Why are Bell products such crap?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Pete Rose Was C, Apr 2, 2003.

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  1. I want to warn you folks not to buy Bell bicycle accessories.

    Today I got a flat tire *twice*. Both times the inner tube was a brand-new Bell, the kind with goo
    inside. Contrary to what is claimed on the packaging, all the slime does is squirt out the hole in
    your inner tube and all over your face when you try to look at it, and it doesn't seal.

    I have purchased other Bell products over the years. Anything battery-operated, such as a light or a
    speedometer that I buyed, can't be counted on to last more than a week before it breaks, even with
    fresh batteries. I once purchaed a Bell rack whose straps broke the first time I tried to use it.

    The only Bell stuff I have that's held up adequately are brakes and a pouch, which are two things
    that usually won't be defective unless you try very hard. I suspect that the only reason the brakes
    and the pouch have lasted are that the Bell geniuses are utterly incapable of trying very hard.

    Luckily there's a real bike store in my county that sells other brands, as opposed to that Bell crap
    K-Mart carries.

    --

    *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Pete Rose Was Cool" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I want to warn you folks not to buy Bell bicycle accessories.
    >
    > Today I got a flat tire *twice*. Both times the inner tube was a brand-new Bell, the kind with goo
    > inside. Contrary to what is claimed on the packaging, all the slime does is squirt out the hole in
    > your inner tube and all over your face when you try to look at it, and it doesn't seal.
    >
    <<snip..>>

    giggle..always my favourite.."Look at this mark on the tube and see if it's leaking, while I pump it
    up..."..heehee..It's the little things in life... ;-)

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. I second your opinion of Bell. After one pump that could not inflate a basketball, and a computer
    that lasted three days, I do not normally buy their products. Of course the are some exceptions,
    notably brakes and Helmets. These items carry heavy liabilities. My opinion here is that Bell does a
    good job on these due to the potential lawsuits.

    For the most part, Schwinn accessories, sold at Target and WalMart, are much better that Bell (sold
    at K-Mart).

    Ernie

    Pete Rose Was Cool wrote:

    > I want to warn you folks not to buy Bell bicycle accessories.
    >
    > Today I got a flat tire *twice*. Both times the inner tube was a brand-new Bell, the kind with goo
    > inside. Contrary to what is claimed on the packaging, all the slime does is squirt out the hole in
    > your inner tube and all over your face when you try to look at it, and it doesn't seal.
    >
    > I have purchased other Bell products over the years. Anything battery-operated, such as a light
    > or a speedometer that I buyed, can't be counted on to last more than a week before it breaks,
    > even with fresh batteries. I once purchaed a Bell rack whose straps broke the first time I tried
    > to use it.
    >
    > The only Bell stuff I have that's held up adequately are brakes and a pouch, which are two
    > things that usually won't be defective unless you try very hard. I suspect that the only reason
    > the brakes and the pouch have lasted are that the Bell geniuses are utterly incapable of trying
    > very hard.
    >
    > Luckily there's a real bike store in my county that sells other brands, as opposed to that Bell
    > crap K-Mart carries.
    >
    > --
    >
    > *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***
    >
    > I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------
    >
    > They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  4. On Wed, 02 Apr 2003 21:56:47 -0500, E & V Willson <[email protected]> said:

    >I second your opinion of Bell. After one pump that could not inflate a basketball, and a computer
    >that lasted three days, I do not normally buy their products.

    My pump might be a Bell. Today, however, I discovered that it did not fit the valve on the new inner
    tubes I purchased, so I had to obtain a special part for it. I know I had another pump like this
    that lasted only a month because it got so bent up inflating a tube.

    The Bell speedometer that I once purchased didn't last a week before the display started to fade
    (even with fresh batteries).

    --

    *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  5. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >Today I got a flat tire *twice*. Both times the inner tube was a brand-new Bell, the kind with goo
    >inside. Contrary to what is claimed on the packaging, all the slime does is squirt out the hole in
    >your inner tube and all over your face when you try to look at it, and it doesn't seal.

    Goo may work but it is not something that one should depend on. Did you discover the cause of the
    first flat before installing the new tube?

    Historically Bell Products made helmets for a variety of purposes, most notably motorcycling. They
    are making some decent helmets, the only decent helmets actually, in the 60's. And they still make
    decent helmets.

    However in this age of marketing and mergers, the name Bell Products has been used to market a line
    of low end bicycle components to department stores and chains of various types.

