on the "road bike" analysis.

    As for weight, I would have to respectfully disagree. Even a 10 lb weight penalty is not all that
    much for a kid to withstand. I think the main thing is to have a well-designed, well-adjusted
    quality bike. Remember what "kids" used to ride - and be VERY happy with back in the Krate bike and
    Schwinn Varsity days. As others have said so elequently... It's not the bike!
     
  12. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 11:22:24 +0000 (UTC), Ian G Batten
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I think (if such things existed easily) a bike with Rapidfire-style gears would help, as her hands
    >and wrists aren't really strong enough to make using the twist-grip gears easy, but with it left on
    >the smallest chain ring she's happily using a range of gears reasonably sensibly.

    I don't see why it wouldn't be easy to have more appropriate shifters put on. If you can't do it
    yourself, I imagine the LBS would do it at a reasonable price.

    >ian
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  13. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I don't see why it wouldn't be easy to have more appropriate shifters put on.

    Clearly. But it's not a big issue.

    ian
     
  14. "Dan Brussee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:02:30 -0500, Kamus of Kadizhar <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Dan Brussee wrote:
    > >
    > >> On first blush, this seems reasonable, but a 7yo would probably not notice all that much
    > >> difference between a low end or high end bike.
    > >
    > >Given that my experience with kids is limited to my own but...
    > >
    > >My 6 year old is a mountain biker. I say this half seriously - I'm a roadie, and have all the
    > >grace and ability of a overcooked yam on a mountain bike, so I was really hoping to get her road
    > >riding. Alas, she gets bored after even a mile of straight road. My wife took her on a 3 mile
    > >nature trail, though, and from what I hear, this kid was jumping roots and had a blast. (I had my
    > >recumbent with me at the time, so no root jumping for me.)
    > >
    > >While gears, bike sophistication, geometry, etc. are lost on her - she uses two speeds, slow and
    > >wide open - the weight of the bike is paramount for having fun. That's where my problem with kid
    > >bikes available in the US lies. They're all too heavy!
    > >
    > >Most weigh in at 30 lbs or so. A 40 or 50 lb kid just can't muscle that kind of weight with any
    > >sort of enjoyment. There is no reason why someone couldn't build a sub-20lb kid's beater bike,
    > >and market it for under $200.
    > >
    > >> If you are looking for a road bike at 7yo, well... your options are severely limited, but the
    > >> same holds true.
    > >
    > >For a kid that young, putting road slicks on a 20 lb rigid frame bike will make it a road bike.
    > >Drop handlebars would just confuse the issue and possibly even be dangerous due to the brake
    > >lever placement - kids have very short fingers and reach could be an issue, since there are no
    > >kids road brake levers anymore...
    > >
    >
    > Agreed on the "road bike" analysis.
    >
    > As for weight, I would have to respectfully disagree. Even a 10 lb weight penalty is not all that
    > much for a kid to withstand. I think the main thing is to have a well-designed, well-adjusted
    > quality bike. Remember what "kids" used to ride - and be VERY happy with back in the Krate bike
    > and Schwinn Varsity days. As others have said so elequently... It's not the bike!
    >
    >
    This doesn't apply to kids today, at least not to girls. Kids used to go out alone and their bikes
    were for transportation to parks and the homes of friends. Many parents no longer feel comfortable
    allowing their children to do this.

    My daughter will not be leaving our yard without an adult until her middle teen years. Therefore,
    her bicycling will be entirely for enjoyment as a hobby. I have a Trek kids bike outfitted with road
    slicks, but this piece of junk is limited to sub-10 mile rides. We generally rely on her Adams
    Trail-A-Bike for anything over 10 miles. However, if she had a 15-20 lb lightweight bike this would
    not be the case.
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 16:42:14 GMT, Dan Brussee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >As for weight, I would have to respectfully disagree. Even a 10 lb weight penalty is not all that
    >much for a kid to withstand. I think the main thing is to have a well-designed, well-adjusted
    >quality bike. Remember what "kids" used to ride - and be VERY happy with back in the Krate bike and
    >Schwinn Varsity days. As others have said so elequently... It's not the bike!

    As a child riding heavy bikes in a hilly area, I was so proud when I finally accomplished a 1 mile
    ride; and I was amazed when I actually made it to the next town, maybe 2 or 2 1/2 miles down the
    road. I had those early department store mountain bikes.

    If I had bikes that didn't weigh such a significantly large percentage of my own weight, I probably
    would have been able to ride much farther. Of course, level land would have helped too.

    While "It's not the bike, it's the engine" is so true, a kid who doesn't have fun and go far and
    have something to _really_ be proud of will not want to continue bicycling. When I started
    driving, I was so happy that I'd never have to pedal again (little did I know that I'd do it again
    anyway, for fun).
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. > I've always wondered why kids' bikes in the US are - well, kids bikes. They're heavy, overburdened
    > with "features" like suspension that most kids don't need, and for some bikes, weigh more than the
    > kid. (No, I'm not kidding - read the specs and heft one of these monsters.) A riding buddy of mine
    > bought a full suspension kid's bike for his kid, and it's so heavy his kid can't ride it for any
    > distance. In other words, some of these bikes are toys, meant to look pretty under the tree and
    > then rust in the driveway.
    >
    > I would guess the Trek and Specialized are a cut above, but still, the Trek weighs a lot - I know,
    > I considered it for my 6 year old.

