Which groupset?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David12345, Aug 13, 2019 at 6:45 AM.

  1. David12345

    David12345 New Member

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    Hi All

    Does anyone have any opinions on whether it is better to buy a new bike with Ultegra Di2 or Dura Ace mechanical please?

    I know it's personal preference etc but just wanting to get some feedback. I enjoy cycling, cycle twice a week outside (and another 2-3x indoors), do 70-100 mile sportives and like the odd Strava segment challenge. I'm not an elite cyclist but I have the option of two near identical bikes from the same manufacturer where the key difference is the groupset.

    It is actually pretty difficult to get a test ride on bike my way as many local bike shops don't permit test riding due to mechanic's time building and stripping the bikes and having to put the unwanted bike back in stock as used. So I know this is a good idea but again, just wanting opinions at the mo.

    Thanks in advance :)
     


  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I know I'm going to be the odd duck out because everyone is attracted to the newest gee wiz crap as soon as it comes out, i'm not!

    I would go with Ultegra mechanical, it's bulletproof, every once in awhile you do have to replace cables, but it shouldn't be once a year, I've had my cables on my bike since 2013 when I got the bike and their still fine! I do know how to keep in eye on that stuff so I'll be able to tell when the time is right to replace them; I know I'll hear the screams of those who replace theirs every season, and that's fine, but I've doing it the way I been doing it for 45 years and never had a cable break, just a bit of lube on the cable where it goes into the housing and they keep working great for a long time. So for those that will be screaming about Di2 advantage of not having to replace cables every year all I have to say is BS! And another BS call goes out to those that say mechanicals always have to be adjusted, again I got my last new bike in 2013 and so far I have yet to readjust the derailleurs, which is on par with my older SIS and Friction stuff, I never have have to readjust till I put new cables on and after about first 300 miles of putting on new cables it might need minor tweaking after that no more fiddling around with it.

    Di2 systems are not without their issues, the battery only last about 2 to 3 years before needing replacing (which Shimano says is necessary that frequently, and the battery cost $120 or so, a set of Shimano Dura Ace cables around $60 and that's for the good stuff), which is a crappy battery since it may only recharge about 6 to 10 times during that period of time when rechargeable cell phone and tool batteries can go at least 500 times, but that's Shimano for you, and here's more that Shimano doesn't tell people: https://road.cc/content/feature/253498-stuff-they-never-tell-you-about-electronic-shifting Rough roads can cause wires to come undone which is what happened to Thibaut Pinot and Peter Sagan during TDF races, while you don't have to worry about losing a race you do have to worry about how you're going to get home, but I think the new wireless systems will eliminate that problem but turn around and give you another battery to worry about. There has been a lot of issues with the system just quitting, here is what you need to do if it does: https://www.reddit.com/r/bikewrench/comments/4pacpq/di2_stopped_working_completely_in_the_middle_of/ I'm sorry but mechanical systems just don't stop working, and any repair is far simpler than what is explained in that discussion, plus any mechanical repair can be done in the field not likely with electronic. This is a funny video but makes serious points:

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9uiFejyTbo
    Another issue:

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrkH2bIKrK0


    Of course there are advantages to elect shifting, it does shift precise when it's working as it should. Some say there is an advantage that it can shift many gears at the same time, big deal, SIS and Friction did that for years! Some will say minimal maintenance, that's a tie, well sort of, like I said before a battery cost more than a set of cables, but once the Di2 system is working it's trouble free just as the mechanical system is.

    Look, I like things simple, simpler stuff breaks down less frequently because there is less to go wrong. I also don't like the idea of riding 50 miles from home and having a problem I can't fix on the side of the road, I hate the feeling of having to call my wife to come get me because of some problem. I'm an independent guy, I owned a business in the past and own another one now, I don't like relying on people to do my stuff for me when I should be able to do it myself, and that's the way I am with my wife, I don't treat her like she's my mommy.

    Again let me repeat, this is only my opinion, others will chime in to refute all that I've said and that's fine, I'm not going to refute any of it and cause a big argument here, it's just their opinion, neither are right or wrong, just opinion.

    By the way, I actually prefer Shimano 105 front derailleur and Ultegra rear with 105 brifters, 105 is very rugged and will last a very long time, Ultegra shifts the rear just a tiny bit better, but the rest can be all 105 and you won't tell the difference especially if you use DA cables.
     
  3. phillman5

    phillman5 New Member

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    I am not sure which video is from Cyclintom, but I disagree with the top/longer video. Its been my experience that with a system that is both mechanical and electronic, it is the mechanical part that will wear/break and not the electronic part. I got SRAM eTap, only because that is what came on the Ti bikes from the cheap dealer, spent $3,000 for whole bike. What I like, no shift cables, makes the bike very clean. Each derailed has its own small battery and they are interchangeable. I now just carry an extra battery. As for the wireless shifters, those batteries have lasted three years, and I replaced them just on general principal, not that the led was red. I get more than a month/charge on the main batteries, and I rotate the front/rear/spare, and very nicely the Garmin edge 830 gives me a warning on low derailer battery and tells me what gear I am in so I don't need to look down and back to see, loosing focus on the road ahead. Though I am flabbergasted that when I ride I have 11 batteries on the bike. I've gone down three times, once very hard, derailed hanger bent pretty well, and the detailers show some scrapes, but are still working well.
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    cyclintom is an old guy in his 70's suffering from dementia or some such problem which he admitted to some time back here on this forum, so I don't think any of those are his videos. And Cyclintom didn't like CF bikes, nor did he like Chinese made bikes which leaves out the second video.

    I know that electronic shifting is all the rage so I won't go any more into running it down. People like technology and this offers that appeal, so to each their own; like I said before I like thing that are simple. It's sort of like the new Silca pump, it's bluetooth! yes, you can tie the pump to your phone so when you're inflating your tire you can see the PSI being displayed on the phone...and why do I need that when a simple gauge on the pump would have worked the same and cheaper plus I don't have to fetch my phone to see the PSI? if you're going through all that hassle you might as well use a stand alone mechanical psi gauge! I think that pump is a retarded idea, but all the techies will rush out and buy it. I had the same problem with bike computers that showed what gear you were in, like I didn't already know! or don't care because I'm in whatever gear that gives me my proper cadence!

    Some technology is just a waste of money, and some isn't like GPS's that can direct you from address to address with turn by turn instructions, beats a paper map hands down! Though obviously I do know how to use a paper map because I used those for at least 30 years, but prefer the GPS now, though when I'm on the bike touring I still use a paper map because I haven't found a bike specific GPS with address to address and turn by turn stuff that I've liked yet at a price I'm willing to pay, I don't understand why I have to pay at least $350 more for a bike GPS vs one I can buy for the car! Can you say gouging the cycling community?
     
  5. phillman5

    phillman5 New Member

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    1) 1000% agree about the pump with BT. Do you need to have a history of how high a pressure you pumped your tires? That just seems so ludicrous. And more of a pain, and more to go wrong, than a pump with a built in gauge.

    2) I had a bad accident last year, something distracted me, and when I refocused I hit a fairly large object in the middle of the road, it was a winding mountain decent. I occasionally check down to see what gears I am in, mainly to see "Do I have one more", and often I try to push it, "Am I one gear smaller climbing this hill than last time". So having the gears shown on the computer is a little more handy. To each his own on this.

    3) Yes, the Edge 830 is expensive, but I find its 1000% better than the 2015 Honda built in Nav system I am pretty sure I paid much more for.
     
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