Which triple for road bike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by EDS, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. EDS

    EDS Guest

    I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    occasional group rides and centuries.

    My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    an Ultegra double.

    The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    and Chorus has fewer of them.

    What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    how these operate v. the Shimano ones?

    Thanks,

    ed
     
    Tags:


  2. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    EDS wrote:

    > The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    > and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    > overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    > triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    > and Chorus has fewer of them.


    Another theory would be that fewer bikes come installed with Chorus,
    so there are fewer people out there to complain.

    The Ultegra triple is only slightly heavier than Dura-Ace, but it's
    much less expensive. The largest downside to the Shimano cranks I
    see is the silly Octalink bottom bracket, destined to do the
    "Shimano creak" in short order as the crank slips ever so slightly
    on the splines. It's very annoying to climb next to a Shimano rider.

    I decided to take the path less traveled and purchase an FSA triple
    with ISIS bottom bracket. There are some pretty decent prices for
    these compnents on ebay. The parts are on their way...we'll see how
    well they work in due time.

    Another option is the FSA compact crank double, with 50/34
    chainwheels. You lose a little off the high end and a little off the
    low end of a triple, but the low range is pretty darn low. And you
    get to keep your current shifters.

    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?


    The Campy brake levers aren't used to do the shifting, only the
    braking. There's a finger lever to shift one way and a thumb lever
    to shift the other way. Campy brifters can be overhauled, Shimanos
    can't. When the Shimanos stop working, you replace them.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  3. hobby

    hobby Guest

    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > ed
    >


    I am 74 and ride a LandShark (custom steel frame) with Campy Chorus triple
    components and love it. Got it from GVH Bikes. I find the shifting to be
    a lot easier with Campy than Shimano, plus you can repair Campy shifters
    with parts if necessary. But repairs are rare. The LandShark steel frame
    helps make my ride smoother and less jarring on the spine and wrist's.

    If I were to buy a new bike now, I'd go with Gary's newest steel frame (made
    by a famous builder). His email is [email protected] . Gary Hobbs
    carries hundreds of frames and custom builds at a bargain price. Almost
    any name brand is in stock. His web site is http://www.gvhbikes.com/


    Tom Hobby
     
  4. Bert L.

    Bert L. Guest

    "EDS" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    > Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    > occasional group rides and centuries.
    >
    > My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    > an Ultegra double.
    >
    > The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    > and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    > overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    > triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    > and Chorus has fewer of them.
    >
    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > ed
    >


    I'm very happy with the Campa Veloce triple on the road bike and with the
    Shimanoa XT on the dirt bike. Both Campa's Veloce and the Shimanoa 105
    equivalent are very good and seem to fit in with the type of user you are.
    You did consider to keep the existing bike and to change toothing on the
    existing double?

    Bert l.
     
  5. Jkpoulos7

    Jkpoulos7 Guest

    >I
    >haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    >how these operate v. the Shimano ones?


    You haven't missed much. The hoods are much smaller so if your hands are man
    sized they are uncomfortable. To shift to a higher ger you must use your thumb
    like on the cheap sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it difficult
    to shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their brifters.
     
  6. LGF

    LGF Guest

    EDS <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    > Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    > occasional group rides and centuries.
    >
    > My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    > an Ultegra double.
    >
    > The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    > and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    > overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    > triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    > and Chorus has fewer of them.
    >
    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?
    >


    Stronglight and TA do excellent triple chainsets! Check out:

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/

    LGF
     
  7. On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 09:34:15 +0000, Jkpoulos7 wrote:

    >>I
    >>haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    >>how these operate v. the Shimano ones?

    >
    > You haven't missed much. The hoods are much smaller so if your hands are man
    > sized they are uncomfortable. To shift to a higher ger you must use your thumb
    > like on the cheap sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it difficult
    > to shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their brifters.


    This is clearly a troll, but since you asked for information I don't want
    this to masquerade as such.

    The hoods are not smaller with Campy brifters. I have large hands, and
    find them more comfortable than Shimano. The thumb shifter on Campy
    levers is placed within easy reach whether you are on the tops, or the
    drops. Seeing as how Campy shifters were around years before Sora, who
    tried to copy whom should be clear, though Shimano's version is much, much
    harder to shift.

    There are serious differences between the two systems. The left shifter
    on Campy Ergo is not really indexed, it has many clicks -- a ratcheting
    friction shifter like the old Sun Tour, sort of. This allows easy
    trimming of the front derailleur, and makes the design of the derailleur
    simpler. You can also use any cranks you please with Campy, no worries
    about compatibility. IMO Shimano front shifters are much fussier, because
    of the need to have a one-click shift. They have recently added trim
    capabilities to some models, but Campy had that from the beginning and IMO
    it works better.

