Which brake pads?



Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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Hi!
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I am having trouble stopping the bike on descents with traffic, especially in the rain so I was thinking of changing my brake pads.

The current set up is a pair of original tektro brake pads on the rear (which are now worn out) and the front is a pair of Dura-Ass with Ultegra holders.

Since the Dura-Ass are not worn out I will be placing those in the rear and get a new pair just for the front.


My options are:

1. Swiss Stop, black, green and blue.
2. Shimano
3. Some other various Taiwan companies, kinda unknown.
4. Maybe Aztec.


Some questions:

1. The brake blocks are standard road bike blocks, can I fit V-brake style longer pads? Is there an advantage on these? Like larger braking area or something?

2. At the moment I think I will go for the Swissstop Greens, which are for both dry and a bit better on the wet then the black ones. There are also the high-performance blue ones which are more wet - oriented but also good in the dry, but wont these ruin the rims?

3. Do the wet-oriented brake pads wear out fast? I ride alot in traffic and I use the brakes quite often.

4. Any other brands to consider? (and no, I can't get KoolStop from around here
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Thanks!
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dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
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AFAIK the only time you have a risk of the pads damaging the rim is if you use pads intended for another rim material. Pads for ceramic rims are considerably more abrasive and harder than regular pads for instance. And CF rims have another friction value and are sensitive to heat build-up and might possibly take damage from an unsuitable rim. And yes, wet-compound pads do wear a bit faster, but hey, if that's what you need, then don't argue with necessity. They only need to save you from crashing once to be an absolute bargain. There's really not much point in going to longer pads. For a certain material, friction is dependent on pressure. For the same amount of effort at the lever, a bigger pad generates less pressure. Smaller pad, higher pressure. And about equal amounts of braking force and friction.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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Fanks...
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No luck though... I was going to get some with the holders since I only have one pair of holders and they don't have any! Just the inserts. So I need to place an order and waaaaait...
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But a set of 4 with holders costs the same as a pair of complete brake blocks with pads and holders so it might be a good time to upgrade the brakes too, which the LBS says that they will help with braking performance too.


So another question:

I can get:

1. A pair of Shimano 105 brake blocks for 50 euro (with pads and holders).
2. A pair of SRAM Apex for the same price, (with Swissstop black pads and holders).


I kinda had it with Shimano so I was thinking of going for the SRAM ones. Both because I don't like the Shimano ones too much and because they are allready fitted with some Swissstop pads. But are these as "good" as the Shimano ones? Do they have the same leverage, stiffness etc as the Shimano ones???

...and no, I wont be getting the Campagnolo Centaur ones for 50 euro. It's pretty hard already finding pads for the Shimano ones, with Campagnolo I will probably need to order the pads from the web!
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alfeng

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Jul 23, 2005
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Quote:Originally Posted by Volnix . I can get 1. A pair of Shimano 105 brake blocks for 50 euro (with pads and holders).
2. A pair of SRAM Apex for the same price, (with Swissstop black pads and holders). I kinda had it with Shimano so I was thinking of going for the SRAM ones. Both because I don't like the Shimano ones too much and because they are allready fitted with some Swissstop pads. But are these as "good" as the Shimano ones? Do they have the same leverage, stiffness etc as the Shimano ones??? ...and no, I wont be getting the Campagnolo Centaur ones for 50 euro. It's pretty hard already finding pads for the Shimano ones, with Campagnolo I will probably need to order the pads from the web!
 

alfeng

Well-Known Member
Jul 23, 2005
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Quote:Originally Posted by Volnix . I can get 1. A pair of Shimano 105 brake blocks for 50 euro (with pads and holders).
2. A pair of SRAM Apex for the same price, (with Swissstop black pads and holders). I kinda had it with Shimano so I was thinking of going for the SRAM ones. Both because I don't like the Shimano ones too much and because they are allready fitted with some Swissstop pads. But are these as "good" as the Shimano ones? Do they have the same leverage, stiffness etc as the Shimano ones??? ...and no, I wont be getting the Campagnolo Centaur ones for 50 euro. It's pretty hard already finding pads for the Shimano ones, with Campagnolo I will probably need to order the pads from the web!
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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Actually... I just got a pair of 700c plastic long pads, 4 euro for the pair and they stop like a ^%^*&!
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Might get an another pair for the front, just changed the rear, the worn out ones...


Sh^^^^^^





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swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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Go for more Dura Ace pads. The 7800 pads are some of the best out there. The 7900 pads don't offer quite the stop but last longer and work a bit better in the wet. Can't say about the 9000 cause I don't have any :p

... and make sure your rims are clean and devoid of built up crud. If you've had the wheels for more than a year, chances are there's a layer of crud on there that'll be a pain in the ass to get off without some nice smelling and highly flammable chemicals. Wear rubber gloves - but not for the reasons that Camp folk use rubber gloves for. :p Take a clean cloth and give the brake track and good rub - chances are there'll be some semi-greasy residue that'll not come off with regular cleaning products. For "whoa fcuk!" levels of stopping power with good modulation, clean the brake tracks thoroughly a few times a year. Just remember to take the tires and tubes off first.

You could always scuff the top layer off your current front pads with a fairly fine file (not sandpaper or wet and dry - unless you can verify you have removed ALL of the grit from the pads afterwards) and clean the rims really well.

Personally, I'd opt for new pads for the front and new Dura Ace complete shoes/pads for the rear.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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The thing is that the front (Dura Ass) ones just don't stop fast enough. In long and steep descents they require quite alot of handwork and are just plain scary. The rims are clean but they do have about 6000km on them.