    My experience with Bell components has been limited but uniformly bad. I bought a Bell cyclometer
    for my wife, a complete piece of junk, lasted about a week before it went crazy.

    Best bet is some decent stuff from your LBS.

    jon isaacs
     
  6. Harley

    Harley Guest

    The price should be a clue. Not all brands can be better then every other brand in a product line. h
     
  7. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Take the plastic off the Bell seat-mounted luggage rack (5mm allen bolt) and screw a widish piece of
    lumber on top, and put a milk crate on that, and support with a couple slim but sturdy pieces of
    scrap to the bolt holes above the dropouts, and you can carry a ton of stuff.

    The Bell portion stabilizes the load side to side, and the scrap supports the real weight.

    Kmart closing stores were selling them for $7. I just installed one replacing a very old
    luggage rack.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  8. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    E & V Willson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Of course the are some exceptions, notably brakes and Helmets.

    Isn't Vistalite owned by Bell?

    RFM
     
  9. Eric Babula

    Eric Babula Guest

    Jon Isaacs wrote:

    > >The same scenario applies to recumbents. We have a few 20 lb. carbon lowracers with really stiff
    > >frames and race specific componentry which are superb climbing machines.
    >
    > A "superb climbing machine" is something that works well on hills, not something that is fast on
    > hills. How do they do with an average rider on a 15% grade? On a typical MTB a Typical rider does
    > OK on a 15% grade, slow but sure.

    Jon, going from a 34 lb. to 20 lb. bike would make a difference most anywhere, especially hill
    climbing. And if you weigh only 100 lbs., the savings is more significant on any grade. This is
    what Barbie's experiencing. Just incase you are remotely curious to see Barbie and her 20.5 lb.
    carbon bike:

    http://www.wisil.recumbents.com/wisil/misc/velokraftBarb1.jpg

    > >
    > >Regarding your hills vs. ours, we don't have very many long ascents greater than a mile or so,
    > >therefore the ability to run down and up these bumps at high speeds is relevant.
    >
    > As I have said, they work nicely on smooth roads in areas that are basically flat.

    Many years ago, I conducted a comparison in the Malibu Hills between a 30 plus
    lb.recumbent with "touring fat" tires, versus a 16 lb. Vitus shod with Campy goodies and sew up
    tires. If you care to read the entire article, here it can be found:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~gkpsol/articles3.html

    In a nutshell, I have and do ride in the S. California hills/valleys three times per year for
    training the last decade.

    >
    >
    > But this is not rec.bicycles.racing so speed is not the issue. However you wrote:
    >
    > >Interestingly, just yesterday, we had a friendly encounter with a well known time trialist
    > >pedaling his bike with a watt meter. He wasn't able to hold
    > onto our draft even though he "claimed" to be putting out 1275 watts for a 2 minute duration.
    >
    > www.analyiccycling.com
    >
    > Speed for a given power. 1275 watts for a standard rider in a standard drag conditions, not a TT
    > bike. 44.3mph
    >
    > Lance does about 33mph on 440 watts.
    >
    > Something wrong with that watt meter.

    Perhaps it was optimistic, however the chase speeds were at the 40 mph range on the flat pavement,
    error within 10 per cent I'd guess. The discussion was, "Is a TT bike as fast as a recumbent" with
    the resultant answer from the DF'er, "No way!"

    Ed - the standard response, "Oh, the best unfaired lowracers are about the same as a full on TT
    bike" - Gin

    >
    >
    > Jon Isaacs
     
  10. On 03 Apr 2003 12:41:17 GMT, [email protected] (Jon Isaacs) said:

    >Goo may work but it is not something that one should depend on. Did you discover the cause of the
    >first flat before installing the new tube?

    I couldn't find the cause of either flat.

    >My experience with Bell components has been limited but uniformly bad. I bought a Bell cyclometer
    >for my wife, a complete piece of junk, lasted about a week before it went crazy.

    Some of the little lines that comprise the numbers on the display tend to completely fade.

    --

    *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  11. On Thu, 03 Apr 2003 10:52:36 -0500, Ron Hardin <[email protected]> said:

    >Take the plastic off the Bell seat-mounted luggage rack (5mm allen bolt) and screw a widish piece
    >of lumber on top, and put a milk crate on that, and support with a couple slim but sturdy pieces of
    >scrap to the bolt holes above the dropouts, and you can carry a ton of stuff.

