Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected]enepages.org (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     


  2. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  3. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  4. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  5. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  6. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  7. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 13:03:50 -0700, [email protected] (serene)
    wrote:

    >I never force children to eat anything they don't like. Not even a
    >little bit. I think it's unnecessary. No one gets to force me to eat,
    >and my kids grew up whole and healthy just fine without being forced to
    >eat foods they didn't like.


    <snip>

    I only "forced" my kids to eat something if it was the first time they
    were introduced to a particular food. My daughter would try anything
    once. My (grade school) son viewed any new food as an attempt on my
    part to poison him. I can recall not allowing him to eat anything else
    of the meal before he took at least a *taste* of the new offering. He
    sometimes sat at table for a loooong time, but eventually hunger would
    overcome stubborn and he often surprised himself that he liked the new
    food. In fact, IIRC, there was more than one time that I would set a
    new dish on the table and his immediate response was a voluble "YUCK!"

    AAMOF, I distinctly remember poring over a cookbook one afternoon when
    he strolled into the kitchen, espied what I was reading and
    immediately sprang to his sister and shrieked, "Kristen! We're having
    Julia Childe for dinner! Eeewwwww!"

    Miserable brat. Has a kid of his own now. Am patiently waiting for The
    Day payback begins.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  8. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  9. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  10. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  11. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  12. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  13. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  14. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  15. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    I like to cook.

    I like to try out new recipes.

    I am the chief cook and bottle washer (although my son's fiance is
    taking over some of the cooking and bottlewashing now)

    I enjoy food.

    No one else will cook for me. :)
     
  16. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  17. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  18. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  19. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  20. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
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