Who likes wax lube? Who doesn't ?



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I ride gravel. I've used Rock and Roll Gold for years.I was on 2 very dusty gravel grinders and the dust on my chain and cassette caused the chain to grind and climb to a bigger gear on the cassette. I just put on a new degreased chain so If I want to try a wax it's now?
Do you have a favorite wax ( tried more than one wax?) Or did you not like it??
 
I just put on a new degreased chain so If I want to try a wax it's now?

Depends on what kind wax you're planning on using. Commercial bottled ones (cycling-specific dry lube) or DIY/homemade melted paraffin wax formula?

If using dry lube, you can apply it now.

If using the homemade melted wax formula, then it should be BEFORE you put the chain on the bike. You must clean and degrease it again, dry, and then put it in the pot of melted wax before you install the chain on the bike.

OK I never used wax but I did lots of research because I like low maintenance and wax can make that possible. HOWEVER, all research have also told me waxing does not apply to me because I ride in relatively wet conditions (rain or wet roads). In fact, research tells me I should instead be getting belt drive bike or at least internal gear hub (IGH) with chain case/cover while using wet lube. This will give total protection from the elements, including dirt from gravel or dusty roads.
 
I turned to waxing just a month ago after getting a new bike. I would never go back to traditional lubes.
I use immersive waxing with silca super secret chain wax.
I ride only in dry conditions, so I have no need to rewax frequently.
 
Who doesn't?

I don't use it. Rather nice conditions here most times in So Cal so the lube I use is more than fine. Finish Line dry stuff.
 
I used to lubricate with dry lubes. My problem was that I needlessly had to wash a clean bike to remove degreaser.
With wax I just take the chain off the bike, put in melted wax, hang it to dry and put it back on the bike. It's a very clean lubrication technique.
 
I used to lubricate with dry lubes. My problem was that I needlessly had to wash a clean bike to remove degreaser.
With wax I just take the chain off the bike, put in melted wax, hang it to dry and put it back on the bike. It's a very clean lubrication technique.

I almost decided doing this but proponents of immersive waxing keep telling, don't do it if riding conditions is often wet.

If I had money, I'll have a bike built with IGH with either belt drive or chain with cover to fully weatherproof the bike. I don't care about the looks. I just want low maintenance.
 
Unfortunately if you often ride in wet condition you can't help but washing the bike every time you come back, so it is not so important what kind of lube you choose
 
Unfortunately if you often ride in wet condition you can't help but washing the bike every time you come back, so it is not so important what kind of lube you choose

Experts in immersive waxing told the method don't offer adequate protection from corrosion even if I re-apply wax after each wet ride.

And because water from the road is often contaminated with oil from vehicles and soot (from soot deposited on the road surface by vehicle exhaust), I can't just put the chain in the melted pot after a wet ride but must also clean and degrease the chain first which is an added hassle.

It seems the only practical solution is IGH with belt drive or chain (with cover). I really don't mind the looks, I already have full fenders on my bike.
 
Experts in immersive waxing told the method don't offer adequate protection from corrosion even if I re-apply wax after each wet ride.

And because water from the road is often contaminated with oil from vehicles and soot (from soot deposited on the road surface by vehicle exhaust), I can't just put the chain in the melted pot after a wet ride but must also clean and degrease the chain first which is an added hassle.

It seems the only practical solution is IGH with belt drive or chain (with cover). I really don't mind the looks, I already have full fenders on my bike.
You get corrosion/rust if you don' t take care immediately of the chain after a wet ride. With wax unfortunately you cannot come back with wet bike and leave it as it is until next ride or you would have rust on your cog and chain.
The procedure after a wet ride is: dry your drivetrain, take the chain off, put it in a bath of boiling water, swooshing it inside boiling water, dry thoroughly and rewax. You do not have to use degreaser on waxed chain.
It does not require more time than it would take with wet lubes. The real big problem, in my opinion, is cost. If you ride often in the wet you have to take the chain off every time, and that means opening/closing missing link. I use YBN missing links, which are officially 5 times reusable, but even with a reusable missing link if you ride 3 times a week or more in the wet, you could end up using 3 or more missing links every month, which is definitely expensive.
 
