Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     


  2. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  3. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Debbie wrote:
    > serene wrote:
    > >> Debbie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I had the 2 bite rule for new foods or about a heaping teaspoon
    > >>> serving of foods they had previously tried. Usually one mouthful..
    > >>> if they didn't like it they could get 10 mouthfuls out of it. :)
    > >>
    > >> What was the purpose of that rule?
    > >>

    > So the kids would get a taste and not just "dislike" something because they
    > have heard someone else say ewwww. :) As tastes change through the years,
    > if they always had a taste then they would learn if they now like something.
    > I tried to avoid foods that kids dislike so that they would enjoy their
    > meals. However, I always felt that they should give a food another try once
    > in a while and see if their tastes had changed.


    When I was growing up, my sister told me if I ate 10 bites of
    something, I would like it. With the exception of okra, caviar and
    liver, she has been right. :)

    -L.
     
  4. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  5. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  6. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  7. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  8. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  9. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  10. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  11. nina

    nina Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    Because my mother was a pretty bad cook. She just didnt care enough
    about it to do it well. When I became old enough to cook,I started
    trying to make things that tasted better. I enjoyed cooking and playing
    hostess to my friends etc.
    I also like being creative and making meals that taste good, look good
    and are good for you.
    When I've been POOR, cooking was something I could do to have fun. I
    mean, if I didnt have money for crafts or other hobbies, I still had to
    eat and buy food, so I made that my hobby.
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
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