which would you pick? Moots Vamoots, or BMC SLT01?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by sma, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. sma

    sma New Member

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    i am trying to figure out which bike to get. i've set myself a budget of <$5000, and with both of these frames ~$2500, i'm pretty sure i can keep myself under my budget, depending on whether i go dura ace or ultegra (or a mix) and which wheels i choose.

    i typically ride 20-30 miles 3-4 days a week and then i usually do a longer ride (50-100 miles) on saturday or sunday. i don't plan on doing any criterium races, but may like to do some road races in the future.

    i currently ride a 2001 Klein Quantum with a Shimano 105 gruppo that i bought on ebay last year. I want to make the plunge this winter before my wife and i have a kid in a year or two, and this will be my last major bike purchase for a long time, so it's got to last.

    i've read good things about both bikes, i like the design and paint schemes, i guess it's just a matter of whether i want titanium or carbon fiber. i don't want to start another flame war, so hopefully this doesn't turn into a huge debate. hopefully based on my description of how i ride will help with suggestions.

    here are images of the frames:

    Moots
    [​IMG]


    BMC SLT01 Team Machine
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    Neither. Put your budgetted $$ in the bank until it comes time to race. At this point you don't need a new, much less high end, bike.

    Or better yet, pay off your credit card debt.
     
  3. sma

    sma New Member

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    thanks for the reply. i have no cc debt, so are you basically saying that i'm wasting my money? i really just want to get a bike that is comfortable, looks good, and will last me a long time without having to get a new one within a few years. i'd rather buy my "dream bike" and be done with it.
     
  4. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    Okay, that's a good starting point for a cost-benefit analysis. First we'll break down the requirements, then we'll look at the various costs of meeting those requirements.

    What is it about your Klein that doesn't satisfy those criteria?

    - comfort
    - appearance
    - longevity
    - performance (implied)
    - suitability to purpose (implied)

    Are there more requirements? Elaborate a bit on the importance of each. For instance, I get the impression that appearance is very important to you (and those are some sweet looking frames!).
     
  5. sma

    sma New Member

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    Well, on long rides (>50 miles), the vibrations that i can feel in my rear and my arms definitely gets annoying and somewhat painful. it's the older Klein Quantum that doesn't have carbon rear stays, but does have a carbon fork. There are a few nicks and scratches and a small dent in the seat tube. What I'd like to do is use the Moots or BMC as my daily bike, but keep the Klein as a rainy day/trainer bike.
     
  6. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    Have you ridden either of the candidate bikes? Have you been fitted to a frame? If you're looking at a $$$ bike as a long-term solution, fit is a critical element.

    As to frame materials, you can probably (not necessarily, since the material can be conformed to the designers' goals) get a comfortable ride with carbon. The issue with carbon is that longevity is an open question, and fragility is a known issue. Carbon is nearly impossible to repair.

    Titanium is purported to ride well (depending on design), is relatively brittle - more than a few reported frame breaks - and is very expensive to acquire and repair.

    Aluminum certainly has its proponents, but I've found every AL road (not touring) bike I've ridden - even those with carbon forks and hourglass seat stays - to be uncomfortably rigid.

    Steel, again depending on the design, can be both flexible and rigid. For instance, trapezoidal cross-section downtubes can have enormous torsional rigidity to combat bottom bracket flex yet provide some non-torsional frame flex for comfort.

    Note that I haven't mentioned weight. First, there's not much to choose with modern technology. But second and most important, weight just isn't that important at your level. As per Lance, "It isn't about the bike."

    Please note that I editted post #4 while you were replying. I'll see what you have to say to the new contents before I go on.
     
  7. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    BTW, just so we're not a cross purposes, let me tell you where I'm coming from on this. I don't dispute that you should replace (actually augment) your existing fleet. The first question is, will spending $5K on your "ultimate bike" satisfy your needs? (Which is why I asked you to prioritize your requirements.) For instance, comfort and race performance are generally considered to be opposing goals.

    The second question is, how do you get what you need without wasting $$? You're going to be short of $$ shortly, so you won't have a second chance.

    When I said put your $$ in the bank, I was being pretty literal. Set aside the money, spend some on professional fitting, then spend ~$1500 now on a replacement when you find a good deal. Look for a bike that will let you put in lots of miles. Then when you get ready for racing, you'll still have $2500+ for a more specialized ride.

    Or wait for a steal on your "ultimate bike". For instance, check ebay auction items 270036065017 and 140038226363.
     
  8. sma

    sma New Member

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    thanks again for your tips on all of this...

    i realize the arguement for choosing a bike for racing rather than recreation/touring. while i don't plan to do any criterium racing, i am leaving the door open for road races in the future. i'm not sure if i would want a different bike for a road race versus my weekly rides. they would just seem to differ in my pace it would seem, but then again, i've never actually raced before, so i'm talking out of my ass i guess.

    in no particular order, my criteria for choosing a frame honestly just comes down to comfort and looks. i've done a few century rides and not once have i seen a bmc frame and have only seen a few moots frames. seeing trek's, cannondale's, and colnago's all the time gets kind of boring. i like the uniqueness of the brands as well as their looks.

    what i was planning on doing is building the bike up with a mix of ultegra and dura ace components to keep costs down along with keeping the door open in the future to upgrade components as needed/wanted.

    in regards to the eBay links, thanks for searching. i actually have a bookmark in my browser with search terms BMC and Moots, so i have seen those. just too big for me. but i've definitely kepy my eyes open and if the right deal came along, i'd certainly pick it up. but both brands don't seem to return many results.
     
  9. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    The difference in racing bikes is geometry, followed by weight. And the type of racing can dictate the type of bike. What you want now would be unsuitable for TT, triathlon, cyclocross, crit, etc.

    I mostly ride a 2003 Raleigh Professional steel frame with carbon fork, Ultegra, and Shimano 16-spoke wheels. Very comfortable. Never seen another on the road and I get lots of compliments. It cost $900 with <200 mi on it, which makes it extra sweet. (Pic is of similar.)

    [​IMG]

    Between the choices above, I'd go for the BMC. How much do they want for it new?
     
  10. sma

    sma New Member

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  11. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    Y'know, I get the feeling that this bike is the expression of an early mid-life, or terminal adolescent, crisis. Like you're staring minivan Dad-hood in the face and grabbing for one last souvenir of your carefree days. :cool:

    I understand. :p Some people buy a sports car (and a year later the lurkers in the used sports car market thank them :D ).

    Thing is, on the other side of Dad-hood you won't feel the same. As much as you will enjoy the bike, after a while you'll either start to feel guilty or you'll feel that you have to keep up a consistent appearance with other high-end accoutrements like bike clothes and even support vehicle. Maybe you can easily afford it, and if so, be my guest (and send pics). But in my situation, which I believe is similar to yours, that kind of $$ for a frame makes no sense to me.

    Why not contanct Tom at (541)266-8831 or [email protected]. Here's the web site. Tell him what you're into and see what he has to say. (Then tell us.) ;)
     
  12. sma

    sma New Member

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    i have a feeling you're right. i'm 25 and since i drive a company car (a boring '04 jetta), this bike is my "sports car." thank you for all of your input, it's definitely got me thinking about whether this is really the right decision.

    decisions, decisions...
     
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