Why are expensive bikes better than cheap ones?



R

Richard Sherratt

Guest
On Wed, 8 Nov 2006 13:23:14 +1100, "Boostland"
<[email protected]> wrote:

<snip>

>One thing to note is that I have put the parts from my wrecked 1990
>Pinarello on to the Aldi frame, the only original part is the frame / forks,
>seat and downtube gear levers.
>
>I am using Campag C-record crankset, Chorus brakes, Cinelli bars and stem,
>600 Ultegra hubs with Campag lambda clincher rims, and when I won the state
>masters race I was using Suntour superbe pro hubs with wolber singles rims
>and using 18 year old continental comp 240 gram singles @ 160 psi ( these
>tyres were worth more than the whole bike cost me ).
>
>So it really in the end comes down to the quality of the nut on the saddle
>:p


looks to me like you've got some very good quality running gear on
your Aldi frameset. Your singles hub/rim/tyre set up would make a
significant improvement over the el-cheapo Aldi components.
--
Regards.
Richard.
 
R

Richard Sherratt

Guest
On Wed, 8 Nov 2006 15:07:20 +1100, "Boostland"
<[email protected]> wrote:

<snip>

>Here is the C-record groupset that shows the cranks and brake levers I am
>using.
>< http://www.campyonly.com/images/catalogs/1991/91record.jpg >
>
>I think the crankset alone was worth around $1000 when new, but now they can
>be got a lot cheaper than that on ebay.


Ah! Delta brakes. Beautiful to look at. Pity they never really worked
properly :)

--
Regards.
Richard.
 
D

Donga

Guest
gplama wrote:
> Boostland Wrote:
> >
> > So it really in the end comes down to the quality of the nut on the
> > saddle
> > :p

>
> especially in Lance's case....
>
>
> --
> gplama


LOL
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Wed, 8 Nov 2006 13:23:14 +1100
Boostland <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> So it really in the end comes down to the quality of the nut on the saddle
>:p


Only one? Isn't that taking weight saving a bit far?

Zebee
 
P

Parbs

Guest
cfsmtb wrote:
>
> Nah, think more helicoid female thread.
>

Ah, so you have a Lefty then?

Parbs
 

cfsmtb

New Member
Apr 11, 2003
4,963
0
0
Parbs said:
cfsmtb wrote:
>
> Nah, think more helicoid female thread.
>

Ah, so you have a Lefty then?

Ooooo, aren't you a smart bugger eh? In answer, one *is* lefthanded. ;)
 
H

Halcyon

Guest
Ken Aston wrote:
>



I think that what has been missed so far is that the more expensive bike
should make you want to go out and ride - it's the pride of ownership.
Monday morn and you look at that lovely bike sitting in the hallway and
you say"stuff work, I'm going for a ride"!
Halcyon
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Wed, 08 Nov 2006 10:02:15 GMT
Halcyon <[email protected]> wrote:
> I think that what has been missed so far is that the more expensive bike
> should make you want to go out and ride - it's the pride of ownership.
> Monday morn and you look at that lovely bike sitting in the hallway and
> you say"stuff work, I'm going for a ride"!


Well, that's one of the reasons I spent a lot on mine :)

I wanted a bike that would make me think "yeah, take the bicycle to
work" not "ah bugger it, take the motorbike I can leave later."

BUt then I dunno my style of expensive bike is what he was thinking
of....

Zebee
 
Ken Aston wrote:
> To come down to the point, assuming the same weight, the same type of
> tyres and amount of gears, why can I go faster with a high quality
> bike?


I don't know much about expensive bikes, but I have lots of
experience with cheap kmart jobbies :)

My current sh1tter is a Royce Union from KMart. It has an
aluminium frame, which seems quite nice and light, although
I wouldn't know whether it suffers from alignment problems
as others have suggested. Then they go and ruin it with
meaty great suspension forks. Who actually needs front
suspension? It is a bit like all those toorak tractors out
there - everyone has massive great desert duellers and
a snorkel, but no one goes offroad.

