Which rider do you admire the most?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Roy Gardiner, Nov 13, 2003.

  1. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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  2. Frihed89

    Frihed89 New Member

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    A cyclist i admired a lot was Laurent Jalabert. He was at one time or another in his career a specialist in every department. He won the points title in the TDF, twice, the Spanish tour, three times, and the Italian Tour. He was the king of the mountains in the Spanish tour and the TDF, twice. He won the Spanish tour. He was the French champion and the world champion, plus the world time trial champion.

    No, he never won the tour. But it would be hard to find a better all round rider, esp. these days.

    But the greatest thing about him was his temperament: humorous and humble. Did anyone ever say anything bad about him?
     
  3. tafi

    tafi Member

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    I like strongmen, I aspire to ride like them grinding away with teeth gritted. The big men like Andrea Tafi, Johann Museew, Steffen Wesseman, Dario Pieri and also Jan Ullrich prove that historically the best riders are the big strong bastards who push impossible gears across the plains of northern France and the ardennes of Belgium. None of this spinning rubish, brute force in the big classics!
     
  4. Roy Gardiner

    Roy Gardiner New Member

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    You've chosen a pretty confrontational way of putting it - as if it's a simple concept I've been getting wrong for years against the wisdom of my betters - but the choice is yours.

    My description was taken from an interview given by him. He descibed the toe-down style as purely the result of pulling as well as pushing. I read it when I was a lad and he was winning, and of course tried to copy it. The pain in the calves was described by the interviewer, and it's exactly what happened to me. Anquetil was reported as saying that he didn't mind giving away his 'secret' because no-one seemed to be able to copy him.
    I never heard of POWERCRANKS but if you mean Powerpedals, yes that's exactly what they do. Because they only turn one way, one does not have to lift one's heel so much on the upstroke.

    Research with ordinary cyclists (and some very good ones) has indeed shown pulling up not to be useful. None of them was Anquetil, and his style has never been successfully copied.

    As I say, all I can report is what I read and tried for myself; as to the rest of what you said I've no real comment, the only bit I'm a bit baffled about is the elimination of the dead spot from 11 to 1, which I presume is the top of the stroke, not the bottom; how does the heels raised stance help that?
     
  5. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I enjoyed reading the opinions of each of the posters favourites here - all the choices are excellent and indeed each suggestion has been very well put for their respective favourites.

    My choice as to who I admire the most is a real blast from the past : Philippe Thys of Belgium.
    PT was the first man to win three Tours De France (1913,1914
    and 1920).
    Had it not been for the intervention of the First World War, I have no doubt that he would have won more T'sDF.
    Thy's served (and survived) the whole of the FWW (1914-1918),
    in the tenches of Belgium.
    Then after hostilities finished, he came back and won the TDF in 1920 !
    He also managed to win the Paris Tour and Giro di Lombardy as well.
    For me his career is a revelation : his ability to withstand terrible cycling conditions and to win in an era when there was a lot
    of shortcuts taken by competitors, is truly exceptional.
    If Thys was in the modern era, I think he would be a superstar.
     
  6. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Good to see Beryl Burton being mentioned earilier in the thread.

    Australians like Australian cyclists, but I'm Tasmanian and that's why my heroes are Ken Self and Danny Clark. ;)
     
  7. Roy Gardiner

    Roy Gardiner New Member

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    And I've just read the review in CW... interesting. £plenty, though.
     
  8. Tuschinski

    Tuschinski New Member

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    He was one of my favorites:) But he didn't win the Points title in the Giro, nor was he road world champion (he indeed was TT world champion)
     
  9. funknuggets

    funknuggets New Member

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    Hands down STUD.

    Quality competitor, with talent to spare. Flipped around from being sprinter, to climber and made some freaking epic solos. Had some fantastic classic wins. You never knew what that guy had up his sleeve...
     