    Another big difference is what happens 2-3 years down the road. All
    brifters will wear. Campy ones have a particular part that wears out at
    about this much use. Costs less than $5 to replace, and can be replaced
    by a reasonably-mechanically-inclined owner. Shimano ones also break down
    at around the same amount of use. They are not repairable, not even by a
    shop mechanic.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And what if you track down these men and kill them, what if you
    _`\(,_ | killed all of us? From every corner of Europe, hundreds,
    (_)/ (_) | thousands would rise up to take our places. Even Nazis can't
    kill that fast. -- Paul Henreid (Casablanca).
     
  8. EDS

    EDS Guest

    On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 09:09:04 -0400, "David L. Johnson"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There are serious differences between the two systems. The left shifter
    >on Campy Ergo is not really indexed, it has many clicks -- a ratcheting
    >friction shifter like the old Sun Tour, sort of. This allows easy
    >trimming of the front derailleur, and makes the design of the derailleur
    >simpler. You can also use any cranks you please with Campy, no worries
    >about compatibility. IMO Shimano front shifters are much fussier, because
    >of the need to have a one-click shift. They have recently added trim
    >capabilities to some models, but Campy had that from the beginning and IMO
    >it works better.


    Thanks. This is helpful. It is the sort of info I was looking for.
    >
    >Another big difference is what happens 2-3 years down the road. All
    >brifters will wear. Campy ones have a particular part that wears out at
    >about this much use. Costs less than $5 to replace, and can be replaced
    >by a reasonably-mechanically-inclined owner. Shimano ones also break down
    >at around the same amount of use. They are not repairable, not even by a
    >shop mechanic.


    I did end up replacing my right Ultegra brifter, so I know about this
    one. What I didn't realize was how inexpensively and simply the Campy
    could be repaired.
     
  9. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 09:34:15 +0000, Jkpoulos7 wrote:
    >
    > >>haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > >>how these operate v. the Shimano ones?

    > >
    > > You haven't missed much. The hoods are much smaller so if your hands are man
    > > sized they are uncomfortable. To shift to a higher ger you must use your

    thumb
    > > like on the cheap sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it

    difficult
    > > to shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their

    brifters.
    >
    > This is clearly a troll, but since you asked for information I don't want
    > this to masquerade as such.
    >
    > The hoods are not smaller with Campy brifters. I have large hands, and
    > find them more comfortable than Shimano.


    A data point: the 2004 Shimano consumer catalogue makes much of the fact that
    they have now reduced the size (circumference) of their lever hoods.
    --
    Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
  10. EDS <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    > Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    > occasional group rides and centuries.
    >
    > My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    > an Ultegra double.
    >
    > ......
    >

    You may consider one of many quality triples with 110mm BCD. The
    advantage being the the larger chainrings can go as small as 34 tooth.
    With Shimano (130mm bcd) the smallest is 38 and Campy (135mm bcd) the
    smallest is 39. A 24-36-48 combo can be done in 110 but not in the
    others.

    I suggesting it because I recently put together a quality old bike
    with a 110mm bcd 36-44 double. I like it enough that if I were going
    to purchase a triple I would go with it. (110mm BCD triples use the
    same 74mm BCD small chainring as Shimano and Campy).

    Tom
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 19:19:50 -0400, EDS
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    >Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    >occasional group rides and centuries.
    >
    >My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    >an Ultegra double.
    >
    >The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    >and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    >overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    >triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    >and Chorus has fewer of them.
    >
    >What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    >haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    >how these operate v. the Shimano ones?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    > ed
    >

    I have a road bike with Ultegra triple and my wife has one with Veloce
    triple. I'm quite happy with my Ultegra set-up and it works very
    well, but I think I prefer the Veloce.It seems to shift more
    positively and the front shifting is more forgiving. A couple of
    things you might think about:

    Though I don't think I'd say that either is inherently better, the
    hood shapes on each are quite different. You might find that you
    prefer one over the other.

    The shifting systems are different and if you have other bikes of
    either make, you might find it confusing to go from one to the other.

    Good luck.
     
  12. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 4 Jun 2004 09:31:41 -0700, [email protected] (Thomas
    Reynolds) wrote:
    >You may consider one of many quality triples with 110mm BCD. The
    >advantage being the the larger chainrings can go as small as 34 tooth.
    > With Shimano (130mm bcd) the smallest is 38 and Campy (135mm bcd) the
    >smallest is 39. A 24-36-48 combo can be done in 110 but not in the
    >others.


    Because it may not automatically occur to some who are reading this,
    cranks like that are very easily found by asking for mountain bike
    cranks.

    For example, Deore FC-M761 = 48-36-26T. BCD isn't 110, though.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  13. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    [email protected]topspam (Jkpoulos7) writes:

    ><missing attribution>
    >>I haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference
    >>in how these operate v. the Shimano ones?

    >
    > You haven't missed much. The hoods are much smaller so if your hands
    > are man sized they are uncomfortable.


