Which cars can fit two bicycles?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Todd Strong, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Todd Strong

    Todd Strong Guest

    This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks to warrant a new thread.

    My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to be able to take our bikes
    with us when we travel. She also doesn't really like riding in my old pick-up.

    Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd like
    them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from
    the front forks, with some sort of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus
    regular travel luggage).

    Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station wagons
    (e.g. Subaru Outback).

    thanks, Todd
     
    Tags:


  2. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Todd Strong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks
    to
    > warrant a new thread.
    >
    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to
    be
    > able to take our bikes with us when we travel. She also doesn't really
    like
    > riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking
    of
    > the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from the front forks, with some
    sort
    > of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus regular travel luggage).
    >
    > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    wagons
    > (e.g. Subaru Outback).

    We recently bought a 2002 Mazda MPV, which is a marvelous vehicle. Seating for 7 with all the seats
    deployed. Or you can fold the third seat into the floor, remove one of the middle-row seats, and
    carry two or three bikes, upright with wheels on, while still keeping a seat for a third passenger
    and plenty of room for luggage.

    With its 200hp 6, 5-speed automatic, and carlike handling it's a blast to drive. Smaller footprint
    than most minivans (or SUV's); on our recent vacation ours consistently turned in 26mpg in 70mph
    Interstate driving. Quiet, comfortable, extremely high build quality.

    RichC
     
  3. On 09 Jan 2003 20:49:39 GMT, [email protected] (Todd Strong) wrote:

    >This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks to warrant a new thread.
    >
    >My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to be able to take our bikes
    >with us when we travel. She also doesn't really like riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    >Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd like
    >them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from
    >the front forks, with some sort of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus
    >regular travel luggage).
    >
    >Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    >various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station wagons
    >(e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    >thanks, Todd
    >

    My Honda Odyssey is a lot like Rich's MPV: the rear seat folds into the floor, leaving room for up
    to three bikes without taking the wheels off.

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  4. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Todd Strong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks
    to
    > warrant a new thread.
    >
    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to
    be
    > able to take our bikes with us when we travel. She also doesn't really
    like
    > riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking
    of
    > the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from the front forks, with some
    sort
    > of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus regular travel luggage).
    >
    > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    wagons
    > (e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    > thanks, Todd

    A minivan or a pickup with a cap. I had a 96 Jeep GC, and the only way I could fit two bikes
    standing up was remove the front wheel, slide the seats down, and fold the back seat down (limiting
    it to two people). Most minivans a FAR better at cargo and people space than SUV's, especially the
    small SUV's. Fitting two bikes with the back seat up was hard no matter what you took apart.

    The 4WD aspect of the SUV's creates a high floor, restricting cargo space.

    Pete
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Todd Strong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks
    to
    > warrant a new thread.
    >
    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to
    be
    > able to take our bikes with us when we travel. She also doesn't really
    like
    > riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking
    of
    > the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from the front forks, with some
    sort
    > of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus regular travel luggage).
    >
    > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    wagons
    > (e.g. Subaru Outback).

    Most aren't tall enough to stand a bike up in. But what's wrong with laying the bike down? Just fold
    the rear seat down, and lay one bike on top of another. You can use a blanket or towel to keep
    things from rubbing or scratching, if you find that's necessary. Most small station wagons will take
    two or three with no problem, as will most hatchbacks with a rear seat that folds.

    You might be able to stand a couple of bikes in the back of a small-medium sized SUV, with the front
    wheels removed. SUVs have a tall, shallow cargo area, while cars have a flat, deep one.

    I drove a small BMW for many years, with my bike in the trunk, and another either in the back seat
    or on a roof rack. No problem either way, with still plenty of room for two people's worth of cargo.

    Matt O.
     
  6. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Todd Strong writes:

    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to be able to take our bikes
    > with us when we travel. She also doesn't really like riding in my old pick-up.

    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of the front wheels, and supporting the bikes
    > from the front forks, with some sort of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels
    > (plus regular travel luggage).

    I don't care to drive a van or some other vehicle that has drayage symptoms so I have been using a
    station wagon as my family car and bicycle transport. Three different ones did the job adequately,
    transporting up to four riders, their bicycles and incidental baggage on bicycle tours that did not
    start at home. A Chevy-II, a Volvo 245, and currently a Volvo 740 wagon does the job. No rack and
    the bicycles are inside rather than outside getting a 70mph high pessure "cleaning" in the rain.
    Hey, how'd my bearings get all rusty?

    Forget about the upright and assembled bicycles. That's why we have QR wheels. On the other hand, if
    you like to drive truck, that probably rules passenger cars out.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  7. [email protected] (Todd Strong) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station wagons
    > (e.g. Subaru Outback).

