which Brands?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by mysrh, Apr 30, 2006.

  1. mysrh

    mysrh New Member

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    I decide to buy a road bike, since each person fits different bikes, I wonder if I ask about brand that I should keep eyes on, will it be appropriate?

    This would be my very first road bike, and what I want is a bike that has few negative feedbacks on its frames in particular.

    When I bike, I like to encourage myself to do more, it's like I am in race against my own expectation, so I guess I'm not really a commuter.

    read about people owning a Trek and their not so good stories.
    What I'm asking here is the quality of a bike brand for medium - long term as well as why would I want to go with aluminium or steel? So, it's basic questions.

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. Hookyrider

    Hookyrider New Member

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    I wouldn't be a stuck on brand as I would be on fit, and a ride that YOU like. Basically that means you need to get a ballpark fit job done, and start sharking shops for bikes to test ride. You should be able to tell the basic differences between different frame materials, and models within some lines of bikes. Make a list of the bikes you like, then make a budget.

    HR
     
  3. Cod

    Cod New Member

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    I bought a Specialized bike 2 years ago, and I've been very happy with it's performance. They are priced about mid-range for road bikes, depending on where you live. The model I got is a Sequoia Elite, whihc is an all-round rad/touring/commuter bike.
     
  4. mysrh

    mysrh New Member

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    Hi again, I need help for some road bike suggestions now.
    The budget is between USD$1500 (AUD$2000) - USD$2000 (AUD$2500), but I don't mind spending a bit more if it is worth it. The bike is estimated for medium to long terms.

    I like a ride where I can race against my own speed/time, so probably a long ride?

    I won't use the bike for commuting all the time, only occasionally.

    In the situation where ppl use the car lanes, I prefer using the pedestrian paths, as I never trust those car drivers. (just got thrown to the wiendshield a few weeks ago).

    Thank you for the help in advance >^-^<
     
  5. danielhaden

    danielhaden New Member

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    You said long term. Aluminum is never that.

    High performance steel is what you describe.

    Lemond steel? Rivendell?

    There are very few bikes that one could term a long term investement. If you go with aluminum, just pay half as much and throw the other half into your savings account to replace the aluminum bike when it cracks out.

    Featherweight steel is in your price range and matches the description. Titanium is also up to the job, but in a different price range. There's not really a performance difference between the high-end steel and the more-economical titanium. And, the steel will outlast them all.

    While feather steel is bendable, it is also easy to bend back into shape. It is not unusual for a bent chainstay to pop right back into place by itself. It is also repairable by ordinary means without requiring a specialist.
    It is this ability to flex, and return back undamaged, that gives the steel bike its long lasting nature.

    True high-performance steel is not compatible with clamp-on kickstands (or anything clamp-on). If you want a kickstand, make sure that the frame has (or will get) a braise on mounting plate.
     
  6. Mulligan Al

    Mulligan Al New Member

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    I was in the bike store yesterday and the sales person was telling me pretty much the same thing. He said don't get an aluminum frame, pay a bit more and go for the carbon, you won't regret it he said.
     
  7. danielhaden

    danielhaden New Member

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    Carbon fiber? Do you have good health insurance?

    Carbon fiber bikes are so very sport centric that all features, including safety, including longevity, have all been compromised in trade for speed. These become garbage after a few years.

    Yes, as a basic material, carbon fiber can hold great weight. When it does, it is heavier than aluminum. Of course the bikes are not made this way. The fiber bikes are weak as soon as the glue compounds start to release. Did you ever own any cheap furniture that was made of fiberboard and liquid nail? What happened to it when the glue started to release? Garbage.



    Titanium is in the price range of carbon fiber, but the titanium is longer lasting than carbon fiber or aluminum.


    So, if you're not going to be conservative on the price (nothing wrong with that!) do choose the Titanium, because of its high resale value.


    Nothing outlasts steel, and the same light weight is available. . .at about the same price range. ;) Lighter weight requires extremely fine grade steel. . . the strongest that exists, because it has to be thin to match the weight of the other performance bikes.

    Steel can also flex. . .instead of break. Unfortunately, resale value is low, so be sure you like the bike, or just have it custom made to fit you. ;)
     
  8. danielhaden

    danielhaden New Member

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    There's nothing wrong with buying an aluminum bike, and it is not slow.

    It is possible to compensate its flaws by using a slightly larger tire and a stem with a slightly shorter forwards extension.

    At about $600 USD, you can go just as fast and have just as much fun. For some odd reason, an aluminum bike can seriously run away from a carbon fiber bike on the downhill. That's a fun aspect.

    This class of bike is well-represented in the very fast Specialized Allez Triple.

    The reasons to purchase a bike in this class is twofold.
    1) One may ride it for two years and then strip it, sending the components to E-bay, where they will pay for 60% of the replacement bike.
    2) If one has a debt, the aluminum bike's hot performance means that you won't be missing out on any of the fun, and one can buy an all-new bike in two years that will come with all-new components. Of course, this is a form of consumerism, but it happens to be popular because it works.

    I bought an aluminum bike for none of these reasons. I just happened to give it a test drive. I thought it looked very silly, so I tested out quite a few bikes. I gave the aluminum bike another test drive. It far and away outperformed all of the others, while being much more comfortable. My first and second 10 hour rides were still met with hot performance and great comfort at the end of the ride. Yes, it does run larger tires and a short forwards extension on the stem. Yes, I know the frame won't last, but I'll miss it forever when it wears out.

    Ever gone dancing after a marathon ride?
    Aluminum: Disposable, yet wonderful.
     
  9. danielhaden

    danielhaden New Member

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    OH! I got to thinking. . .

    People that recommend tires often forget to mention their bike frames.

    Flexy or shock absorbing (feather steel and carbon fiber) use rock hard tires.

    Rigid or stout (aluminum or touring steel) use softer tires.

    Why?

    The flexy frames and carbon fiber can lose power when combined with flexy tires.

    The rigid frames can get slowed down by bouncing in a rearwards direction upon every road abberation when combined with rock-hard rigid tires.
     
  10. chitownbiker18

    chitownbiker18 New Member

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    I would totaly go with Jamis. They make a great mountian bike that dosen't last very long. As for steel or aluminum, I personally like aluminum, but for you I would suggest steel because it is heavy, prone to flex damage and overall worse. I also hate Treks. They are poorly built, fast, and cheap.
     
  11. chitownbiker18

    chitownbiker18 New Member

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    Also, go with Bontrager MTB tires. They always explode on me.
     
  12. Duracellis

    Duracellis New Member

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    Well unless you are in a very hilly area bike weight doesn’t really factor into the equation very much (except for accelerating). Aero dynamics are much more important.



    As for a frame, I have been riding a ~20 year old steal frame. It was top of the line when it was built and is comparable in weight to my friends' aluminum bikes. (They paid 1500-2000 for them CA$). I personally love my steal frame. You could even save some money (if you choose to) by buying a cheep old steal frame and upgrading the components (although they don’t make components as durable as they used to. All my friends with new bikes have had 1 problem or another with their new shimano, whereas, I have had nothing with my 20 year old dura ace)



    I suggest just getting a comfy frame with decent components and maybe a nice pair of wheels.
     
  13. chitownbiker18

    chitownbiker18 New Member

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    Have you found anything yet?
    I hope you have bad luck with your purchase.
     
  14. chitownbiker18

    chitownbiker18 New Member

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    You probably did, because you sound like an idiot.
     
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