The rear ones were worn out.

I went to the shop and they would have 2 pairs of Swissstop Greens or Blues, without holders for 40 euro. (20 euro for the pair).


So I was looking for 2 pairs with holders and these would probably be even more expensive, I'm guessing around 50 euro.

A Shimaaano 105 pair of brake calipers costs around 50euro, (for the 5700 ones, in silver ofcourse coz everybody knows that the silver ones stop faster).

These allready have holders but I'm guessing they would be with the above scary Shimano rubber.


So instead of Shimano 105 5700 ones, I was checking the SRAM Apex ones, again at 50 euro for the pair, which are quite similar to the 105 5700's and are with Swissstop pads already.


But the shop ofcourse doesn't have SRAM, and ofcourse they also dont have Campy Centaur. I found some Miche Race ones, which use Campy-format pads, but the shop ofcourse doesn't have Campy Swissstop pads and I don't feel like ordering pads online...


But now, Shimaaano made the 105 5800 ones! Which are much nicer looking and their Mumbo Jumbo is much more convincing then the SRAM Apex or 105 5700 ones. Maybe a bit similar to the Centaur ones. Symmetrical with 10!, yes 10%! more stopping leverage! (Compared to an Okinawa Eel.)
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So I tried to find those and ofcourse the shop didn't have these yet.


Sooo I went and got a pair of plastic long pads, for a 700c wheel, which work fantastically so far.
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Maybe in the future I will get a pair of Shimano 5800 brakes and then after these pads wear out I will get some Swissstop ones, but I bet that Shimano is gonna have some Magnetic brakes by then which also make coffee and cook Sushi when not in motion.
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swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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Funny, cause in all the tests of brake calipers, Dura Ace 7800 and 7900 always took the win for stopping and modulation.

Maybe your subconscious backed off cause it knew the power of the brake blocks. You just need to man up and squeeze the lever harder. Feel the force. I am not your father.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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[email protected] the tests... They are usually a good indication but these brake pads are sh^t...

With the rim just cleaned they stop kinda better but on the rain they are awful.

The 2 EUR V-Brake pads stop better, faster and also have "Modulation in their modulation"! ...


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CAMPYBOB

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Sep 12, 2005
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Dawg, u needz disco brakes! All the hip cars have them.

Rim brakes in the wet have always been a trip because of the H, the 2 and the OOOOHHHHH ****!

First, no matter what fantastic hydroscopic rubber compound the pad manufacturer brags about and no matter how many CAD-designed water grooves are molded into the Flubber compound the pad still needs some amount of time (read: fast forward travel towards that car bumper just ahead of you) to squeegee the water off the rim.

The minute that happens...just about the time the YIKES! turns to My-Life-Flashing-Before-My-Eyes...the smooth as a super model's butt tire's miniscule contact patch breaks traction with the soaked road.

NO amount of lever and caliper 'modulation' is going to prevent the oncoming cross-up and my money is actually on an uber-flexible stamped steel Murray of Ohio brake caliper functioning better under such circumstances.

Hmmm...maybe you better hit Greek ePay up for some 1970's Schwinn steel rims with knurled brake tracks! Sure they chewed up brake pads in 200 miles, but they sure did grab hard in the rain.
 

swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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Volnix said:
[email protected] the tests... They are usually a good indication but these brake pads are sh^t... With the rim just cleaned they stop kinda better but on the rain they are awful. The 2 EUR V-Brake pads stop better, faster and also have "Modulation in their modulation"! ...  
I've never had an issue with Dura Ace brakes or Dura Ace pads. Obviously the full Dura Ace caliper with matching pad works best but even on the funky brakes on my Ridley the Dura Ace pads bring the stopping power! The full Dura Ace setup is just downright good. Almost too good when you move from another bike that has something else on it...
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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281
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Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB
Dawg, u needz disco brakes! All the hip cars have them.

Rim brakes in the wet have always been a trip because of the H, the 2 and the OOOOHHHHH ****!

First, no matter what fantastic hydroscopic rubber compound the pad manufacturer brags about and no matter how many CAD-designed water grooves are molded into the Flubber compound the pad still needs some amount of time (read: fast forward travel towards that car bumper just ahead of you) to squeegee the water off the rim.

The minute that happens...just about the time the YIKES! turns to My-Life-Flashing-Before-My-Eyes...the smooth as a super model's butt tire's miniscule contact patch breaks traction with the soaked road.

NO amount of lever and caliper 'modulation' is going to prevent the oncoming cross-up and my money is actually on an uber-flexible stamped steel Murray of Ohio brake caliper functioning better under such circumstances.

Hmmm...maybe you better hit Greek ePay up for some 1970's Schwinn steel rims with knurled brake tracks! Sure they chewed up brake pads in 200 miles, but they sure did grab hard in the rain.

The I doez?
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Fanks CBeezle! Safe!
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Yeah, I still miss my Roller Brake bike in the rain. They would stop even in space!
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It also had fenders! Ofcourse no-one could repair the Nexus hub so I was very happy when I managed to sell it.

Hmmm there are some steel rims around, but the new stuff are of the "prestigious" box-store quality and the used ones are ancient... Might be refurbished rust buckets too, wouldn't feel that "safe" getting those.

But since I apparently can use V-Brake style brake pads on the road calipers an since they stop so much better, I might not "pay" 50 euro for 2 pairs of pads and just get another pair of these for the front too.
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The other ones were pretty bad even in the dry, especially in long and/or steep descents my hands were starting to hurt after a point...
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