Which triple for road bike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by EDS, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 09:34:15 +0000, Jkpoulos7 wrote:
    >
    > The left shifter
    > on Campy Ergo is not really indexed, it has many clicks -- a ratcheting
    > friction shifter like the old Sun Tour, sort of. This allows easy
    > trimming of the front derailleur, and makes the design of the derailleur
    > simpler. You can also use any cranks you please with Campy, no worries
    > about compatibility.


    > Another big difference is what happens 2-3 years down the road. All
    > brifters will wear. Campy ones have a particular part that wears out at
    > about this much use. Costs less than $5 to replace, and can be replaced
    > by a reasonably-mechanically-inclined owner. Shimano ones also break down
    > at around the same amount of use. They are not repairable, not even by a
    > shop mechanic.


    Just examples of the above... I have the Campy front brifter shifting
    a Shimano front derailleur over a Raceface compact triple (44-34-22),
    no problem. (I forgot how strange it sounds though!)

    And the right (rear) brifter did need rebuilding around 5K miles like
    Campy suggests. So I rebuilt it and it shifts like new again. I also
    rebuilt the front (Left) while I was at it, but it really didn't need
    it like the back did.

    The Campy front will shift about anything - and the trim does help, I
    have Shimano on our tandem and the lack of trim is a bit of a pain.
     


  2. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > All brifters will wear. Campy ones have a particular part that
    > wears out at about this much use. Costs less than $5 to replace,
    > and can be replaced by a reasonably-mechanically-inclined owner.


    $5 for a Campy part? I didn't think any parts made by Campy were
    that cheap. The rubber brake hoods alone cost $40:

    http://branfordbike.com/brake/brk4.html#item3

    I think you need to add a zero after that $5 figure, above.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  3. Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:
    > $5 for a Campy part? I didn't think any parts made by Campy were
    > that cheap. The rubber brake hoods alone cost $40:


    > I think you need to add a zero after that $5 figure, above.


    http://branfordbike.com/brake/big/bk05biga.html

    #2 is the thumb return spring ($5.88) and #4 is the G spring ($4.88). that's
    each & they are just little springs.
    --
    david reuteler
    [email protected]
     
  4. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 07:15:14 -0700, Terry Morse <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >$5 for a Campy part? I didn't think any parts made by Campy were
    >that cheap. The rubber brake hoods alone cost $40:
    >
    >http://branfordbike.com/brake/brk4.html#item3
    >
    >I think you need to add a zero after that $5 figure, above.
    >--


    The springs that need replacement are $4-5 each and you need 2. If
    you don't do it yourself, a shop charges ~$25. The price of the
    rubber hoods is criminal. Fortunately, the rubber lasts a long time.
    It keeps getting thinner before it tears. Sort of like nylon socks
    that don't get holes but are see through.
     
Loading...
Loading...