Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    Several, most of which have been mentioned by others.

    Cost. It's much cheaper to put a complete meal together at home than it
    is to buy it at a restaurant.

    Control. Years ago I cooked for my grandfather, who needed to be on a
    low-sodium diet. I can control the amount of salt, sugar, fat, and
    additives in my food by cooking it myself.

    Creativity. I've been known to pull together dinners out of whatever I
    have on hand, without regard to a recipe. Most of the time they come
    out fine. Since I know the science of why ingredients do what they do
    in response to heat or other manipulation, I can make adaptations in
    cooking and in baking.

    Challenge. Sometimes we'll have something at a restaurant and we try to
    figure out how to make it at home. Sometimes we come close to or
    surpass the original recipe. Other times, as in the case of the clams
    with black bean sauce, we have to keep experimenting.

    Culture. One way to learn about other peoples is to cook their food.
    Good ethnic cookbooks give you a glimpse of lives along with cuisine.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     


  2. serene

    serene Guest

    Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Actually, I think I was the last person I knew who didn't
    > have a microwave. I could live without one again.


    We don't have (or want) one, and I rarely miss having one. Now and
    again, I wish I could heat frozen things more quickly, but that happens
    so seldom (I freeze so little, since we eat something new/fresh almost
    every day, and don't usually cook more than one meal's worth.)

    serene
     
  3. serene

    serene Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    1) I like it.
    2) It's cheaper than eating out.
    3) I enjoy the gift of feeding other people.
    4) But mostly, I just like it.

    serene
     
  4. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Nancy wrote:

    > Then there's this, I get cravings for (name this dish here). I don't
    > even know where to get that even if I did want to get it to go.
    > Fajitas come to mind. In 'n Out burgers. Whatever. Meatloaf.
    > Stew. Pot roast. I like to hang out in the kitchen and make my
    > own.


    Most of the time, my cravings are prompted by something posted HERE!

    That means YOU PEOPLE are the reason for my weight problem!

    I don't know why it took me so long to realize that; I was probably lulled
    into a stupor by all that good food.

    ;-)

    Bob
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Lia wrote:

    > Another answer is: ego. I love showing off. I love bringing a batch of
    > still-warm homemade cookies to a gathering of folks who don't cook or bake
    > and watching their faces. It isn't just pleasure at getting to eat the
    > cookies. It is the admiration, like I was some sort of rare genius with
    > the magical ability to produce cookies when no one else can. It gets
    > better when the challenge is greater as when someone is invited over to my
    > house and has a number of dietary restrictions and I'm able to work around
    > all of them and still create a great meal. I like to say that I'm only
    > being a considerate hostess, but I'll admit here that I get a big head
    > from the compliments.


    That's probably the main reason I cook. If I'm just cooking for myself, I
    don't go to any great effort, but if I'm cooking for my girlfriend or if I
    have company over, then I'm much more motivated to produce something
    noteworthy.

    Bob
     
  6. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    Mainly necessity now, but I enjoy it. It used to be a creative outlet
    - now days I mainly stick to the tried-and-true things in my repetoire,
    which is vast and varied. I cook 3 meals a day, so spend a lot of time
    in the kitchen!

    -L.
     
  7. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > (snip)
    >Since I know the science of why ingredients do what they do
    > in response to heat or other manipulation, I can make adaptations in
    > cooking and in baking.


    Have you been holding out on us?? Have you got a degree in food
    science, too?

    > Cindy

    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, Monsur Fromage du
    Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Margaret Suran wrote on 23 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking
    > > Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > > > What's your reason to cook?


    > > Because you have refused to come to my home and cook for me. :eek:(


    > Maggie (If I can call you that) you live too far away.


    Maggie, huh? <snort>
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  9. Sheryl  Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    Andy at Q wrote on 7/23/05 10:34 PM:

    > Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Truthfully, it
    >> still seems a little newfangled to me

    >
    >
    > You're not alone. My Pop was downright scared of the microwave. But on a
    > visit, I got a pack of dinner hotdogs and put two in and two minutes
    > later we were having dinner. He asked how I did it. I gave him simple
    > directions and he paid close attention. He called it the hotdog oven, as
    > it's all he ever used it for! I think the word microwave conjured up
    > dangerous images in his mind.
    >
    > He was so happy with his hotdog oven, the very next morning he insisted
    > we have dinner hotdogs for breakfast! And Pop cooked 'em! I was so proud
    > of him! R.I.P.