    We have a Subaru Legacy (not Outback). There's a Yakima rack on top for the tandem. We usually don't
    have the tandem extension on it, so it usually just takes a single.

    We also hang bikes off the back on a standard, easy-to-remove rack.

    If you fold down the seats you can stack bikes on top of each other without removing the wheel
    (better if you do) if you want to haul them inside. There is not enough room to store them upright.

    With the racks, we have successfully hauled the tandem, two singles, and a trail-a-bike, while
    transporting 3 adults and two kids in relative comfort, with the trunk still available for gear,
    lunches, etc.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist at:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
     
  8. On Thu, 09 Jan 2003 15:49:39 -0500, Todd Strong wrote:

    > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks to warrant a new thread.
    >
    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to be able to take our bikes
    > with us when we travel. She also doesn't really like riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of the front wheels, and supporting the bikes
    > from the front forks, with some sort of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels
    > (plus regular travel luggage).

    Others have mentioned station wagons, but let me add to that. I usually carry my bikes inside in my
    wagon (Subaru Forester -- taller than some inside). I have fork mounts attached to boards, which
    just sit on top of either folded-down 1/2 rear seat. At my height, I have to pull the seat & post
    out of the frame, but with a QR lever it's not so bad. I don't like carrying bikes flat, since with
    all the other stuff, wheels, maybe another bike, etc., things can get scratched up that way. This is
    cleaner, except for the seatpost bit. If your frame is short, you might be able to leave the saddle
    on. The bike stays out of the way, and doesn't get banged up.

    Some cute-utes are taller inside, such as the new Honda CRV and Toyota RAV4, but they are shorter.
    The RAV4 in particular is so short in cargo room that it seems you can't put a bike in facing front.
    Besides, it's full-time 4WD, not AWD or equivalent, which will wear out tires and burn gas. You can
    put a bike in, with part of the rear seat folded, with both wheels and the seat still on, but it has
    to be angled sideways so putting two in is a pain. The Honda is also short, since the rear seats
    curl up in a ball and don't leave that much cargo room. It does have more height than last year, and
    probably will hold a bike with all wheels on, but again, probably only angled.

    Surprizingly, getting a real-man's SUV won't help this, plus your mileage will tank. Most SUV's
    do not have enough height to carry a bike upright with the seat in. Maybe the Ford Valdez does,
    but sheesh.

    A mini-van does a much better job of carrying bikes, to tell the truth. My wife has one of those,
    and with one of the middle seats removed I can just roll in 2-3 bikes, no problem, standing upright,
    bungeed to the handhold.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And what if you track down these men and kill them, what if you _`\(,_ | killed all of us?
    From every corner of Europe, hundreds, (_)/ (_) | thousands would rise up to take our places.
    Even Nazis can't kill that fast. -- Paul Henreid (Casablanca).
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Todd
    Strong) wrote:

    > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks to warrant a new thread.
    >
    > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to be able to take our bikes
    > with us when we travel. She also doesn't really like riding in my old pick-up.
    >
    > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of the front wheels, and supporting the bikes
    > from the front forks, with some sort of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels
    > (plus regular travel luggage).
    >
    > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station wagons
    > (e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    > thanks, Todd

    I have a 1983 Tercel 2-door hatchback. This is about as small as cars get before you head into
    Suzuki Swift and microcar territory.

    If I fold down the rear seat and pop the front wheels off, I can get two people and two bikes (laid
    flat, stacked) into the car. Cardboard seems to work well as a divider). This might be a bit
    cosmetically abusive for pretty-boy road bikes, but is not a problem for mountain bikes and my
    commuter rig.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  10. David Newman

    David Newman Guest

    A Standard Jeep Cherokee will hold two bikes upright in the back if you put the rear seat down. The
    only trick is that to make the bikes fit, you will either want to take the rear seat out entirely,
    or you will want to put the bikes in front-first, which is a bit awkward. There will be room for
    luggage as well.

    A Ford Explorer or Explorer Sport will hold three bikes and three people with the split-folding rear
    seat. In these, you can put the bikes in rear-wheel first, which is more convenient than the Jeep.
    On the other hand, you have to take the seats off the bikes, which is less convenient than the Jeep.
    With three bikes and three people, there's not much room for luggage. Two bikes and two people leave
    plenty of room for luggage. The full-size Explorer has significantly more room in back than the
    Explorer Sport.

    A Toyota RAV-4 will also hold two people and two bikes with some room for luggage if you take the
    rear seat out entirely. You don't have to take the bike seats off.

    I own the Cherokee, my Dad and brother own the Explorers, and a friend owns the RAV-4. Of these, I
    think the most convenient one for bike hauling is the RAV-4. These vehicles have other advantages
    and disadvantages, so this one point would not make the decision for me. If I were you, I would load
    clean a bike up real good, put it in my car and go visit the dealers of the cars and trucks I was
    interested in, and ask for permission to try putting the bike in the cars to see how they fit.
    That's how my buddy chose the RAV-4, and I'll follow that plan the next time I go car-shopping.