You do not have to use degreaser on waxed chain.

Experts on immersive waxing did say you need to degrease a waxed chain after a wet ride. Obviously, the grease isn't from the wax but the grease coming from the road.

Cars and vehicles deposit oil, soot, and literally grease on the road (like that coming from the rubber boot of universal joints in driveshafts of cars and trucks). Totally harmless in dry conditions. But when the road gets wet, the lower density oil and grease comes off the road and floats around on the wet road and then gets on your bike, chain, etc.

I think that road grease getting into your chain can possibly come off with boiling water but you have to do it a few times because the first time, the grease would float to the surface of the boiling water and also coat the inner surface of the container above water. You need to drain it without removing the chain from the boiling water so the oil at the surface of the water is removed and then remove the chain, clean the container and then put the chain back and boil again, repeat, until you no longer see any oil coming to the surface.
 
Experts on immersive waxing did say you need to degrease a waxed chain after a wet ride. Obviously, the grease isn't from the wax but the grease coming from the road.

Cars and vehicles deposit oil, soot, and literally grease on the road (like that coming from the rubber boot of universal joints in driveshafts of cars and trucks). Totally harmless in dry conditions. But when the road gets wet, the lower density oil and grease comes off the road and floats around on the wet road and then gets on your bike, chain, etc.

I think that road grease getting into your chain can possibly come off with boiling water but you have to do it a few times because the first time, the grease would float to the surface of the boiling water and also coat the inner surface of the container above water. You need to drain it without removing the chain from the boiling water so the oil at the surface of the water is removed and then remove the chain, clean the container and then put the chain back and boil again, repeat, until you no longer see any oil coming to the surface.
The most authoritative expert on wax lubrication is zero friction cycling, and he states that you don't have to degrease the chain after wet ride, and so states the instructions of main manufacturers of wax lubes such as Silca and Molten speedwax.
It is absolutely true that with rain, especially when it has just start to rain, oily residual come up over wet tarmac, and it is also dangerous as it makes road slippery. But in the pouring rain what you get on the bike is a mixture of oily residual, grit, sand, etc... drowned in the water thrown up by your wheel. So the amount of oil and grease going on the chain is just residual. Secondly, the chain is not bare metal, is coated with set wax, especially inside pins, and what you have to remove in the end is the contamination brought in the chain by the water. Wax melt at relatively low temperature, so with boiling water you meld the wax, flushing it all out of pins and rollers along with all contaminants entered. After a ride in very bad condition you would have to repeat the rinse a couple of times more, but when you finally dry the chain there are no residual of oily substances whatsoever.
But, following your logic, let' s assume that the amount of oil and grease on the chain after a wet ride would be such that requires a total chain degreasing. In this case you would have to degrease as well, regardless of what you use to lubricate, so wax wouldn't require much more time than dry or wet lube.
The point is, unfortunately, wet rides are always a grunt work that greatly increase maintenance task and if you want a practical solution to keep low maintenance I totally agree with you that igh or covered chain is the way to go.
 
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That is tempting to try but lately, I've been riding much less and running a lot more. It wouldn't matter at this point what lube I use due to much lower mileage on the bike. I have a clean drivetrain and chain anyway even if I'm using wet lube. I remove the chain to lube and wipe it off carefully and completely before putting back on the bike and then backpedal for several minutes while wiping off again.
 
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Hey! It's great that you're getting into running more, but don't forget about the bike! Need any tips or have questions?
 
Hey! It's great that you're getting into running more, but don't forget about the bike! Need any tips or have questions?

I still ride bike but I added whole body strength training with weights and calisthenics and running to have stronger joints.