    Your story made me smile, because the microwave oven was such a wonder to my
    Dad, too. We didn't get one until 1990, right before my Mom passed away.
    He wouldn't even touch it, but after Mom died, I tried to get him to be more
    self-sufficient (Mainly to take some pressure off of me), so I would keep
    Healthy Choice meals in the freezer, or I'd make up meals and leave them in
    the freezer or fridge for him to eat when he was ready. It amazed him that
    you could take a meal out of the freezer, frozen solid, and be eating within
    10 minutes. Towards the end of his life, I'd go visit him at work, (He
    worked at a department store) and he'd ask me to sit with him while he had
    his dinner break--his wife would have packed up some leftovers for his meal,
    and there he was, nuking his dinner. It was so cute and it made me feel very
    proud of him. He was always so reliant on me and my Mom (and the woman he
    married after Mom died), that it made me feel proud when I got to see him
    fend for himself at work.

    --
    ---
    Love like you've never been hurt
    Live like there's no tomorrow
    And dance like there's nobody watching
     
  10. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > (snip)
    > >Since I know the science of why ingredients do what they do
    > > in response to heat or other manipulation, I can make adaptations in
    > > cooking and in baking.

    >
    > Have you been holding out on us?? Have you got a degree in food
    > science, too?
    >
    > > Cindy


    I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    have to muddle through it.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  11. Alan Holmes

    Alan Holmes Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    So that I don't fill my body with stuff that has been messed about by
    chemical companies!

    --
    Alan

    Reply to alan (dot) holmes27 (at) virgin (dot) net
     
  12. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.
    >
    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >

    My reasons - quality food, reduction in sugar, salt, & fats, comfort,
    relaxation, because I can
     
  13. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >
    >>Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    >>disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    >>pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    >>somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    >>salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    >>make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >>
    >>What's your reason to cook?

    >
    >
    > I like to cook whenever I get the chance. I like chopping, sauteeing,
    > boiling, whatever. I couldn't care less about baking. Not so fond of
    > cleaning up, either, but that's the way it goes. Cooking is relaxing
    > to me, unless I walk away and burn something.
    >
    > During the week, there's usually one pizza night ... as in call Luigi's
    > and they'll bring it. Only other place is a crappy chinese food, and
    > I use the term loosely, that delivers. I just hate that, five nights a
    > week, what to have what to have. Even if it's just a roast chicken,
    > I like to have food in the house I can have ready for dinner, makes
    > me happy.
    >
    > As much as I like to go out to eat, not so much for dinner, never
    > mind during the week.
    >


    Funny thing, I really only like going out for breakfast. For some
    reason, I don't like cooking bacon & eggs. DH does a nice steak, pork
    chops, and burgers. I do a nice rib, chicken, and fish. I'd rather eat
    at home and know what I'm getting. We do have a nice restaurant that
    makes English style fish & chip something I don't do at home and nearby
    there is a great seafood place with wonderful crab and lobster. Those
    places I can handle once in awhile.

    > Then there's this, I get cravings for (name this dish here). I don't
    > even know where to get that even if I did want to get it to go.
    > Fajitas come to mind. In 'n Out burgers. Whatever. Meatloaf.
    > Stew. Pot roast. I like to hang out in the kitchen and make my
    > own.
    >


    What's and In'n Out burger?

    > nancy
    >
    >
     
  14. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:BF0926B5.6E392%[email protected]:

    > Andy at Q wrote on 7/23/05 10:34 PM:
    >
    >> Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> Truthfully, it
    >>> still seems a little newfangled to me

    >>
    >>
    >> You're not alone. My Pop was downright scared of the microwave. But
    >> on a visit, I got a pack of dinner hotdogs and put two in and two
    >> minutes later we were having dinner. He asked how I did it. I gave
    >> him simple directions and he paid close attention. He called it the
    >> hotdog oven, as it's all he ever used it for! I think the word
    >> microwave conjured up dangerous images in his mind.
    >>
    >> He was so happy with his hotdog oven, the very next morning he
    >> insisted we have dinner hotdogs for breakfast! And Pop cooked 'em! I
    >> was so proud of him! R.I.P.

