Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. serene

    serene Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:

    [re: microwave ovens]

    > Your story made me smile,


    *laugh* My first parsing took this as "your story made me sterile".

    serene
     


  2. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Andy wrote:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    >>trouble of often making separate meals.)

    >
    >
    >
    > Wayne, you're a softie!!! Mom's challenge: "I'm NOT making two dinners!
    > You don't like what I'm making for dinner? Starve!"
    >


    Exactly, that was the rule here. Neve saw a kid or hubby starve yes :)
     
  3. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    maxine in ri wrote:

    > On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 21:42:31 GMT, Monsur Fromage du Pollet
    > <[email protected]> connected the dots and wrote:
    >
    > ~What's your reason to cook?
    >
    > When I was a kid, I'd spend hours in the bathroom mixing whatever was
    > in the medicine cabinet (creams, shampoos and talcs) to make various
    > messes. Why? Because Mom only taught me how to make scrambled egg,
    > chocolate chip cookies, and hamburgers.
    >
    > Once I was on my own, I started experimenting in the kitchen. Found
    > it to be more fun than the stuff I did as a kid, especially since
    > there were so many more ingredients and ways to process and combine
    > them.
    >
    > Oddly, there are only a few times when what I made was inedible. The
    > ghods were kind.
    >
    > maxine in ri


    Ok, mixing stuff in the med cabinet is usually bad; mixing stull in the
    kitchen is usually good. Although, I have been tempted to add pain
    killers to the zucchini to help it go down better some days ;)
     
  4. Dan Goodman

    Dan Goodman Guest

    I cook because:

    1) There are foods which restaurants, canners, etc. don't make the way
    I like them (or want them for health reasons).

    2) It's cheaper than eating out all the time, ordering food delivered,
    or hiring a cook.


    --
    Dan Goodman
    Journal http://www.livejournal.com/users/dsgood/
    Clutterers Anonymous unofficial community
    http://www.livejournal.com/community/clutterers_anon/
    Decluttering http://decluttering.blogspot.com
    Predictions and Politics http://dsgood.blogspot.com
    All political parties die at last of swallowing their own lies.
    John Arbuthnot (1667-1735), Scottish writer, physician.
     
  5. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > have to muddle through it.


    Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> In'N'Out sucks!!!!!!! Hamburgers made bland while you wait!!!
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > I guess you did not read Anthony Burgess' "A Clockwork Orange".



    Margaret,

    Interestingly yes, I read the book first, with the glossary of terms in
    the back. It was the first X-rated (initial release was X) movie I ever
    saw, underage, no less!!! :O

    I have the soundtrack on vinyl and the DVD. I don't remember what
    happened to the book.

    Excellent film to this day, imho.

    Andy
     
  7. Julian Vrieslander wrote on 25 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching
    > > assistant for a food science lab when I was in graduate school.
    > > Playing in the kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as
    > > creativity for me. That background also helps when a recipe is
    > > poorly written and the SO and I have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't
    > really need cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be
    > derived from first principles. Start with the quantum mechanics
    > and work your way up...
    >


    Yes of course...String theory is very handy when attempting to cooking
    chicken.

    --
    It's not a question of where he grips it!
    It's a simple question of weight ratios!

    A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

    Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
     
  8. Julian Vrieslander wrote on 25 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching
    > > assistant for a food science lab when I was in graduate school.
    > > Playing in the kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as
    > > creativity for me. That background also helps when a recipe is
    > > poorly written and the SO and I have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't
    > really need cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be
    > derived from first principles. Start with the quantum mechanics
    > and work your way up...
    >


    Yes of course...String theory is very handy when attempting to cooking
    chicken.

    --
    It's not a question of where he grips it!
    It's a simple question of weight ratios!

    A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

    Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
     
  9. Julian Vrieslander wrote on 25 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching
    > > assistant for a food science lab when I was in graduate school.
    > > Playing in the kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as
    > > creativity for me. That background also helps when a recipe is
    > > poorly written and the SO and I have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't
    > really need cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be
    > derived from first principles. Start with the quantum mechanics
    > and work your way up...
    >


    Yes of course...String theory is very handy when attempting to cooking
    chicken.

    --
    It's not a question of where he grips it!
    It's a simple question of weight ratios!

    A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

    Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
     
  10. Julian Vrieslander wrote on 25 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching
    > > assistant for a food science lab when I was in graduate school.
    > > Playing in the kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as
    > > creativity for me. That background also helps when a recipe is
    > > poorly written and the SO and I have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't
    > really need cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be
    > derived from first principles. Start with the quantum mechanics
    > and work your way up...
    >


    Yes of course...String theory is very handy when attempting to cooking
    chicken.

    --
    It's not a question of where he grips it!
    It's a simple question of weight ratios!

    A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

    Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
     
  11. Julian Vrieslander wrote on 25 Jul 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching
    > > assistant for a food science lab when I was in graduate school.
    > > Playing in the kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as
    > > creativity for me. That background also helps when a recipe is
    > > poorly written and the SO and I have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't
    > really need cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be
    > derived from first principles. Start with the quantum mechanics
    > and work your way up...
    >


    Yes of course...String theory is very handy when attempting to cooking
    chicken.

    --
    It's not a question of where he grips it!
    It's a simple question of weight ratios!

    A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

    Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
     
  12. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  13. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  14. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  15. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  16. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  17. In article
    <[email protected]nk.net>
    , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > have to muddle through it.

    >
    > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...


    God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 7/8/05 WeBeJammin'!
     
  18. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     
  19. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     
  20. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     
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