Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with your
    > premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I had kids I
    > would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there are only the
    > two of us and my partner came into this relationship with many food
    > prejudices well-established. While I like practically everything, his
    > "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13 years I've tried
    > many times to break down some of the barriers, but it's not worth fighting
    > over. :) I've won a few battles and actually managed to introduce him to
    > foods he never dreamed he would eat. However, most of the time we share
    > the same meat and one or more of the vegetables, but other times I won't
    > deny myself what I want and will prepare more than one entree so that we
    > both can enjoy our meal. There is another issue, too, as my partner had
    > quadruple bypass surgery a year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow
    > a heart healty diet for both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.


    We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    recipes are.

    Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    wouldn't have.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  3. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  4. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  5. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  6. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  7. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  8. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  9. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  10. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  11. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  12. In article <1h09fsy.1t2o3g21urpfilN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (serene) wrote:

    > What was the purpose of that rule?


    Because children are not the best arbiters of what foods they should
    eat. Their tastes change, and what they didn't like last time they may
    like now (as we all do, I still take a taste of bleu cheese and
    mushrooms a couple times a year, haven't liked them yet). Also, in many
    homes there isn't the privilege of having something else to eat, they
    may not be able to afford another meal, and the bread/cheese/peanut
    butter/whatever may be necessary for lunches the next day so that the
    family may eat. Not to mention that there is a certain politeness to at
    least taking a small amount of something you may not care for and
    quietly eating it without complaint or comment that will serve a child
    well when eating at someone else's home or in society later on.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  13. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  14. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  15. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  16. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  17. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  18. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  19. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  20. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
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