I did it to avoid bone fracture in an accident (all-causes, not just in cycling).

I also needed to cut back on cycling due to the danger and stress. After 2 years of cycling in the streets of Manila, Philippines, I never really settled in. I never felt safe. Always stressful. Heavy traffic all the time and cars and motorcycles actually use the bike lane to pass slower vehicles. Been in collisions and countless near-collisions when cars and motorcycles swerve abruptly into the bike lane to pass other cars. They don't signal and just cut you off just a few inches away. You never get used to it.

I still do multiple laps in parts of the cities where it's still safe to ride but I decided to quit long rides out of the city indefinitely. My running environment is much nicer in comparison and absolutely safe in parks totally isolated from traffic. They don't allow bicycles in these parks so it's safe and actually relaxing compared to cycling. So I'm starting to run more often to make up for the weekly cardio exercise.
 
Hey there!

It's great to hear that you're incorporating whole body strength training and running into your routine. It's definitely important to have strong joints and prevent any potential bone fractures, especially considering accidents can happen in various ways, not just while cycling.

I can understand why you've decided to cut back on cycling, especially with the dangerous and stressful conditions you've described in Manila. It's unfortunate that the bike lanes aren't respected by other vehicles, and the constant near-collisions can be incredibly nerve-wracking. It's wise of you to prioritize your safety and opt for running in parks where you can enjoy a more peaceful and isolated environment.

Running can be a fantastic way to get your cardio exercise in and complement your other activities.
 
While I'm no stranger to the importance of cross-training and injury prevention, I must admit I'm a bit biased towards two-wheeled adventures. Running in the park is all well and good, but it doesn't quite compare to the thrill of a long-distance ride.

I'm sorry to hear about your bike's untimely demise and the chaotic cycling conditions in Manila. It's a real shame when infrastructure and other road users fail to respect cyclists. However, I'm confident you'll find Sydney's cycling scene to be a breath of fresh air.

For an easy, enjoyable ride, I'd recommend checking out the Cooks River Cycleway. It's a picturesque, mostly flat trail that runs along the Cooks River, connecting various parks and suburbs. It's a great way to explore Sydney's vibrant neighborhoods and take in some stunning water views.

Remember, clipless pedals can be a game-changer for your cycling experience. Don't be discouraged if it takes some time to get used to them. Practice makes perfect, and before you know it, you'll be clipping in and out with ease.

Happy trails, and I look forward to seeing you on the road! ;)

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A chain wax can indeed be a great option for gravel riding, as it helps repel dirt and grime better than traditional lubes. I've tried a few waxes myself, and while they all have their merits, I've had good results with Squirt Lube. It's easy to apply and provides excellent lubrication.

Regarding your timing, it's generally a good idea to wait until your chain is thoroughly clean and dry before applying wax. So, if you've just degreased your chain, it sounds like now would be a perfect time to give it a try.

Just keep in mind that waxed chains can feel a bit different when pedaling, so you might want to take some time to adjust to the new sensation. And, as always, make sure to regularly check your chain for wear and replace it as needed. Happy riding! :)
 
I agree, using a chain wax can be beneficial for gravel riding due to its ability to repel dirt and grime effectively. Squirt Lube is indeed a great option, as it is easy to apply and provides excellent lubrication. Waiting until the chain is clean and dry before applying wax is crucial. Adjusting to the different feel of a waxed chain might take some time, but regular chain maintenance and replacement are still essential. Keep riding and enjoying the experience!
 
Using a chain wax for gravel riding is a smart move. It's great for repelling dirt and grime, keeping your bike in top shape. Squirt Lube is definitely a solid choice, easy to apply and offers excellent lubrication. Remember, clean and dry your chain before wax application for optimal results. Adjusting to the different feel might take some time, but it's worth it. Don't forget regular maintenance and replacement! Ride on and enjoy the journey! ;D
 

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