Which pump for sus. fork?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Mule, Aug 23, 2003.

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  1. Mule

    Mule Guest

    I was wondering whether anyone out there has experience pumping 2003 Marzocchi MX Comp (AIR) forks?

    Should I buy the "Marzocchi pump" (lo-pressure)? I've read a few threads in forums saying that I can
    use any Schraeder pump but I'm not convinced yet. I already have a Schraeder valved pump but the
    business-end is too fat to fit inside the top of the fork where the valves are located - so I'd need
    to get a new pump.

    Obviously the Marzocchi pumps are quite expensive £30 and it'd be a lot nicer if I could make do
    with a conventional pump with a Schraeder nozzle.

    Any advice appreciated. Thanks,

    --
    ...meandering mule...
     
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  2. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    mule wrote:

    > I was wondering whether anyone out there has experience pumping 2003 Marzocchi MX Comp
    > (AIR) forks?

    Not specifically that fork, but...

    > Should I buy the "Marzocchi pump" (lo-pressure)? I've read a few threads in forums saying that I
    > can use any Schraeder pump but I'm not convinced yet.

    I always look for a shock pump with 2 facilities:
    1. A pressure guage.
    2. A valve mechanism which allows you to close the valve before you disconnect the pump,
    otherwise you don't have a clue how much pressure you left in the shock when you ripped the
    pump off the valve.

    You just plain won't get number 2 from a conventional (i.e. tyre) pump.

    > I already have a Schraeder valved pump but the business-end is too fat to fit inside the top of
    > the fork where the valves are located - so I'd need to get a new pump.

    B*gg*r.

    > Obviously the Marzocchi pumps are quite expensive £30 and it'd be a lot nicer if I could make do
    > with a conventional pump with a Schraeder nozzle.

    If by conventional, you mean tyre pump, see my comments above, unless you don't really care about
    being able to pump your shock back up to the pressure you decided on as being the best in a
    repeatable sort of way.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  3. Mule

    Mule Guest

    > I always look for a shock pump with 2 facilities:
    > 1. A pressure guage.
    > 2. A valve mechanism which allows you to close the valve before you disconnect the pump, otherwise
    > you don't have a clue how much pressure you left in the shock when you ripped the pump off the
    > valve.

    1. - Very useful.
    2. - That makes a lot of sense.

    > You just plain won't get number 2 from a conventional (i.e. tyre) pump.

    It sounds like I do need a fork pump then.

    I'll see if Halfords might have any pumps with gauges and nozzles with a valve closure mechanism -
    but might end up with the Marzocchi then after all.

    Thanks,

    --
    ...meandering mule...
     
  4. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > It sounds like I do need a fork pump then.
    >
    > I'll see if Halfords might have any pumps with gauges and nozzles with a valve closure mechanism -
    > but might end up with the Marzocchi then after all.

    If you have a rear shock on your bike that exceeds 100 psi you may want to reconsider on the
    Marzocchi pump, since the gauge won't be useful for most rear shocks. Many other front forks
    exceed 100 psi, so if you get a new bike your low pressure pump might become less useful to you.
    Just a thought.

    -John Morgan
     
  5. Mule

    Mule Guest

    > If you have a rear shock on your bike that exceeds 100 psi you may want to reconsider on the
    > Marzocchi pump, since the gauge won't be useful for most rear shocks. Many other front forks
    > exceed 100 psi, so if you get a new bike your low pressure pump might become less useful to you.
    > Just a thought.

    Hi John,

    Thanks for that too. I don't intend to get a bike with rear-shock at anytime soon, but I didn't know
    that front forks could exceed 100psi, so I'll bear that in mind when I'm shopping.

    Thanks for the info.

    --
    ...meandering mule...
     
  6. Danny Alcott

    Danny Alcott Guest

    I just bought a Buzzy pollinator yesterday from my LBS it's what they use in the shop. http://www.b-
    eyondbikes.com/bb/Itemmatrix.asp?CartId={8C245D65-7BE4-4CDF-8AD3-5A63A338F814}&IC=AC%2DPUM%2Dpu9000-
    &Tp= I got the one with the 100psi gauge but the pump will do 300psi so if I need to I can change
    the gauge in the future if I change forks. It works fine on my MX comp pro

    Danny

    "mule" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was wondering whether anyone out there has experience pumping 2003 Marzocchi MX Comp
    > (AIR) forks?
    >
    > Should I buy the "Marzocchi pump" (lo-pressure)? I've read a few threads
    in
    > forums saying that I can use any Schraeder pump but I'm not convinced yet. I already have a
    > Schraeder valved pump but the business-end is too fat to fit inside the top of the fork where the
    > valves are located - so I'd need to get a new pump.
    >
    > Obviously the Marzocchi pumps are quite expensive £30 and it'd be a lot nicer if I could make do
    > with a conventional pump with a Schraeder nozzle.
    >
    > Any advice appreciated. Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > ...meandering mule...
     
  7. ireman_1

    ireman_1 New Member

    Joined:
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    Good advice so far. You do want a pressure guage and release valve. Progressive suspension pumps work well and are designed for very high pressures. Don't be shy to spend a little money on the pump. If you want the proper performance out of your fork you really want to have the proper pressure. Keep the rubber side down.

    K.
     
