Whole mackerel



M

Meow

Guest
You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?

Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to either
filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan (which I
don't have).

Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?

You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
G

Gabby

Guest
"MEow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
>
If I can't grill them (oil skin, sprinkle with salt & pepper and throw on grill) I just treat them
the same (oil, salt & pepper) but stuff with a few thin slices of onion & lemon and bake at 350F
until done.

Gabby
 
N

Nancy Young

Guest
MEow wrote:
>
> You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
>
> Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to
> either filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan
> (which I don't have).
>
> Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
> which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?
>
> You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
> right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.

This seafood book I have (do not ask me how I came into possession of it) puts mackerel into the
fatty category such as bluefish, perhaps a bluefish recipe would work?

nancy
 
D

Deepak Saxena

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
MEow <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
>
>Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to
>either filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan
>(which I don't have).
>
>Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
>which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?
>
>You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
>right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.

Hmm. How about just marinading them in something and then just throwing them in the oven just long
enough to cook.

~Deepak

>--
>Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
>bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
>grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)

--
Deepak Saxena - dsaxena at plexity dot net - http://www.plexity.net/
 
R

Rodney Myrvaagn

Guest
On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 00:15:52 +0100, MEow <[email protected]>
wrote:

>You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
>
>Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to
>either filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan
>(which I don't have).
>
>Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
>which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?
>
>You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
>right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.

The good thing about mackerel is that they don't have scales. They also have a nice assertive flavor
so they don't need much seasoning. Salt and pepper the body cavity. You can saute them in a pan with
olive oil in which you may have sauted a chopped onion (or not). You can finish them in a hot (400F)
oven if your pan can take it - it's better in the over since they aren't uniform in thickness and
the over is a little more forgiving. When they flake they are done. Deglaze with a little white wine
if you want. Add a little parsley or other herb - but you don't have to. Serve with some lemon and
rice or potatoes.

Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

"That idiot Leibniz, who wants to teach me about the infinitesimally small! Has he therefore
forgotten that I am the wife of Frederick I? How can he imagine that I am unacquainted with my
own husband?"
 
L

Louis Cohen

Guest
Put them under the broiler instead of over a grill.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"

"MEow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
>
> Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to
> either filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan
> (which I don't have).
>
> Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
> which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?
>
> You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
> right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.
> --
> Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
> bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
> grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
D

Doug Freyburger

Guest
MEow wrote:
>
> You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
> Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me

Mackerel is too intensely fishy for most people. I've had friends buy canned mackerel to feed
their cats.

Saba - Japanese like it crusted with a thick coating of salt then broiled. I've had it and it is
okay since I like sardines. But I could not finish a big chunk and your fish would be about 2
servings each. Served with the usual stuff from a Japanese restaurant.

Nuclear powered tuna salad - Bake until soft. Flake and shred until the texture of canned tuna. Mix
with mayo and/or sour cream. Texture of tuna but for someone who likes sardines far more than tuna,
too intense for most. I do like sardines more than tuna and I have done this but even a can of
mackerel gets to be much of it and you have about 4-6 times that much.

You may want to do something that uses the intensity rather than evades it. Maybe reducing them into
something like anchovey paste and using that as an ingredient.
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, MEow of Feline.Inc said:

Thanks to all who have helped me with ideas and tips. I ended up with filling them with sliced
shallots and chopped dill (after adding some salt and pepper inside them), pouring over some lemon
juice, wrapping them in aluminium foil (so they wouldn't smell up the entire place) and baking them
for 20 minutes. Sort of a combination of some of the ideas given here and what I happened to have
around. They turned out just fine, IMO.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
M

Mark Shaw

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
MEow <[email protected]> wrote:
>Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
>which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?

Bake them in a salt dome. I did this with a red snapper last night, and it was *great*.

For the recipe and method I used, go to foodtv.com, the Good Eats show, the episode "Hook Line and
Dinner," and then the "Striped Bass in Salt Dome" recipe.

--
Mark Shaw contact info at homepage --> http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
========================================================================
"It looks great at night. In the day, it winces like a hungover vampire." -James Lileks,
on Las Vegas
 
T

The Joneses

Guest
Deepak Saxena wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>, MEow <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
> >
> >Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me, as almost all recipes require for me to
> >either filet them (which I'm not going to try) or to cook them on a grill, or with a grill pan
> >(which I don't have).
> >
> >Does anyone have a good recipe for two whole, but gutted mackerels, each weighing about a pound,
> >which does not requite a grill, grill pan or the ability to fillet fish?
> >
> >You wonder why I didn't ask the fish-guy to fillet them since he was gutting them for me anyway,
> >right? Well, so am I, but it's too late now.
>
> Hmm. How about just marinading them in something and then just throwing them in the oven just long
> enough to cook. ~Deepak
>

In the alternative, stuff middles wtih chopped onion & parsley if you got it, sprinkle with
seasoned salt or Old Bay, and broil them 5 min each side under the oven element or gas thingy in
the oven Edrena
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, Louis Cohen of said:

>Put them under the broiler instead of over a grill.