The gears were never particularly good. Clunky, and I always
had trouble finding fourth on the rear gears. They probably
just need adjustment, and if I had bought it from a bikeshop
they would have adjusted them for free.

The seat is very uncomfortable. I feel thoroughly abused
after an hour, and I often suffer from numbness.

The front wheel has a buckle and always did, so the
front brakes have to be so far out as to be useless. The
tires have very chunky tread, which is great in that I have
never had a puncture, but the rolling resistance is awful.

But the worst aspect is the bearings. After 18 months of
use (average once a week I guess) it squeaks and groans
in a most embarrasing fashion.

Still, what can you expect for $130? It works.
 
B

BT Humble

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I don't know much about expensive bikes, but I have lots of
> experience with cheap kmart jobbies :)
>
> My current sh1tter is a Royce Union from KMart. It has an
> aluminium frame, which seems quite nice and light, although
> I wouldn't know whether it suffers from alignment problems
> as others have suggested. Then they go and ruin it with
> meaty great suspension forks. Who actually needs front
> suspension?


It's not hard to put regular forks on one, you just need to find a
source of them.

> It is a bit like all those toorak tractors out
> there - everyone has massive great desert duellers and
> a snorkel, but no one goes offroad.


Off-topic, but I could have used a snorkel on my Econovan while I was
living at the end of 13km of dirt road. Air filters clogged up pretty
quickly, and are a pain to replace - at least a snorkel would move the
air intake above the thickest of the dust.

> The gears were never particularly good. Clunky, and I always
> had trouble finding fourth on the rear gears. They probably
> just need adjustment, and if I had bought it from a bikeshop
> they would have adjusted them for free.


Tweak that cable adjuster on the rear derailleur. Try giving it a turn
one way, and if that helps fine-tune it with further half turns. If
the initial turn makes it worse, try two turns in the opposite
direction then fine-tune as appropriate.

I've found that most grip shifters need to be "helped" into gear once
they wear a little. On mine I need to go to a "click and a half" while
downshifting until the chain snicks over, then let it drop back to its
"rest" position.

> The seat is very uncomfortable. I feel thoroughly abused
> after an hour, and I often suffer from numbness.


Nobody else seems to like them, but I'm rather fond of sprung saddles
on "upright seating position" bikes. They cost about $15 at Big W /
Kmart.

> The front wheel has a buckle and always did, so the
> front brakes have to be so far out as to be useless. The


Get thyself a spoke key (~$10) and have a look at the relevant Sheldon
Brown page:

http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html#tensioning

It's not difficult, it just needs a little patience. Provided you
don't have any broken spokes, up to 5mm of sideways wobble can be
removed pretty easily. If you have more than 5mm of wobble then have
another look for broken spokes, and replace them first! (~$1 each at
your LBS).

> tires have very chunky tread, which is great in that I have
> never had a puncture, but the rolling resistance is awful.


You *could* spend ~$30 or so each for 1 1/2" slicks, or you could visit
your local bike dump and find something more suitable. I'm using a
Chen Shin slick on the front of my MTB (last one in Kmart) and some
anonymous 1980's 1 1/2" sort-of-knobby on the rear (knobs are mostly
worn out). The rubber is so old and hard that I suspect it'll never
wear out now.

I've also had some success with the $10 Mongoose "semi slicks" that
Kmart sells, I mount them on the bike then cut the useless knobs off
the sides of the tyre with a stanley knife (why would I need them for
commuting?) They only last about 1500km on the rear though.

> But the worst aspect is the bearings. After 18 months of
> use (average once a week I guess) it squeaks and groans
> in a most embarrasing fashion.


~$15 for a cone spanner, and ~$8 for a lifetime-supply tub of
automotive grease. I hear you can also use vaseline, if you (*ahem*)
have some on hand. ;-)

I like to clean the old grease off the bearings first. An old tin or
bowl, toothbrush (either an old one or somebody else's) and some
kerosene works well for that.