    Kids bikes *do* weigh a lot, but for the most part it's intentional. For most kids of that age,
    they're not going to be taking them on long rides with Mom or Dad; more typically it's around the
    neighborhood or to school and back, that sort of thing. And the simple facts are that a good number
    of them will have been left behind Mom or Dad's car and backed over, as well as many other
    unfortunate types of abuse... and the heavier bikes hold up better to that.

    Ideally, we'd have something light & cool as well, but the other issue is that we're talking about
    an industry that can barely support itself at the moment, and adding "fringe" SKUs that would sell
    great to those who post here but not do so well elsewhere... it's just not likely to happen. Wish it
    would though!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Kamus of Kadizhar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >>I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is
    > >>a very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far
    > >>my main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for
    > >>her age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good
    > >>bike with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    > >>
    > >>Scott
    >
    > Scott:
    >
    > <rant> I've always wondered why kids' bikes in the US are - well, kids bikes. They're heavy,
    > overburdened with "features" like suspension that most kids don't need, and for some bikes, weigh
    > more than the kid. (No, I'm not kidding - read the specs and heft one of these monsters.) A riding
    > buddy of mine bought a full suspension kid's bike for his kid, and it's so heavy his kid can't
    > ride it for any distance. In other words, some of these bikes are toys, meant to look pretty under
    > the tree and then rust in the driveway.
    >
    > I would guess the Trek and Specialized are a cut above, but still, the Trek weighs a lot - I know,
    > I considered it for my 6 year old. </rant>
    >
    > Fuji makes a great kids touring bike. I can't find the link to it at the moment, but it comes with
    > road tires, 20" wheels, fenders, etc. The catch is that it's sold in UK. Not in the US.
    >
    > Author makes a line of great kids bikes. I like this one:
    > http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo&y=2004&z=1&idk=41&idkk=732
    > http://www.author.cz/index.php?kolo_popup_text&z=1&y=2004&idkk=732 20 lbs, aluminum frame, real
    > functioning brakes and gears, narrower hybrid tires, beautiful. US$170. The catch? Only available
    > in the Czech Republic (My 6 year old happens to have one of these. It really is a great bike.) All
    > of the parts on the bike are the standard stuff - Quando hubs, Shimano shifters, etc. It's
    > basically a Trek Mountain Trask 60 without the front suspension (and the weight). I even think the
    > Trek has slightly better components.
    >
    > I can't figure out why a bike like this can't be sold in the US. Is it because parents (or kids)
    > have featureitis and want the dual suspension super duper whammy jammy without regard to
    > rideability?
    >
    > -Kamus
    >
    > --
    > What am I on? I'm on my bike, o__ 6 hours a day, busting my ass. ,>/'_ What are you on? --Lance
    > Armstrong (_)\(_)
     
  17. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Frank & Joni Knox" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:RqLyb.301
    >
    > My daughter will not be leaving our yard without an adult until her middle teen years.
    >

    Well, I don't know your neighborhood, and don't know your daughter, but this seems extreme.

    --
    Mike Kruger (father of 2 daughters myself)
     
  18. <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    > very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike. So far my
    > main choices are the Trek Mountain Track 60 or Specialized Hotrock 20. She's fairly tall for her
    > age and I think a 20" bike is the right size. I don't mind spending a little more on a good bike
    > with better quailty components. Are there any other bikes to look at? Thanks for any input,
    >
    > Scott
    When she's bigger there are a few bikes available. Here are some links to the coming attractions:
    http://www.feltracing.com/2004_bikes/f24.html
    http://www.tri-specialties.com/detailproduct.asp?which=600 Also, Fuji makes the ACE in a 43 cm road
    bike with 650c wheels.
     
  19. Papercut

    Papercut Guest

    "Frank & Joni Knox" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I agree that there is small difference between brands. For a neighborhood bike to use and abuse,
    > they do the job. As a parent who hopes to one day tour and do club rides with his daughter, I see
    > these lead pipe specials as a threat.
    >
    > I want my child to enjoy riding and later remember it as a magical and fun part of her childhood.
    > Those heavy bikes virtually ensure that my daughter will be disinterested in cycling long before
    > she can fit a Terry or other small woman's bike. My daughter needs a light and responsive road
    > bike *now*! A single importer who would be willing to market a lighweight child's bike would be
    > rendering a very valuable service to people like us!

    I disagree here. I rode a heavy steel bike as a youngster and never lost interest.

    I suspect most folks here are perfectly capable of putting together a decent kids bike. Probably
    limited only by budget. Smart enough to pick a good enough walmart bike and assemble it decently.
    For a bike that probably won't get the best of care and will probably be outgrown soon enough, this
    may be a good route.
     
  20. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I'm going to get my 7yo daughter a new bike and am looking for opinions on which to get. She is a
    > very good rider for her age and I think she is ready to step up to a multi-geared bike.

    I think that the best way to get your daughter on a bike that doesn't suck (and doesn't cost too
    much) would be to buy a retired BMX race bike, then add a Sturmey Archer 3-speed rear wheel and a
    front brake. Both used BMX race bikes and used S-A 3spd hubs are serious equipment that can be had
    very cheaply with plenty of usefulness left in them. You may have to repaint the frame to suit your
    kid's tastes, of course.

    "Mini" or "Junior" race bikes are smaller than full-sized or "Pro/XL" bikes, and will be fitted
    with short cranks that should suit your daughter's short legs and allow her to develop an effective
    pedal stroke.

    Chalo Colina
     
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