    >>Dave
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    13 Jan 2003 18:29:59 -0800,
    <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote:

    >With the racks, we have successfully hauled the tandem, two singles, and a trail-a-bike, while
    >transporting 3 adults and two kids in relative comfort, with the trunk still available for gear,
    >lunches, etc.

    That's cruel and unusual punishment. What would happen if you suddenly had to traverse a receding
    glacier and cross a mudslide to save an otter! Clearly you need an SUV!
    --
    zk
     
  12. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > A mini-van does a much better job of carrying bikes, to tell the truth. My wife has one of those,
    > and with one of the middle seats removed I can just roll in 2-3 bikes, no problem, standing
    > upright, bungeed to the handhold.

    The decline of the minivan's popularity, given that it's probably the most all-around practical
    vehicle design of them all, is a bone-chilling demonstration of the power of marketing, IMO.

    The last leg of our recent vacation took us through several hundred miles of winter weather in
    western Virginia, West Virginia, and PA (we were coming from Charlotte NC to Philadelphia). The
    number of 4WD vehicles involved in accidents and littering the side of the road was ample
    demonstration that there are few situations in modern real-world US driving where SUV's offer a real
    advantage -- and the number of them we saw being driven dangerously was ample demonstration that a
    stupid driver in a big, heavy vehicle is simply a more dangerous stupid driver.

    For the things most families need to accomplish with their vehicles, SUV's are just uneconomical,
    noisy, and relatively unsafe station wagons. Most of the larger ones seem to be fairly unreliable as
    well. Our MPV, by contrast, carries more people and cargo, can tow a 5000 pound trailer, gets much
    better gas mileage, includes airbags and traction control, was delivered in (and remains in) perfect
    working order, and at $21k fully equipped was cheaper than most SUV's.

    RichC
     
  13. Pete wrote:

    > > transporting bikes in various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    > wagons
    > > (e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    > A minivan or a pickup with a cap.

    Carried 9 bikes out to Iowa with me last summer for RAGBRAI in pickup with cap. Six inside (along
    with all the camping gear and clothes) and three on a bike rack outside.

    No exactly a small SUV or station wagon.

    Station wagons are a vanishing breed. Toyota (still???), VW, Mercedes, BMW, Volvo, and Ford (Taurus)
    come to mind (along with the Subaru).

    Minivans would probably be the best balance of room and economy.

    SMH
     
  14. Jim Boyer

    Jim Boyer Guest

    "Ken Steinhoff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 09 Jan 2003 20:49:39 GMT, [email protected] (Todd Strong) wrote:
    >
    > >This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof racks
    to
    > >warrant a new thread.
    > >
    > >My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to
    be
    > >able to take our bikes with us when we travel. She also doesn't really
    like
    > >riding in my old pick-up.
    > >
    > >Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    > >like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking
    of
    > >the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from the front forks, with
    some sort
    > >of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus regular travel luggage).
    > >
    > >Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > >various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    wagons
    > >(e.g. Subaru Outback).
    > >
    > >thanks, Todd
    > >
    >
    > My Honda Odyssey is a lot like Rich's MPV: the rear seat folds into the floor, leaving room for up
    > to three bikes without taking the wheels off.
    >
    >
    >
    I second this vote. We also get 3 unassembled full size road bikes and a 4th with the front wheel
    off in the Odyssey van . This leaves us 4 passenger seats for the adults. There is still room for
    gear. The space is incredible and the time to load and unload and start riding is minimal.

    jb
     
  15. Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > 13 Jan 2003 18:29:59 -0800,
    > <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote:
    >
    > >With the racks, we have successfully hauled the tandem, two singles, and a trail-a-bike, while
    > >transporting 3 adults and two kids in relative comfort, with the trunk still available for gear,
    > >lunches, etc.
    >
    > That's cruel and unusual punishment. What would happen if you suddenly had to traverse a receding
    > glacier and cross a mudslide to save an otter! Clearly you need an SUV!

    But the Legacy has AWD, so, according to their advertising, I should be able to traverse the
    receding glacier (if not cross the mudslide) to save the otter.

    What's the best part of the Legacy is that it has a stick shift. That way, when I'm transporting the
    kids to their piano lessons in the family station wagon, I can feel like Maria Andretti, heh heh.

    Warm regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist at:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
     
  16. Mark

    Mark Guest

    My Nissan Xterra holds two bikes inside with the Nissan expensive rack. with a build your your own,
    angled(and cheap) rack it would hold three easily with room for gear.