    YMMV. I'm not only a man, I'm 6'4" (1.96 m) and have big hands.
    Campy's Ergo levers are far more comfortable than Shimano's for as-
    mainly because they make a smooth transition from the top of the bar
    onto the top of the hood, unlike Shimano's design. I never get numb
    fingers on the Campy levers and quickly get them on the Shimano STIs.

    > To shift to a higher ger you must use your thumb like on the cheap
    > sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it difficult to
    > shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their
    > brifters.


    Vice versa, actually. Shimano copied Campy- not for the first time!
     
  14. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    Lots snipped

    >> To shift to a higher ger you must use your thumb like on the cheap
    >> sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it difficult to
    >> shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their
    >> brifters.

    >
    >Vice versa, actually. Shimano copied Campy- not for the first time!
    >
    >

    Please, Tim, don't feed the trolls.
    Phil Brown
    >
    >
     
  15. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    EDS <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?


    I have been using Campagnolo Centaur for the last couple of months. I
    am particularly impressed with the quality of the front shifter. I
    had serious concerns about going to a triple and losing quality
    shifting on the crankset, but the shifting is very crisp and quick.

    I much prefer the feel of Campy's shifting to that of Shimano. The
    solid click is reassuring as opposed to the ephemeral feel of Shimano.
    I also think that the cable routing on Campy is much more appearing
    than the S brand.

    I would buy the Centaur group again. Check with Excel Sports'. They
    have really good prices on this group.

    Dick Durbin
    Tallahassee
     
  16. Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 4 Jun 2004 09:31:41 -0700, [email protected] (Thomas
    > Reynolds) wrote:
    > >You may consider one of many quality triples with 110mm BCD. The
    > >advantage being the the larger chainrings can go as small as 34 tooth.
    > > With Shimano (130mm bcd) the smallest is 38 and Campy (135mm bcd) the
    > >smallest is 39. A 24-36-48 combo can be done in 110 but not in the
    > >others.

    >
    > Because it may not automatically occur to some who are reading this,
    > cranks like that are very easily found by asking for mountain bike
    > cranks.
    >
    > For example, Deore FC-M761 = 48-36-26T. BCD isn't 110, though.


    Correct. Those are usually 94 mm bcd. One of my road bikes has an LX
    22-34-48 combo. But one of the reasons I have become enamored with my
    110 is because I also have a 52 tooth chainring that I can swap on at
    anytime. Chainrings that big are kind of hard to find for 94 mm.

    Tom
     
  17. Kyle.B.H

    Kyle.B.H Guest

    "EDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm looking at getting a new road bike in the not too distant future.
    > Usage will be mostly solo riding around the New England area, with
    > occasional group rides and centuries.
    >
    > My tired old body is demanding a triple. Right now, my road bike has
    > an Ultegra double.
    >
    > The price of Dura-Ace and Chorus are virtually the same. I've Googled
    > and read a bunch of discussions on the DA triple. It has not been
    > overwhelmingly positive. I've found fewer postings on the Chorus
    > triple. One theory would be that people tend to post about problems
    > and Chorus has fewer of them.
    >
    > What do folks who actually ride bikes with these components think? I
    > haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > how these operate v. the Shimano ones?



    If you'd like to pick your own chainrings, instead of having to use
    Shimano/Campy's often too large 52-42-30 (some Campy's come in 50-40-30),
    then I recommend a TA Alize crankset from Peter White Cycles. Its a nice
    looking crankset, about same weight as Ultegra, good 'ole square taper BB,
    and he'll put on any chainring sizes you choose. I did 50-40-28 and it
    works perfectly on an otherwise all Ultegra setup.

    www.peterwhitecycles.com

    Kyle
     
  18. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    [email protected]topspam (Jkpoulos7) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >I
    > >haven't ridden a bike with Campy brifters. What is the difference in
    > >how these operate v. the Shimano ones?

    >
    > You haven't missed much. The hoods are much smaller so if your hands are man
    > sized they are uncomfortable. To shift to a higher ger you must use your thumb
    > like on the cheap sora group. This limits hand positions and makes it difficult
    > to shift in the drops Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their brifters.


    Poulos, are you totally incapable of being embarrassed at your own
    ignorant statements? As I told you once before when you made the same
    uninformed comment about the Campy hoods being too small, I am a grown
    man (53 years old) and they fit my hands just fine.

    Do your homework before you post. Campy's brifters were around long
    before Sora. I have never had any trouble shifting from the drops on
    my Campys.

    Go back to the GI Joe news group since you seem to live in such a
    fantasy world.

    Dick Durbin
     
  19. B

    B Guest

    > Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their brifters.

    I was wondering who was the type to fall for this ploy.
    Now I know.
    B

    (remove clothes to reply)
     
  20. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    [email protected]lothes (B) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Camp. copied the lowest shimano group for their brifters.

    >
    > I was wondering who was the type to fall for this ploy.
    > Now I know.
    > B


    And what ploy was that?
     
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