Which Make of Hybrid Should I Go for?



Status
Not open for further replies.
M

Michael D

Guest
It's time for me to treat myself to a new bike. I use it mainly for commuting across London to work
& want to buy another hybrid (as I always end up carrying a fair bit of stuff). I never really go
off road - only the odd track.

I'm going to go to my LBS (as they're very helpful & knowledgeable). They stock Ridgeback, Trek &
Specialized. My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids? (By good I mean well
designed and well built). Are these makes the Ford Mondeo's of the bicycle world (ie dull but
reasonably dependable) or the Skoda (used to be **** but now surprisingly good) or something a bit
more exciting …

And who would be the Rolls Royce or Ferrari of the hybrid world (if such a thing exists)?

Any advice / experience welcome?

Michael
 

dannyfrankszzz

New Member
Mar 8, 2003
217
0
0
43
From my experience, Ridgeback are a reliable and cheap make. Just make sure that you get a decent groupset i.e. brakes, gears, chainset etc - Shimano Deore or above - especially if you're cycling around London, you'll be using the brakes a lot and the hand mechanism tends to knacker quite quickly. Good luck.

Originally posted by Michael D
It's time for me to treat myself to a new bike. I use it mainly for commuting across London to work
& want to buy another hybrid (as I always end up carrying a fair bit of stuff). I never really go
off road - only the odd track.

I'm going to go to my LBS (as they're very helpful & knowledgeable). They stock Ridgeback, Trek &
Specialized. My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids? (By good I mean well
designed and well built). Are these makes the Ford Mondeo's of the bicycle world (ie dull but
reasonably dependable) or the Skoda (used to be **** but now surprisingly good) or something a bit
more exciting …

And who would be the Rolls Royce or Ferrari of the hybrid world (if such a thing exists)?

Any advice / experience welcome?

Michael
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Michael D wrote:

> I'm going to go to my LBS (as they're very helpful & knowledgeable).=20 They stock Ridgeback, Trek
> & Specialized. My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids? (By good I mean well
> designed and well built). Are these makes the Ford Mondeo's of the bicycle world (ie dull but
> reasonably dependable) or the Skoda (used to be **** but now surprisingly good) or something a bit
> more exciting =85

If I were to spend =A32-400 on a single bike to just about everything fro= m=20 new, it would very
probably be a Ridgeback hybrid, maybe a Dawes. I=20 don't own one but from what I've seen and heard
they're well built and=20 sensibly specced bits of kit that do what they say "on the tin". Above=20
the =A3400 level I'd probably go for something like a Dawes Horizon toure= r=20 in last year's
colour to start, then other tourers like the Sardar and=20 Galaxy.

> And who would be the Rolls Royce or Ferrari of the hybrid world (if such a thing exists)?

The Ferrari might be taken as something like the Ridgback Genesis=20 series: racing bikes with flat
bars, more or less. For the Roller, that =

would be a custom build.

Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
W

W K

Guest
"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

The Ferrari might be taken as something like the Ridgback Genesis series: racing bikes with flat
bars, more or less. For the Roller, that would be a custom build.

<me>Ah, but a real roller or ferrari would come with a different motor.

Would you really trade up from a fiesta to a ferrari if you had to keep the same old 1.5l
Diesel motor?
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
W K wrote:

> Ah, but a real roller or ferrari would come with a different motor.
>
> Would you really trade up from a fiesta to a ferrari if you had to keep the same old 1.5l
> Diesel motor?

There are probably people that would if it included a sound system to simulate the hearty roar of a
Ferrari V12! ;-)

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
S

Smudger

Guest
"Michael D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> It's time for me to treat myself to a new bike. I use it mainly for commuting across London to
> work & want to buy another hybrid (as I always end up carrying a fair bit of stuff). I never
> really go off road - only the odd track.
>
> I'm going to go to my LBS (as they're very helpful & knowledgeable). They stock Ridgeback, Trek &
> Specialized. My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids? (By good I mean well
> designed and well built). Are these makes the Ford Mondeo's of the bicycle world (ie dull but
> reasonably dependable) or the Skoda (used to be **** but now surprisingly good) or something a bit
> more exciting .
>
> And who would be the Rolls Royce or Ferrari of the hybrid world (if such a thing exists)?
>
> Any advice / experience welcome?
>
> Michael

I have a Ridgeback. Exceptional ride and handling. I have had a problem with the frame which I
believe to be a rare if not unique issue and Madison, the importers, have given brilliant
customer service.
 