    --
    mark Outside a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog it is too dark to read - Groucho
    Marx xes out for mail "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Todd Strong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > This seems like enough of a shift from the recent thread about roof
    racks
    > to
    > > warrant a new thread.
    > >
    > > My sweetie pie is planning on buy a new vehicle. She and I would like to
    > be
    > > able to take our bikes with us when we travel. She also doesn't really
    > like
    > > riding in my old pick-up.
    > >
    > > Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two
    bicycles
    > > inside? Ideally, I'd like them both to stand upright. I anticipate
    taking
    > of
    > > the front wheels, and supporting the bikes from the front forks, with
    some
    > sort
    > > of hardware. This means also having room for the two wheels (plus
    regular
    > > travel luggage).
    > >
    > > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading
    and
    > > transporting bikes in various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station
    > wagons
    > > (e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    > We recently bought a 2002 Mazda MPV, which is a marvelous vehicle. Seating for 7 with all the
    > seats deployed. Or you can fold the third seat into the floor, remove one of the middle-row seats,
    > and carry two or three bikes, upright with wheels on, while still keeping a seat for a third
    > passenger
    and
    > plenty of room for luggage.
    >
    > With its 200hp 6, 5-speed automatic, and carlike handling it's a blast to drive. Smaller footprint
    > than most minivans (or SUV's); on our recent vacation ours consistently turned in 26mpg in 70mph
    > Interstate driving. Quiet, comfortable, extremely high build quality.
    >
    > RichC
     
  17. Claire Petersky wrote:
    >
    > [email protected] (Todd Strong) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > > Would like to hear people's personal experiences in loading/unloading and transporting bikes in
    > > various small SUVs (e.g. Toyota RAV4) or station wagons
    > > (e.g. Subaru Outback).
    >
    > We have a Subaru Legacy (not Outback).

    The Outback and Legacy wagon are identical space-wise, inside and out.

    I have an '01 Outback, and my inlaws have an '02 Legacy wagon.

    Barry
     
  18. Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > 13 Jan 2003 18:29:59 -0800,
    > <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote:
    >
    >>With the racks, we have successfully hauled the tandem, two singles, and a trail-a-bike, while
    >>transporting 3 adults and two kids in relative comfort, with the trunk still available for gear,
    >>lunches, etc.
    >
    > That's cruel and unusual punishment. What would happen if you suddenly had to traverse a receding
    > glacier and cross a mudslide to save an otter! Clearly you need an SUV!

    It is a seal Zoot, a seal.
     
  19. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 14 Jan 2003 21:40:35 GMT, <[email protected]>, Mike Latondresse
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Zoot Katz <[email protected]com> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> 13 Jan 2003 18:29:59 -0800,
    >> <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote:
    >>
    >>>With the racks, we have successfully hauled the tandem, two singles, and a trail-a-bike, while
    >>>transporting 3 adults and two kids in relative comfort, with the trunk still available for gear,
    >>>lunches, etc.
    >>
    >> That's cruel and unusual punishment. What would happen if you suddenly had to traverse a receding
    >> glacier and cross a mudslide to save an otter! Clearly you need an SUV!
    >
    >It is a seal Zoot, a seal.

    In the text version it's an otter, but I did happen to catch that seal one while visiting a friend
    with a TV.

    I should have known Claire was prepared to meet the task. But, she couldn't have also stopped off on
    the way home to pick up those materials for the deck project and two new ponies for the kids!

    The latest GMC WWII one gagged me Sunday. I guess that now anything less than a Unimog is
    for poseurs.

    My former spouse's Suzuki Swift carried a standard 6-8 x 2-6 hollow-core door completely inside with
    a passenger and the hatchback closed. Two bikes, two adults and their gear would have fit (after
    delivering the door) by using the same method as Ryan's Tercel.
    --
    zk
     
  20. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    >> Any recommendations on which vehicles can fairly easily hold two bicycles inside? Ideally, I'd
    >> like them both to stand upright. I anticipate taking of
    In article <[email protected]>, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a 1983 Tercel 2-door hatchback. This is about as small as cars get before you head into
    >Suzuki Swift and microcar territory.
    >
    >If I fold down the rear seat and pop the front wheels off, I can get two people and two bikes (laid
    >flat, stacked) into the car. Cardboard seems

    The people and the bikes laid flat and stacked?

    >to work well as a divider). This might be a bit cosmetically abusive for pretty-boy road bikes, but
    >is not a problem for mountain bikes and my commuter rig.

    I have a Corolla, no fold-down seat, no hatchback. I remove the wheels, and put one bike in the back
    seat, and the other in the trunk. People sit in the front seats. Enough room for luggage as well. It
    only takes 30 seconds to re-assemble the bikes.

    I think that all this discussion shows that just about any car can cary 2 bicycles, so do your
    car-choosing on other parameters.

    -Pete
    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 90% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
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