Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     


  2. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  3. On Tue 26 Jul 2005 10:03:50a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you, Ranee, for your thoughtful comments. I totally agree with
    >> your premise and the way you provide for your husband and kids. If I
    >> had kids I would certainly be inclined to do the same. As it is, there
    >> are only the two of us and my partner came into this relationship with
    >> many food prejudices well-established. While I like practically
    >> everything, his "acceptable" food list is quite short. In the last 13
    >> years I've tried many times to break down some of the barriers, but
    >> it's not worth fighting over. :) I've won a few battles and actually
    >> managed to introduce him to foods he never dreamed he would eat.
    >> However, most of the time we share the same meat and one or more of the
    >> vegetables, but other times I won't deny myself what I want and will
    >> prepare more than one entree so that we both can enjoy our meal. There
    >> is another issue, too, as my partner had quadruple bypass surgery a
    >> year and a half ago, and I do my best to follow a heart healty diet for
    >> both of us. I'm not getting any younger myself.

    >
    > We have a don't ask don't tell agreement about what is in the food.
    > I promise not to make anything that anyone is allergic to (or in your
    > case, is bad for the health) and he looks away and eats it, and enjoys
    > it usually. It's only when he knows that there is something in there
    > that he doesn't like that he has a problem with it. He says he doesn't
    > like sweet and sour or teriyaki, any sweet with meat, but when I do it,
    > he enjoys it. It helps that I don't make that flourescent goop or
    > overdo the sweet/meat stuff, as I like it a bit more balanced than many
    > recipes are.
    >
    > Rich was slicing strawberries for shortcake a week or so ago, while I
    > was making a marinade for pork tenderloin and I told him to avert his
    > gaze or he wouldn't be able to enjoy the meal. He did. It had brown
    > sugar, orange juice and ginger in it along with the garlic, sunflower
    > oil, scallions and pepper. He ate it with gusto, but if he had allowed
    > himself to be fully conscious of the sugar, orange and ginger, he
    > wouldn't have.


    I manage to "sneak" some things into our meals, but omit the obvious that
    would be a complete thumbs down. Luckily, he never watches me preparing
    food!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  4. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  5. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  6. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  7. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  8. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  9. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  10. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  11. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  12. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  13. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  14. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  15. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  16. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  17. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
  18. Jaime

    Jaime Guest

    On 26 Jul 2005 08:21:25 -0700, "nina" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Because my mother was a pretty bad cook.


    You too, eh? :)
     
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