Which Peugeot Is That?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Volnix, Jun 6, 2015.

  1. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Hi! :)

    I "found" a Peugeot road bike which except that it was left on the sun and rain for about 7 years seems to be unused. (Even the brake pads are original and unused). So I started stripping it to make a grocery shop thing.

    It says on it "Peugeot brazed butted tubing) everything says made in France and the handle bar says Something - Felipe Franco - Italian.

    The drop outs have fender fittings and it is a simplex front and rear 2*6.

    The brakes sat CBL and have written "Napoleon loves Amelie o them." :D

    It doesn't say carbolite or anything...

    Is it road bike or some kind of tourer? Any ideas?

    Will try to post pictures if I find out how to do it from the mobile...


    Fanks. :)
     
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  2. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Can't seem to upload pics for the moment. :(

    Oh, I forgot! The top tube has internal! Cable routing. :D
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Damned kids and their iPotato's! Never able to upload pics when technology fails them. Why...when I was your age I wuz riding a damned PoooJoe! And I wuz lucky to have it!

    Kids nowadays always want to be riding on the new fangled carbon fiber shorts and stuff!


    Internal cable routing? That's got to be a late model Peugeot. Peugeot didn't event discover decals that didn't disintegrate in two weeks until 1989!

    Felipe Franco? I dated his sister! Francisca Franco...man was she hot to trot!

    Are you sure those are not "Philippe" handlebars? Pivo stem?

    CLB lasted until around 1985 and was bought out by Sachs. They were decent brakes...as French brakes go. CLB and Mafac were the 'Big 2' in French brakes. Both were seen on Peugeots exported to the States.

    Pictures, man! Pictures. Use the Force...or at least the Rival!
     
  4. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    I got the pics but the new CF sanctions won't let me upload anything more then 700 bytes... ! :D

    I fell asleep with my laptop so Android is all the circuitry I have at the moment... Will try with tiny pic...
     
  5. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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  6. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    http://cyclespeugeot.com/index.html

    That's a decent website for Peugeot info and model dating.

    And: http://www.re-cycle.com/History/Peugeot/Peu_Models.aspx

    It looks like you have a model or date code Y07. Websites give conflicting information on what the Y07 represents. The helmeted rider on the Philippe bars suggests mid to later 1980's. Nitto still makes duplicate bends of the Philippe bars. Who knew?

    It also has some of the last model Simplex derailleurs.

    That bike is very much worth polishing up and re-fitting with the correct components. I would not sink a fortune in it, but I would keep looking for pieces parts and buying them up as time and funds permitted. That's a nice find, Volnix, and too bad it wasn't taken better care of.
     
  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. While I understand that many people prefer to see vintage bikes restored with the "correct" components, I would probably choose to re-build the bike with as many alternate components -- some vintage (but, subjectively "better" ... such as almost any Campagnolo or Shimano or a set of SunTour Superbe brake calipers ) and some new (i.e., unless you are planning on using the bike in an event which requires downtube shifters & other vintage components, then why not update the put a set of Campagnolo shifters?).
     
  9. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    As neglected as it is, it's practically unused... The brake pads are original and new!

    It's probably a classic case of a cycling enthusiasm wearing of. :D

    I wasn't thinking of "restoring" it as much as making some commuter out of it... (unless you know something that I don't :D )

    My neighbour already got his hands on the front wheel and tossed it in the recycling bin so I miss one wheel, but I asked a buddy who does restoration projects and told me that he could maybe sort me out with a matching one and I will give him the Rog...

    Plan is:

    Dip and remove rust from all the small parts.

    Might keep the front mech as its actually bolted on the tube instead of clamped.

    Might try to find a Shimano xt for the rear.

    Will try to derust the 6 speed cassette. (also unused).

    The crankset gives me hard time to remove as its seized stuck from rust... But there isn't even any chain marks on the chain rings... :D

    Will probably strip paint and decals, paint it a nice "commuter orange" with metallic flakes with liquid paint. Of course with "Volnix" decals. :p

    I'm a bit worried about the rust in the seatube. But that's probably fixable with a long drill sanding tip... But no idea on what's inside the rest.

    Also could not remove the stem so far although I removed the long Allen screw from it.

    I tried sliding the handlebar out of the stem again with no luck and I don't want to strip the friction ribs on it... It looks like a nice handlebar and with some blue bartape it might look good with the Orange frame. :p

    Fork is bare metal... Might just apply a clearcoat?