  10. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    Sorry Roy for my choice of words. That interview you read
    would probably have been an english translation of his french so
    the translator probably messed it up. The pulling up is done by the arms not the legs and the discreet arm resistance can add a
    lot to the power when it is most required as in the closing stages
    of that famous TT against Poulidor (on video), you can see more
    clearly how he is using his arms. And on that video, when his
    manager is describing how he powered his bike in the closing
    stages of that famous double, he demonstrates how the upper
    body power was brought into play but of course he did not know
    how the power was applied to the pedals. When you eliminate
    upper dead spot area, you are also automatically eliminating the lower area. The toes down technique used by Anquetil was the
    result of his method of power application, the direction that his
    shoes were pointing was the direction line through which he was
    mentally applying the power to the pedals from the hips, he never
    used direct downward pedal pressure. His power application
    started at 11 o'clock, not the 1 o'clock where all other riders'
    serious power application began and Anquetil's power ended at
    5 o'clock. As I already stated, being 99 percent mental his style
    could never be copied, it would have to be independently
    discovered and to make matters even more complicated, while
    his style appears to be a round pedalling style, it is a linear style
    with the power application line feeling parallel to the arm
    resistance line and it was this relationship that made the
    combination of arm and leg power possible.
     
  11. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    This might help to give you a better picture of how he applied
    the pedal power in that 11 to 1 o'clock area. He applied it
    as if attempting to forcibly slide his shoe over the pedal while
    at the same time concentrating on trying to drive the cleat into
    the back of pedal and this action can be continued until the
    pedal reached 5 o'clock. It was this simple action that enabled
    him to do naturally what researchers have tried in vain to do
    by mechanical means. But it takes time to get the calves fully
    accustomed to their new and much more active work role. For
    anyone trying it, it can lead to cramping in the early stages but
    that problem is soon eliminated.
     
  12. Roy Gardiner

    Roy Gardiner New Member

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    No offence taken.

    You say that the translation is wrong. I'll have to find it again, I'm sure that it would have been Rene de Latour - no slouch!

    I presume you refer to the Maitre Jacques video with Geminiani rabbiting on. I'll have to watch it yet again.

    But do you have sources I don't? All my recollection is from published stuff, like Sporting Cyclist and the like, and I don't recall reading the view you're putting forward.
     
  13. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    As you stated, he did not mind revealing his secret to anyone
    because even after being told,they could not copy his style. The
    explanation for that is that when you first begin to use his style,
    all your muscles are being used in a completely different way and
    it takes months for them to get accustomed to all the changes.
    Riders would not have the patience, if they did not see an
    instant improvement, they would be back to their old style.
    For that very reason I had intended to invite a group of some of
    the worst cycling related back pain victims to Dublin last year but
    had to leave it until this year. Within a day or two after getting
    all details, they should be pedalling completely pain free but it
    will take a season to fully perfect the technique. This group will
    have no other option, for them it's a case of, time trial as
    Anquetil did or you can't time trial at all.
    For that same reason above there are no sources for his style,
    nobody else knows how he did it, if they did, it would be used
    in all time trial and pursuit events today because the power that
    his smooth style generates cannot be beaten by any other
    pedalling style.
    It is said that a talented sportsman makes a bad coach because
    when it comes natural to him, he has great difficulty in passing
    details of his style to other sportsmen.
    The only mystery that remains for me about his style is how he
    happened to start from day one with that technique.
     
  14. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    Is it possible to print a copy of that interview.
     
  15. Roy Gardiner

    Roy Gardiner New Member

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    That's the question I was asking; how do you know?
    Another quote of yours
    which is again the first I've heard of this.
    If and when I find it I'll put the relevant bits here. On searching the Internet, the only people saying anything are thee and me, so I guess I should try hard. Once again, I'm intrigued as to your source of knowledge, please tell us.
     
  16. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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  17. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    By far my favorite cyclist is Lance Armstrong not so much for his accomplishments but for the mere fact that he is almost unhuman. Having survived cancer the way he had done it is heroic to people suffering from that horrible disease. The ability to win the tdf in '99 just returning from all the nightmares is incredible.

    He has a new book out called "Every Second Counts" read it very emotional book.
     
  18. Sprinter_989

    Sprinter_989 New Member

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    Stuart O'Grady
    Tyler Hamilton
    Jacky Durand......... yeh thats right the suicidal attack man, he never gives up trying to win in a long break.
     
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