Oh yeah, you'll probably also want some guidance:

http://sheldonbrown.com/cone_adjustment.html

> Still, what can you expect for $130? It works.


You can get an equivalent machine for $98 at Big W now (albeit with a
steel frame) - you were had, my friend! ;-)

Even a $100 bike will last a hell of a long time, if you do regular
basic maintenance on it. My cheapish (~$240) bike-store-purchased MTB
has clocked up about 5000km over the past year and a bit, with the only
problems being cracked plastic pedals after a few hundred km[1], a
couple of broken spokes[2], and the lockring holding the gears onto the
freewheel somehow coming unscrewed.[3]

Punctures don't count, we all get them. ;-)


BTH
[1] Replaced with metal ones & half-clips.
[2] Could happen on anything.
[3] Needed a handful of new ball bearings, a steady hand and some
Loctite to reassemble.
 
R

Richard Sherratt

Guest
On 8 Nov 2006 17:48:54 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

<snip>

>But the worst aspect is the bearings. After 18 months of
>use (average once a week I guess) it squeaks and groans
>in a most embarrasing fashion.


Don't worry. I've ridden a DuraAce equipped bike where the BB was
stuffed after a year of use. Bearings felt like gravel.

>Still, what can you expect for $130? It works.


Doesn't sound like it.

--
Regards.
Richard.
 
T

Terryc

Guest
Richard Sherratt wrote:

>>Still, what can you expect for $130? It works.

>
> Doesn't sound like it.


If I didn't already have two other shitters, it sounds a good price for
a bike to ride to and from the train station (too long to bike commute),
although, I'd really want to do a slap over paint job first.
>
 
T

Terryc

Guest
Boostland wrote:
> "Terryc" <[email protected]> wrote in message


> I am racing a bike I got from Aldi for $199 I race in A grade at the
> Newcastle veterans club and B grade at my club at kooragang.



> One thing to note is that I have put the parts from my wrecked 1990
> Pinarello on to the Aldi frame, the only original part is the frame / forks,
> seat and downtube gear levers.


lol, what I've done over the years, although not quite as upmarket kit.
It started with deciding it wasn't worth improving the family 3 speed
(which they wanted back to allow to rust under the house anyway) and
buying a basic semi-tourer, then wider range cluster, TA cranks, better
this, better that.

At one stage the frame was worse than Aldi (orignal broke); the drop out
were squashed and electro-dot thingy welded to hold the drop outs (free
frame anyway).

Like today, swmbo's frame (Malvern Star LA84) was just upgraded (?) to
Shimano SIS gear levers and some dainty brake levers, plus it will get
better derauillers front and back.
 
T

Tommy Smidth

Guest
K.A. Moylan skrev:
> In article <>, "Ken Aston" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > Recently, I have been using my bike more and more and by now I almost
> > stopped using any other way of transportation. It's a lot of fun and it
> > made me think about buying a really nice bike. Right now I am just
> > using a cheap discount bike which is quite heavy.
> >
> > What I still don't understand is, what are the advantages of
> > sophisticated, expensive bikes? Parts last longer, the weight is lower,
> > I understand that. But besides that, why can I go faster with a 2,000 $
> > bike than with a 200 $ bike?
> >
> > Tilbage i Schlütter-regeringens tid, var Kenn Rosenkranz en ung langtidsledig bistandsklient.
> > Man kunne ikke finde arbejde til ham, og selv ønskede han ikke at arbejde.
> > Han var hverken syg eller handicappet, men det offentlige gav ham
> > alligevel førtidspension tilsidst. I dag er han midaldrende, og vil
> > stadig ikke arbejde.
> > I read that it responds better because it is well built. Of course, if
> > it really has more gears, that makes a difference. But if gears are the
> > same, it's gonna be the same energy I put in, so why should I get a
> > higher speed out of it?
> >
> > To come down to the point, assuming the same weight, the same type of
> > tyres and amount of gears, why can I go faster with a high quality
> > bike?