    >
    > Your story made me smile, because the microwave oven was such a wonder
    > to my Dad, too. We didn't get one until 1990, right before my Mom
    > passed away. He wouldn't even touch it, but after Mom died, I tried to
    > get him to be more self-sufficient (Mainly to take some pressure off
    > of me), so I would keep Healthy Choice meals in the freezer, or I'd
    > make up meals and leave them in the freezer or fridge for him to eat
    > when he was ready. It amazed him that you could take a meal out of
    > the freezer, frozen solid, and be eating within 10 minutes. Towards
    > the end of his life, I'd go visit him at work, (He worked at a
    > department store) and he'd ask me to sit with him while he had his
    > dinner break--his wife would have packed up some leftovers for his
    > meal, and there he was, nuking his dinner. It was so cute and it made
    > me feel very proud of him. He was always so reliant on me and my Mom
    > (and the woman he married after Mom died), that it made me feel proud
    > when I got to see him fend for himself at work.



    Sheryl,

    I gave this issue some deep thought late last night and I figured Pop's
    fear had more to do with microwave ovens only adjustable by power (not
    by temp) and after decades of being able to "feel" the heat of coals,
    burners, ovens or broilers, etc., it caused him understandable
    frustration.

    I think your Dad and my Pop went to the same "school"!

    Was your Dad a pool hustler in his youth, too? :)

    All the best,

    Andy
     
  15. One time on Usenet, Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]>
    said:

    Alan, you started a thread that

    <snip>

    > What's your reason to cook?


    So we can eat. Seriously. I don't enjoy it...

    --
    Jani in WA (S'mee)
    ~ mom, VidGamer, novice cook, dieter ~
     
  16. limey

    limey Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" wrote

    <snipped>
    > What's your reason to cook?
    >


    First reason - we get hungry.

    Second - now that I'm retired I have the time to try new recipes and
    different ingredients. All the time I was working, DH had dinner ready
    before I arrived home (I got home later). Weekends were busy so we tended
    to eat on the run.

    Third - it's fun, even if some of the tries are flops. Fortunately, I know
    I can turn to r.f.c. if I'm stumped because something went wrong!

    Dora

    Dora
     
  17. aem

    aem Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    > What's and In'n Out burger?
    >

    In 'n Out is a Southern California hamburger chain. Known for fresh,
    high quality ingredients and cooking to your order. Also known for
    doing a really good of training high schoolers in quality control and
    work ethic. Many of their managers started at the bottom and worked
    their way up. They have always strictly controlled their growth but
    now have a location in Las Vegas. They've been the only fast food
    hamburger I'd willingly eat for decades. -aem
     
  18. On 24 Jul 2005 13:57:03 -0700, "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >~patches~ wrote:
    >>
    >> What's and In'n Out burger?
    >>

    >In 'n Out is a Southern California hamburger chain. Known for fresh,
    >high quality ingredients and cooking to your order. Also known for
    >doing a really good of training high schoolers in quality control and
    >work ethic. Many of their managers started at the bottom and worked
    >their way up. They have always strictly controlled their growth but
    >now have a location in Las Vegas. They've been the only fast food
    >hamburger I'd willingly eat for decades. -aem


    HA! My Fatburger can whip your In'n'Out burger with one pickle tied
    behind its back! Fatburger *rules* in SoCal!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  19. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1122238623.151651.92430
    @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >
    >
    > ~patches~ wrote:
    >>
    >> What's and In'n Out burger?
    >>

    > In 'n Out is a Southern California hamburger chain. Known for fresh,
    > high quality ingredients and cooking to your order. Also known for
    > doing a really good of training high schoolers in quality control and
    > work ethic. Many of their managers started at the bottom and worked
    > their way up. They have always strictly controlled their growth but
    > now have a location in Las Vegas. They've been the only fast food
    > hamburger I'd willingly eat for decades. -aem



    In'N'Out sucks!!!!!!! Hamburgers made bland while you wait!!!

    Andy
     
  20. Andy wrote:
    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1122238623.151651.92430
    > @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>~patches~ wrote:
    >>
    >>>What's and In'n Out burger?


    snipped
    >
    >
    >
    > In'N'Out sucks!!!!!!! Hamburgers made bland while you wait!!!
    >
    > Andy


    I guess you did not read Anthony Burgess' "A Clockwork Orange".
     
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