Which Frame?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul Westall, Apr 6, 2003.

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  1. Paul Westall

    Paul Westall Guest

    Thanks for the useful replies to my previous posts. I'm currently researching/shopping for a road
    bike-tired of switching tires on my MTB (good excuse for a new bike anyway). I would appreciate any
    comments on the bikes I am considering, as well as any ohters I may ot know about. Price range is
    less than $2000 for whole bike. Colnago classic or Assos DeRosa Neo Primato or Team Habernero road
    frame Basso Gap (least likely) or Bianchi veloce Originally I was only consideing steel, but after
    reading Sheldon Brown's page on frame myths, I am also considering aluminum. Unfortunately I don't
    live near a major city, so test riding each bike is pretty much impossible. TIA Paul
     
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  2. Frank121

    Frank121 Guest

    Complete Landshark with Ultegra components for less than $2000 from www.gvhbikes.com

    "Paul Westall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks for the useful replies to my previous posts. I'm currently researching/shopping for a road
    > bike-tired of switching tires on my MTB (good excuse for a new bike anyway). I would appreciate
    > any comments on the bikes I am considering, as well as any ohters I may ot know about. Price range
    > is less than $2000 for whole bike. Colnago classic or Assos DeRosa Neo Primato or Team Habernero
    > road frame Basso Gap (least likely) or Bianchi veloce Originally I was only consideing steel, but
    > after reading Sheldon Brown's page on frame myths, I am also considering aluminum. Unfortunately I
    don't
    > live near a major city, so test riding each bike is pretty much
    impossible.
    > TIA Paul
     
  3. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    It depends on what you're going to be using the bike for, the type of terrain and roads you will be
    riding, etc. For example, if you're planning on doing 120 mile rides in a hilly rural area with some
    dirt or gravel roads, then a racing bike with 20 mm tires, a 11-21 cassette and 53/39 chainwheels,
    and a saddle 6 inches higher than the bars may not be the best choice. If you're going to train for
    and race criteriums, OTOH, such a bike may suit you well.

    Assuming you're not in the 1% of American bike riders who race, your options are sadly somewhat
    limited. Most road bikes are aimed at people who race or want to look like they do. Fortunately the
    times are changing, with bike manufacturers realizing that the road bike market is broader (in more
    ways than one) than racers.

    You may wish to consider looking at Rivendell's Romulus bike and Rambouillet frame (which you can
    get built up); the Romulus would set you back well under $2000 and the Rambouillet could be built up
    for about that. Heron Bicycles are wonderful bikes, available built up and very very good value for
    money (my wife has one of these and loves
    it). Gunnar makes some great frames and I think you can get them built up. Last but not least, you
    can get Ti for steel prices from Habanero. BTW, the owners of Heron and Habanero are both
    frequent contributors to the rec.bikes newsgroups and are always worth reading.

    www.rivendellbicycles.com www.heronbicycles.com www.gunnarbikes.com www.habcycles.com
     
  4. Mark Wolfe

    Mark Wolfe Guest

    I just built up a steel 1990 Paramount, updated components with a full Waterford restore, changed
    spacing for 9spd, and relocated the rear brake cable guids to 7 oclock. I love the ride, and it was
    a fraction of a new one. I happened on the frameset for $100 though. :) If I were to do it again,
    I'd probably build up a Rambouillet from Rivendell, or just do a Rivendell. I may be selling a Caad
    3 Cannondale soon, San Diego area. :)

    Tim McNamara wrote:

    > It depends on what you're going to be using the bike for, the type of terrain and roads you will
    > be riding, etc. For example, if you're planning on doing 120 mile rides in a hilly rural area with
    > some dirt or gravel roads, then a racing bike with 20 mm tires, a 11-21 cassette and 53/39
    > chainwheels, and a saddle 6 inches higher than the bars may not be the best choice. If you're
    > going to train for and race criteriums, OTOH, such a bike may suit you well.
    >
    > Assuming you're not in the 1% of American bike riders who race, your options are sadly somewhat
    > limited. Most road bikes are aimed at people who race or want to look like they do. Fortunately
    > the times are changing, with bike manufacturers realizing that the road bike market is broader (in
    > more ways than one) than racers.
    >
    > You may wish to consider looking at Rivendell's Romulus bike and Rambouillet frame (which you can
    > get built up); the Romulus would set you back well under $2000 and the Rambouillet could be built
    > up for about that. Heron Bicycles are wonderful bikes, available built up and very very good value
    > for money (my wife has one of these and loves
    > it). Gunnar makes some great frames and I think you can get them built up. Last but not least, you
    > can get Ti for steel prices from Habanero. BTW, the owners of Heron and Habanero are both
    > frequent contributors to the rec.bikes newsgroups and are always worth reading.
    >
    > www.rivendellbicycles.com www.heronbicycles.com www.gunnarbikes.com www.habcycles.com

    --
    Mark Wolfe http://www.wolfenet.org gpg fingerprint = 42B6 EFEB 5414 AA18 01B7 64AC EF46 F7E6 82F6
    8C71 "Your fault: core dumped" -- MegaHAL
     
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