  8. Mule

    Mule Guest

    Hi All,

    Thanks for the information and advice. It's been a long day. I got a foot pump from Halfords (which
    I thought would work with the fork - but didn't). Again the nozzle was a bit too big to fit, plus
    the "adaptors" that came with it were of no use.

    After hunting around a few LBSs (and not so LBSs) I ended up getting a Marzocchi pump. Other shock
    pumps seemed to cost as much as (if not more than) the Marzocchi, plus it seemed fairly well
    constructed.

    Now I've inflated the forks but I seem to have a problem...

    I've followed Marzocchi's recommendations regarding pressure and rider mass:

    155 ~ 180 lbs: 35 ~ 45 psi 180 ~ 200 lbs: 42 ~ 52 psi

    I weigh approximately 185 lbs so I first tried 45 psi (in each stanchion), but the fork was too
    rigid. Then I tried 35 psi but it's still too rigid.

    Am I doing something wrong? The marzocchi manual took a while to figure out. It seems to cover all
    models and it's a bit confusing.

    I'm assuming it can't be 35 ~ 45 psi "combined" pressure?

    I think I've read somewhere that they need "breaking in" but what do I need to do and how long for?
    I've actually got a ride planned for tomorrow so hope I make it!

    Again any help greatly appreciated.

    --
    ...meandering mule...
     
  9. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > It sounds like I do need a fork pump then.
    > >
    > > I'll see if Halfords might have any pumps with gauges and nozzles with a valve closure mechanism
    > > - but might end up with the Marzocchi then after all.
    >
    > If you have a rear shock on your bike that exceeds 100 psi you may want to reconsider on the
    > Marzocchi pump, since the gauge won't be useful for most rear shocks. Many other front forks
    > exceed 100 psi, so if you get a new bike your low pressure pump might become less useful to you.
    > Just a thought.

    I don't know which Marzocchi pump you are talking about, but the one I have has a gauge that goes up
    to 200 psi.

    JD
     
  10. Super Slinky

    Super Slinky Guest

    mule said...

    > I weigh approximately 185 lbs so I first tried 45 psi (in each stanchion), but the fork was too
    > rigid. Then I tried 35 psi but it's still too rigid.

    It's hard to know what you mean by too rigid. I hope those recommendations came from the manual for
    your particular fork, but regardless of where you got them, they are almost useless. The correct way
    to adjust the air pressure is to determine how much your forks sag when you sit on the bike in
    riding position. It is hard to do by yourself so sit on your bike just like you were riding it, but
    prop yourself up with a knee or elbow against a wall while a friend makes a small mark with a pencil
    on the stanchion right where it goes into the seal. Get off the bike and if the mark survived,
    measure the distance between the seal and the mark. It should be 1/4 - 1/3 the travel of your fork.
    Add or let out air as needed.

    > I'm assuming it can't be 35 ~ 45 psi "combined" pressure?

    You assume correctly.

    > I think I've read somewhere that they need "breaking in" but what do I need to do and how long
    > for? I've actually got a ride planned for tomorrow so hope I make it!

    Yes there is a break-in period. A new air shock may have a considerable amount of 'stiction'.
     
  11. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "mule" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Thanks for the information and advice. It's been a long day. I got a foot pump from Halfords
    > (which I thought would work with the fork - but didn't). Again the nozzle was a bit too big to
    > fit, plus the "adaptors" that came with it were of no use.
    >
    > After hunting around a few LBSs (and not so LBSs) I ended up getting a Marzocchi pump. Other shock
    > pumps seemed to cost as much as (if not more than) the Marzocchi, plus it seemed fairly well
    > constructed.
    >
    > Now I've inflated the forks but I seem to have a problem...
    >
    > I've followed Marzocchi's recommendations regarding pressure and rider mass:
    >
    > 155 ~ 180 lbs: 35 ~ 45 psi 180 ~ 200 lbs: 42 ~ 52 psi
    >
    > I weigh approximately 185 lbs so I first tried 45 psi (in each stanchion), but the fork was too
    > rigid. Then I tried 35 psi but it's still too rigid.
    >
    > Am I doing something wrong? The marzocchi manual took a while to figure out. It seems to cover all
    > models and it's a bit confusing.
    >
    > I'm assuming it can't be 35 ~ 45 psi "combined" pressure?
    >
    > I think I've read somewhere that they need "breaking in" but what do I need to do and how long
    > for? I've actually got a ride planned for tomorrow so hope I make it!
    >
    > Again any help greatly appreciated.

    Does the fork have a "negative" spring? If so, it needs to be inflated to sort of dampen the shock
    (will be much easier to compress than with no air in neg. chamber). Otherwise just keep reducing the
    air pressure until the sag (and FEEL) are right.

    Bill "don't need no steenkin' gauges" S.
     
  12. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    ireman_1 <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Good advice so far. You do want a pressure guage and release valve. Progressive suspension pumps
    > work well and are designed for very high pressures. Don't be shy to spend a little money on the
    > pump. If you want the proper performance out of your fork you really want to have the proper
    > pressure. Keep the rubber side down.
    >
    > K.

    But the Marzocchi is a low pressure fork - a small change in pressure will make a large change in
    how the fork behaves, compared to a fork that runs higher pressures. A pump that has a gauge
    graduated in small pressure increments is desirable for this fork AFAIAA.

    Shaun aRe
     
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