    There is not a single scratch on the whole thing!!! Just spider webs and rust. :p :D

    What do you think? :)

    Fanks :)
     
  10. BobCochran

    BobCochran Well-Known Member

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    So it is French threaded, right? I understand that English, Swiss, French, and Italian threads are all different?

    Bob
     
  11. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Oh its French alright...

    Bottom bracket and crankset is impossible to remove from rust too.

    Managed to remove the nut from one crank arm but the arm is stuck on the bottom bracket and kinda needs "Le hammer"...

    The other nut has so little clearance that probably needs a wrench bit from Super-Steel-ium" to fit in there which I do not have... It looks I might need to pull out the hack-saw... :D Dont think I will be re-packing that Bottom Bracket after all... :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. kylerlittle

    kylerlittle Member

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    Wow interesting pictures.
     
  13. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Those CLB brakes are classics. They have a helical QR that was ahead of its time. Polish them and try to keep the stamped lettering sharp...avoid over-polishing that area.

    Wow...it even has a French crank and pedals! This is worth fixing up.

    Invest in a bottle or can of Kroil penetrating oil. It's one of the best at penetrating corroded fasteners. Lacking Kroil, a mixture of Kerosene and automatic transmission fluid works well also. Soaking rusted and electrolytically corroded aluminum to steel surfaces for days or weeks is normal to get them apart without damage. Remember, it took YEARS to get that stuff stuck.

    You may find rust-pitted bearing balls and races/cups/cones. Replace the balls...they're cheap. Polish the cups/cones and see how they run-in. They 'may' lap themselves in and just be a little noisy or rough running, but otherwise last 10-20 more years under light use.

    As Alf advised, try to find the original parts. This bike deserves it. Greece is like a suburb of France so tracking down those old parts will be easier than if the bike were here in the States. Besides, all you Greeks can speak fluent Euroese and already know French threading was retarded even in 1972. This bike is a perfect excuse to go on a month-long driving trip through France to hit up small, old bike shops for parts and hit on hot French girls that wear perfect make-up and high fashion sun dresses with high stripper heels.

    Oh...and Cycle Art will make you repro decals for the new paint job and even add in a few tastefully located VOLNIX logos...and possibly a Greek flag for the top tube?
     
  14. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    The Yellow Jersey... http://www.yellowjersey.org/clb.html ...would be a source for French pieces parts in my area of the world. I'm sure you have much easier access to that stuff on the continent. Still, there's a link for you.
     
  15. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    The brakes have a small cbl metal plate glued on them... one fell off but its somewhere in the soda bath with the rest of the stuff...

    Yes le pedals are French... The crank is no brand so I have no clue what it is but I bet its also original.

    Even the tires were unused! But they were melted stuck on the rim and velox rim tape... :D

    I will go to the hardware store and pick up a soft wire brush... Won't buy any chemicals though... I will just clean everything with some cheap weldtite cycle oil and I will get it to a shop to see what can be done about the BB situation...

    I have all the parts! I just tossed all the plastics and cables. It's just a wheel that I miss... the remaining one has a helico matic hub... No idea what it is, just hope it isn't mavic though coz I'm gonna get stressed even more to restore it and be further angry for losing the other one...

    I won't be going to France anytime soon. :D and French girls are not exactly as you describe... :D think more like GLBT divorce material and hairy. Still better then the Greek ones though. :D Belgium is much nicer and I can get the train to Holland and smoke some pot with the American tourists. :D

    Hmmm decals cost a lot of moneyz... Will see, its a sweet bike but very very unlucky. :D

    I checked some websites and I think its a P8 or something. Serial # says Y507...

    Was so busy I forgot Le Soundtrack. :D

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRihV7vcZE4
     
  16. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    The types of Bottom Bracket threads which you mentioned ARE indeed different ...

    Peugeot switched to English threaded BBs in the mid-80s ...
     
  17. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Sweet... Le me won't have to become like Le Indiana Jones to find one then. :D
     
  18. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "...the remaining one has a helico matic hub... No idea what it is..."

    Maillard. Very rare. Instead of standard threads used by every other freewhell manufacture and hub manufacturer on the planet...Maillard used some bastardized helix (thus:HELIcomatic) to spin the freewheel onto the hub. The supposed benefit was no tools were needed to remove the freewheel IIRC.

    The drawback was...good luck finding hubs or freewheels as that standard was never...standard.

    Google for hub pics and you'll see the viva le difference.
     
  19. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  20. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Damn...wrong again. I guess you do need a tool because the freewheel is held on to the hub with a lock ring similar to today's cassettes.

    [​IMG]
     
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