>
> You left out:
> * quality of bearings (a bit less effort to push);
> * smoothness of gears & brakes
> (it all works properly & you need not worry that they will keep
> working);
> * for the same weight, the parts will last longer,
> so you will spend less time fixing them.
>
> These are the reasons I'll buy a more expensive bike than a cheaper one.
> They last longer & work nicer.
>
> > If you have any ideas, please share your thoughts with me. Thank you so
> > much.
> >
> > Ken Aston

>
> HTH,
>
> --
> K.A. Moylan
> Canberra, Australia
> Ski Club: http://www.cccsc.asn.au
> kamoylan at ozemail dot com dot au


Expensive bicycles normaly have better craftet parts
I guess thats the reason

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://groups.google.com/group/dk.p...q=bo+warming+livsstil&rnum=1#c39e83d9e220c9e9

http://groups.google.com/group/dk.p...k=st&q=førtidspension&rnum=2#7c586cd1adc604da
 
D

dave

Guest
Boostland wrote:
> "blah" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Boostland wrote:
>>
>>> One thing to note is that I have put the parts from my wrecked 1990
>>> Pinarello on to the Aldi frame, the only original part is the frame /
>>> forks,
>>> seat and downtube gear levers.
>>>
>>> I am using Campag C-record crankset, Chorus brakes, Cinelli bars and
>>> stem,
>>> 600 Ultegra hubs with Campag lambda clincher rims, and when I won the
>>> state
>>> masters race I was using Suntour superbe pro hubs with wolber singles
>>> rims
>>> and using 18 year old continental comp 240 gram singles @ 160 psi ( these
>>> tyres were worth more than the whole bike cost me ).

>> This is a pretty big thing "to note". Your Aldi bike is an Aldi frame
>> and fork with all of the (I assume at $199) **** stuff taken off it and
>> pretty bloody good, expensive (how much do the cranks go for? (does "c"
>> stand for carbon?)) stuff put on it.
>> I mean, respect, but it sounds like it ain't a $199 bike, quality-wise.
>>

>
> Here is the C-record groupset that shows the cranks and brake levers I am
> using.
> < http://www.campyonly.com/images/catalogs/1991/91record.jpg >
>
> I think the crankset alone was worth around $1000 when new, but now they can
> be got a lot cheaper than that on ebay.
>
> And here is the chorus brake calipers I am using.
> < http://www.campyonly.com/images/catalogs/1991/91chorus.jpg >
>
> The other bits of the C-record groupset were not compatible with the Aldi
> bike so I have given them away to a mate with a 1988 vintage custom built
> Masi, as he had the earlier Super Record groupset and some of his parts are
> worn out or broken.
>
> I got the groupset on a 2nd hand Pinarello I bought of a commonwealth games
> cyclist back in 1990 that I used to race and train with.
>
> I wrecked the bike in 1997 when a car did a right hand turn into my path, I
> was paid around $4500 insurance to replace the bike, so I opted to keep the
> bike for parts and just used my other bike for training when I recovered
> from the injuries a few years later.
> I ended up snapping my old bikes frame so when Aldi had the racers on sale I
> got two of them and used all my parts on them.
> I have a heap of spares now, I have 5 sets of road wheels and 3 sets of
> track wheels, and several sets of cranks and cinelli stems and bars.
>
> I plan on getting a better road bike some time down the road, I will
> probably get a track bike first as I prefer to race on the velodrome over
> road, as it is a lot more fun and you don't need gears or brakes and the
> racing is closer and safer.
>
>

Well I am pretty sure that you have proved that having the right size
frame is more important than the quality of the frame.
And that you can build a bike :)
But thats one expensively uprated Aldi bike.

Dave
 
Richard Sherratt wrote:
> On 8 Nov 2006 17:48:54 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
> >Still, what can you expect for $130? It works.

>
> Doesn't sound like it.


It does the job. It is uncomfortable and a bit slow. No doubt a better
bike would get me to work about 10 minutes faster, but I am not
in such a hurry...

I would like a better bike, but other priorities get in the way.
 

Similar threads