T

Tim Dunne

Guest
"Michael D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

8<...

I love my Ridgeback hybrid. Cracking bikes.

Tim

--
Sent from Brum, UK... ...scheduled completion Sept 2003 'What's keeping the White House white? Is it
chalk, is it fog, is it fear?' Steve Skaith, 'America For Beginners' Look, mum, an anorak on a bike!
Check out www.nervouscyclist.org
 
J

John Scott

Guest
I'll stick in my penny's worth, I have a 2002 Trek hybrid 7700FX and I have travelled thousands of
miles on it without any problems, it is a great bike, the 2003 model is more of a atb where as the
model I have is more a road bike with flat handlebars and slightly thicker tyres(35mm) . But trek
make good reliable bikes.

"Michael D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> It's time for me to treat myself to a new bike. I use it mainly for commuting across London to
> work & want to buy another hybrid (as I always end up carrying a fair bit of stuff). I never
> really go off road - only the odd track.
>
> I'm going to go to my LBS (as they're very helpful & knowledgeable). They stock Ridgeback, Trek &
> Specialized. My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids? (By good I mean well
> designed and well built). Are these makes the Ford Mondeo's of the bicycle world (ie dull but
> reasonably dependable) or the Skoda (used to be **** but now surprisingly good) or something a bit
> more exciting .
>
> And who would be the Rolls Royce or Ferrari of the hybrid world (if such a thing exists)?
>
> Any advice / experience welcome?
>
> Michael
 
R

Richard

Guest
Peter Clinch wrote:

> There are probably people that would if it included a sound system to simulate the hearty roar of
> a Ferrari V12! ;-)

My Escort 1.3 simulated the hearty roar of a Ferrari V12 when its exhaust was blowing. The slipping
clutch simulated the motion of a wheelspinning start off the line without burning rubber (nasty
icky smell).

:)

R.
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Richard wrote:

> My Escort 1.3 simulated the hearty roar of a Ferrari V12 when its exhaust was blowing.

When my 2.3l Volvo's went it sounded more like the 8th Air Force taking off with full bomb load,
never mind a mere Ferrari!

MOT coming up and it isn't going to be worth the cost (16 years and 200K miles old, now degrading in
many places), so after today I'll be a car-free chap again for a while. It's been very useful but
I've built up sufficient canoe and sea kayak carrying credit to let someone else cart mine about for
a while and in the meantime I'll save a shitload of cash. Should I spend it on a hot new 'bent, an 8
Freight or another holiday is the question...

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
W

W K

Guest
"Richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Peter Clinch wrote:
>
> > There are probably people that would if it included a sound system to simulate the hearty roar
> > of a Ferrari V12! ;-)
>
> My Escort 1.3 simulated the hearty roar of a Ferrari V12 when its exhaust was blowing. The
> slipping clutch simulated the motion of a wheelspinning start off the line without burning rubber
> (nasty icky smell).

Ah well, a small hill of only 400 metres makes me look as if I've just climbed mont ventoux.
 
S

Steve

Guest
> >My question is really how good are these makes for hybrids?

I have a Specialized Sirrus Comp and it is great for commuting. For me it was a toss up 'tween mine
or a Ridgeback Genesis. I went for mine because of the extra lugs for bottle cages under the down
tube and also low rider lugs on the forks, so I can always use it for weekend touring (yeah right -
it sounds a good idea!) I got the impression the the Ridgeback was a faster machine as it is just a
road bike with flat bars. It has roadie brakes, Tiagra, etc., instead of Vees and Deore, etc. Mine
is plenty fast enough for me as i lug panniers and mudguards around anyway, and I also got it almost
half price as it was last years model.

Steve
 
M

Michael D

Guest
Thanks for the comments so far. It seems that Ridgeback is less 'average' than I'd thought. Maybe
more of an Audi than a Ford Mondeo?. I'd thought that Specialised (or maybe Trek) were the better
makes, probably as I'd seen Lance Armstrong on a Specialised in the TdF (& let's be honest - the
fact that he rides one has more or less naff all relevance to it being right for me commuting
around London).

I like the idea of the 'fast' hybrids like the Specialised Sirrus & Ridgeback Genesis. I'm just
concerned as to whether they're tough enough for a daily commute in all weathers & with up to
about a stone in my panniers. Has anyone got any experience with these for a (heavily loaded)
daily commute?