Okay, so if I have a interesting-looking recipe for stuffed mackerel, and it says to grill the fish
5 minutes on each side, then approximately what will that answer to doing with my oven, with
temperature and such? Please be as specific as you can, as I've never done such a thing before.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
G

Gabby

Guest
"Doug Freyburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> MEow wrote:
> >
> > You'd think it would be easy to find a recipe for the two whole mackerel I bought today, right?
> > Not so; neither my cookbook nor Google could help me
>
> Mackerel is too intensely fishy for most people. I've had friends buy canned mackerel to feed
> their cats.

Never had canned mackerel, but fresh mackerel is my favourite fish, bar none. I'd rather have it
than salmon or sole. Unfortunately, it's the one fish I can't get where I live -- not even frozen.
But I must admit I don't understand your "too intensely fishy for most people". In season it was a
food staple where I grew up -- but then again so was lumpfish and I'll bet most people here have
never eaten that.

Gabby
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, Doug Freyburger of
http://groups.google.com said:

>Mackerel is too intensely fishy for most people. I've had friends buy canned mackerel to feed
>their cats.
>
I quite like mackerel, though I agree that each fish will probably be two meals.

>Bake until soft.

This is the problem: I have no idea of how long to bake them and I can't go about poking them every
minute or so to find out if they're soft or not.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, Nancy Young of Monmouth
Internet said:

>This seafood book I have (do not ask me how I came into possession of it) puts mackerel into the
>fatty category such as bluefish, perhaps a bluefish recipe would work?
>
I can try that if nothing more specific shows up, as I need to use the fish tomorrow, or I might as
well throw them out.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
B

Bob

Guest
MEow wrote:

> While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, Doug Freyburger of http://groups.google.com said:
>
>>Mackerel is too intensely fishy for most people. I've had friends buy canned mackerel to feed
>>their cats.
>>
> I quite like mackerel, though I agree that each fish will probably be two meals.
>
>>Bake until soft.

Or eat raw. Mackerel is one of the popular sushi and sashimi fish.

> This is the problem: I have no idea of how long to bake them and I can't go about poking them
> every minute or so to find out if they're soft or not.

Canadian Fisheries rule: Cook (no matter the method) for 10 minutes per inch of thickness at its
thickest point.

It works.

Pastorio
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, Bob of Posted via
Supernews, http://www.supernews.com said:

>> This is the problem: I have no idea of how long to bake them and I can't go about poking them
>> every minute or so to find out if they're soft or not.
>
>Canadian Fisheries rule: Cook (no matter the method) for 10 minutes per inch of thickness at its
>thickest point.
>
>It works.
>
Thanks. I'll try that.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
I

iquill

Guest
I concoted this recipe for blue fish especially for my Dad when I was a teenager. He loved it and I
have subsequently used it on every fish I make.

Use whatever oven proof pan you have (the fish won't know the difference). Very thinly slice a
lemon, a lime and two tomatoes and alternately layer them over the fish and bake at 375. The the
thickness of the fish will determine the amout of time you bake them. DO NOT let the fish get
internally dry. Season with Salt and pepper AFTER cooking.

I hope you enjoy this...

Irene
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, PENMART01 of AOL
http://www.aol.com said:

>Mackerel... born to be smoked.

I can easily buy smoked mackerel when I want to, as it's sold in most supermarkets, so I want to do
something else with the fresh mackerel I have.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)
 
M

Meow

Guest
While frolicking around in rec.food.cooking, PENMART01 of AOL
http://www.aol.com said:

>Mackerel is tastey but kinda, um aromatic for cooking indoors... so light the outdoor grill... no
>need to filet or skin, just gut and grill... I even leave the heads intact. Paint occasionally with
>orange juice, and a few grinds of black pepper. Serve with a fresh garden salad, rice and beans,
>and beer.
>
I don't have a grill; neither indoor nor outdoor.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18 ICQ# 251532856 Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-
bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN "However, as far as anything has a heart (i.e. bit in the middle), then I'd
grant a potato a heart." Lloyd Gilbert (afdaniain)