Whole Wheat Question Please

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob Newman, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Guest

    Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    while others just say "Whole Wheat". What is the difference between the
    two? Is either better for you than the other?
    --
    Thanks in advance... Bob
     
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  2. IanW

    IanW Guest

    "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    > while others just say "Whole Wheat".


    Stone ground implies that it's been milled in the traditional way, which is
    somehow reassuring, however I'm not sure what the modern way is, though it's
    probably not nice ;)

    Ian
     
  3. TC

    TC Guest

    Bob Newman wrote:
    > Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    > while others just say "Whole Wheat". What is the difference between the
    > two? Is either better for you than the other?
    > --
    > Thanks in advance... Bob


    Stone ground implies slow grinding at a low temperature and not
    completely ground to a fine powder. White flour is ground at high speed
    with steel grinding rollers which generates high heat which degrades
    the nutritional value of the product.

    Either of the two products you've mentioned can contain up to 40%
    regular white flour. The process usually entails seperating the
    components of the grain and then re-formulating it by adding white
    flour to the already separated grain germ and the grain bran. In other
    words, the flour maker usually completely separates the parts of the
    grain and then re-formulates it to make a whole wheat flour. As opposed
    to simply taking whole grains and gringing it into a flour in one step.

    Part of the reason is that once the grains parts are separated, they
    remove the oils from the germ. If they leave the oils, the grain flour
    will go rancid faster. By removing the oils, the germ will not cause
    problems with the shelf life of the product. Of course the most
    nutritious parts are now gone or completely denatured. You are left
    with a nutritionally-bereft manufactured flour, regardless of whether
    it is whole wheat or not.

    For real healthy flour, do what previous generations did. Soak fresh
    wheat berries for a day or two and grind it by hand into a coarse
    flour. And when you bake it, bake it at the lowest temperature that
    will do the job.

    TC
     
  4. Stone ground whole wheat, being coarser than whole wheat that has been
    ground to a powder, also delivers the benefit of making your body work
    harder to digest it. That makes it a lower calorie food than fine WW
    flour because you are expending more energy digesting it than you would
    finer WW flour.

    There is a good deal to learn about alternative grains. I hope to post
    some information about them next week.
     
  5. "Visual Purple" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Stone ground whole wheat, being coarser than whole wheat that has been
    > ground to a powder, also delivers the benefit of making your body work
    > harder to digest it. That makes it a lower calorie food than fine WW
    > flour because you are expending more energy digesting it than you would
    > finer WW flour.
    >
    > There is a good deal to learn about alternative grains. I hope to post
    > some information about them next week.


    None of these "grains" has the nutritional benefits
    of sprouted grains. But sprouts are a lot of work
    and they must be refrigerated. So, convenience
    usually trumps nutrition.

    An exception to the consumer's "convenience trumping
    nutrition" is bread made principally from sprouts. Such
    bread is usually found in the frozen food section of your
    health food store and sometimes your super market. If
    you try it, please post your experience.

    GWC
     
  6. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Guest

    I appreciated all the input but this is just a regular grocery shopper at
    heart and I'd like to get the best I can, but off the traditional grocery
    shelves.

    Bob

    "George Cherry" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Visual Purple" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Stone ground whole wheat, being coarser than whole wheat that has been
    >> ground to a powder, also delivers the benefit of making your body work
    >> harder to digest it. That makes it a lower calorie food than fine WW
    >> flour because you are expending more energy digesting it than you would
    >> finer WW flour.
    >>
    >> There is a good deal to learn about alternative grains. I hope to post
    >> some information about them next week.

    >
    > None of these "grains" has the nutritional benefits
    > of sprouted grains. But sprouts are a lot of work
    > and they must be refrigerated. So, convenience
    > usually trumps nutrition.
    >
    > An exception to the consumer's "convenience trumping
    > nutrition" is bread made principally from sprouts. Such
    > bread is usually found in the frozen food section of your
    > health food store and sometimes your super market. If
    > you try it, please post your experience.
    >
    > GWC
    >
     
  7. Pizza Girl.

    Pizza Girl. Guest

    There are more "rock" chips in the stone ground wheat.

    "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    > while others just say "Whole Wheat". What is the difference between the
    > two? Is either better for you than the other?
    > --
    > Thanks in advance... Bob
    >
    >
     
  8. Pizza Girl.

    Pizza Girl. Guest

    There are more "rock" chips in the stone ground wheat.

    "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    > while others just say "Whole Wheat". What is the difference between the
    > two? Is either better for you than the other?
    > --
    > Thanks in advance... Bob
    >
    >
     
  9. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    George Cherry <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Visual Purple <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Stone ground whole wheat, being coarser than whole wheat that has been
    >> ground to a powder, also delivers the benefit of making your body work


    >None of these "grains" has the nutritional benefits
    >of sprouted grains. But sprouts are a lot of work
    >and they must be refrigerated. So, convenience
    >usually trumps nutrition.


    And sprouting removes the phytic acid.

    Whole meal cereals and other seeds have in their shells phytic acid which
    strongly binds to minerals like iron, calcium, zinc and magnesium to form
    insoluble salts, phytates. There is overwhelming evidence that whole meal
    cereals through this mechanism decrease the absorption of such minerals.

    Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
     
  10. On Fri, 5 Aug 2005 08:12:39 -0400, "Bob Newman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Some of the bread I have seen in the stores say "Stone Ground Whole Wheat"
    >while others just say "Whole Wheat". What is the difference between the
    >two? Is either better for you than the other?


    Most likely there is not much difference, I would go for the one which is the
    freshest. You really have to be on your toes these days to get fresh bread
    since it has often been on the shelf for a week or more.

    If the loaf is quite heavy in comparison to size I don't buy it because I don't
    like heavy bread.

    Ora
     
  11. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 22:07:41 -0400, Don Wiss wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on sci.med.nutrition :

    > And sprouting removes the phytic acid.


    What about leavening and cooking? Do those processes remove the phytic acid
    as well, in some extent?

    --
    Enrico C
     
  12. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Sat, 6 Aug 2005, Enrico C <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 22:07:41 -0400, Don Wiss:
    >
    >> And sprouting removes the phytic acid.

    >
    >What about leavening and cooking? Do those processes remove the phytic acid
    >as well, in some extent?


    I don't believe so. But soaking does, as long as you through away the
    water.

    Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
     
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