(I forgot to put in my original post that I'm probably looking to spend around £400 - £600).

Michael
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
"Michael D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I'd thought that Specialised (or maybe Trek) were the better makes, probably as I'd seen Lance
> Armstrong on a Specialised in the TdF (& let's be honest - the fact that he rides one has more or
> less naff all relevance to it being right for me commuting around London).

I thought he rode a Trek OCLV? And an off the shelf one at that. (not a cheap shelf, mind - but not
custom either.)

cheers, clive
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Michael D wrote:

> I like the idea of the 'fast' hybrids like the Specialised Sirrus & Ridgeback Genesis. I'm just
> concerned as to whether they're tough enough for a daily commute in all weathers & with up to
> about a stone in my panniers. Has anyone got any experience with these for a (heavily loaded)
> daily commute?

No direct experience but I don't see why not. OTOH, if you'll be=20 carting loads in all weathers
covering a sports machine in the sensible=20 paraphenalia for that seems a bit silly...

> (I forgot to put in my original post that I'm probably looking to spend around =A3400 - =A3600).

=2E.. while something like a Dawes Horizon has it all built on straight=20
from stock and is designed with that sort of thing in mind. Only gotcha =

is if you have problems with drop bars Something to spend your change on would be a dynamo hub
lighting system, =

again a bit odd on a sports machine but right at home on a tourer.

Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
M

Michael D

Guest
Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:

> if you'll be carting loads in all weathers covering a sports machine in the sensible paraphenalia
> for that seems a bit silly...
>

That's a good point & one that had come to me before in a more lucid moment. There's not much point
spending extra on shaving the odd pound off here or there only to negate it all by carrying laptop,
clothes, food etc and then having to stop for lights every 100 yards.

I think in my head I know you're right - but my heart sees me on something altogther more fast
& exciting.

Michael
 
J

J-P.S

Guest
On 13 Mar 2003 09:53:02 -0800, Michael D scrawled: ) I think in my head I know you're right - but my
heart sees me on ) something altogther more fast & exciting.

When I finally caved in and bought a hybrid, I wondered where the hell my rugged, compact mountain
bike had got to. But I'm so glad I did. I carried the whole contents of my office home on my back
pannier tonight - several heavy books - and only noticed when I stopped that the bike had a slightly
different balance. For much of it I didn't feel the weight at all.

And they pick up a fair tilt of speed if they're not loaded up. I don't find myself overtaking any
less often.

J-P
--
Present then the world to the world with its mendicant shadow; Let the suits be flash, the Minister
of Commerce insane; Let jazz be bestowed on the huts, and the beauty's Set cosmopolitan smile.
 
S

Steve

Guest
I'm just concerned as to whether they're tough
> enough for a daily commute in all weathers & with up to about a stone in my panniers. Has anyone
> got any experience with these for a (heavily loaded) daily commute?
>
> (I forgot to put in my original post that I'm probably looking to spend around £400 - £600).

This is exactly what I bought my Sirrus for - daily commutes in all weathers covering 3000 miles a
year loaded up with panniers. I even go to asda with it and *really* load up - panniers and on top
of the pannier rack also.

I know what you mean about having an ultra cool steed, but I can assure you that by the time you get
lights, guards, pannier rack, bottle cages, etc. fitted to it to make it an all weather machine - it
doesn't look so cool! Mine should have been over £700 but as i mentioned before I got it reduced
down to £410 - result!

Steve
 
J

James Hodson

Guest
On Thu, 13 Mar 2003 14:29:05 +0000, Peter Clinch
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Only gotcha is if you have problems with drop bars.
>

Hi Pete

On the subject of drop bars, it has been about nine months since I bought my el-cheapo Orbea Larrau
<http://homepage.ntlworld.com/c.butty/Larrau.jpg> and it's only quite recently that I have got the
saddle / bar combination exactly to my liking.

Don't get me wrong, I have always been comfortable on the bike, but as I suffer from painful thumb
joints whether I'm cycling, skiing or just <I'll stop right here> I have spent all those months
fiddling around with those almost infinate combinations of height, rake, tilt etc and have now found
one that suits. (Note to self: do not buy new shoes!)

My rather off-topic point: I now love my drops even though I used to get a little
exasperated at times.

To be fair, I have not ridden a great deal of miles recently.

James

--
A credit limit is NOT a target.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

K
Replies
27
Views
601
G