    I buyed a plastic storage bin that has worked surprisingly well. It's not even intended for bicycle
    use, yet it's worked better than a Bell product.

    --

    *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  12. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Ron Hardin wrote:
    > Take the plastic off the Bell seat-mounted luggage rack (5mm allen bolt) and screw a widish piece
    > of lumber on top, and put a milk crate on that, and support with a couple slim but sturdy pieces
    > of scrap to the bolt holes above the dropouts, and you can carry a ton of stuff.
    >
    > The Bell portion stabilizes the load side to side, and the scrap supports the real weight.

    I carried 45 lbs. home with it yesterday, according to the Kroger U-Scan scale, with no problems; I
    couldn't tell the load was there, really. It was much more stable than the old standard and now
    deceased luggage rack was. Luggage rack wobble is responsible for the idea that a high center of
    gravity causes stability problems, rather than the reverse which is actually true.

    Whether one day one of my pieces of scrap will shatter and dump it all off is another matter.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Guest

    You get what you pay for. Bell makes good stuff and cheap stuff.

    I have a lot of Bell stuff including helmets that work just fine.

    "Pete Rose Was Cool" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I want to warn you folks not to buy Bell bicycle accessories.
    >
    > Today I got a flat tire *twice*. Both times the inner tube was a brand-new Bell, the kind with goo
    > inside. Contrary to what is claimed on the packaging, all the slime does is squirt out the hole in
    > your inner tube and all over your face when you try to look at it, and it doesn't seal.
    >
    > I have purchased other Bell products over the years. Anything battery-operated, such as a light
    > or a speedometer that I buyed, can't be counted on to last more than a week before it breaks,
    > even with fresh batteries. I once purchaed a Bell rack whose straps broke the first time I tried
    > to use it.
    >
    > The only Bell stuff I have that's held up adequately are brakes and a pouch, which are two
    > things that usually won't be defective unless you try very hard. I suspect that the only reason
    > the brakes and the pouch have lasted are that the Bell geniuses are utterly incapable of trying
    > very hard.
    >
    > Luckily there's a real bike store in my county that sells other brands, as opposed to that Bell
    > crap K-Mart carries.
    >
    > --
    >
    > *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***
    >
    > I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------
    >
    > They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  14. On Sat, 05 Apr 2003 12:19:46 GMT, Ron Hardin <[email protected]> said:

    >I carried 45 lbs. home with it yesterday, according to the Kroger U-Scan scale, with no problems; I
    >couldn't tell the load was there, really. It was much more stable than the old standard and now
    >deceased luggage rack was. Luggage rack wobble is responsible for the idea that a high center of
    >gravity causes stability problems, rather than the reverse which is actually true.

    The storage bin I have is primarily used for carrying tools, including a pump, extra tubes, duct
    tape, and occasionally a map. What I do on Kroger days is hang the bags full of groceries on the
    handlebars on the way home.

    --

    *** My posts get canceled, and I repost 'em! *** *** It's called free speech - live with it ***

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    They don't call Saddam's army the "Republican Guard" for nothing!
     
  15. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Pete Rose Was Cool wrote:
    > The storage bin I have is primarily used for carrying tools, including a pump, extra tubes, duct
    > tape, and occasionally a map. What I do on Kroger days is hang the bags full of groceries on the
    > handlebars on the way home.

    That can produce really spectacular instablilities, producing increasing bag swing and
    steering wobble.

    Every day is a Kroger day for me, a regular stop even on weekends; two double paper bags fit exactly
    in a milk crate. I usually have two gallons of water in one, and stuff in the other.

    Doubling bags lets you build upwards. In case of the occasional overflow, plastic bags can be tied
    to the milk crate, or hung over it using the 6' cable lock looped thru the handles twice. This need
    is caused by sales, usually.

    On rainy days, put an inverted plastic bag over the top of each paper bag so the paper doesn't go
    mushy and collapse your tower of food. Use a Kroger happy face sticker to secure the plastic bag to
    the paper bag or the wind will lift it off.

    This is called bricolage, building castles with the materials at hand, and it is at the origin of
    language if I understand Derrida right. (Of Grammatology p.139)
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  16. Eric

    Eric Guest

    Yep. They make a red blinkie light that falls off and breaks just as easily as the more expensive
    bike shop ones.

    Eric

    "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > You get what you pay for. Bell makes good stuff and cheap stuff.
    >
    > I have a lot of Bell stuff including helmets that work just fine.
     
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