Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     


  2. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     
  3. Bock

    Bock Guest

    It is somewhat complicated. Both my brother and I like to cook. Mom
    used to hate to cook and also said that we should learn to cook in case
    anything happen to her we would at least be able to cook a meal. She
    loved to eat in restaurants when dad was away which was most of the time
    and we did. That set the stage.

    When you grow up with restaurant made thick plate size hotcakes/pancakes
    with real maple syrup and Denver omelettes made to perfection or veal
    cutlets with killer gravy as a kid, it is difficult to appreciate when
    Mom boiled the potatoes and when questioned why they weren't mashed, she
    would point to a fork, butter, and my milk glass and say there is
    nothing stopping you from mashing them yourself.

    Today commercial pie crusts are as thick as 1/4" plywood and tough to
    cut. But some restaurant dishes are pure magic and a joy to be had and
    next to impossible to reproduce at home.

    A surprise bonus to me is that cooking is an escape from the world.
    Once inside the kitchen, the focus of turning out my best pie or ginger
    beef hot pot with green onions and garlic simply blocks out everything
    else. True therapy.

    And working my way though (eating) a 5 inch fresh lemon pie with real
    lemons on a paper thin rolled crust is a side effect I have learned to
    live with.
     
  4. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  5. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  6. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  7. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  8. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  9. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    To change the taste, texture, and quality of any given food. ',;~}~

    > In my case I cook to express myself. I can't sing, dance, or draw. Any
    > fool can open a box from the freezer and nuke it. So it isn't to
    > survive. As is quite apparent I express myself poorly and can't spell
    > worth a damn.


    Well I can't sing or dance.... oh yeah, well, I do an enthusiastic semblence
    of dancing I suppose... anyhow, yeah cooking is fun.

    > Cooking is kinda my imagination's way of escaping without any social
    > disproval or getting arrested. It's a socially excepted release for my
    > pent up feelings, I guess. All I need to cook is ingredients (like
    > somebody's paints), a little discipline (no don't add icream to that
    > salad) and a rough idea of want I want to create (no fool you can't
    > make a blueberry and steak buckle).
    >
    > What's your reason to cook?


    I bloody well love doing it. I get direct joy from the actual process of
    creation, then another helping when those who I serve the creation to, love
    what I made for them. I love seeing others happy, knowing I had some small
    hand in that is the cherry on the icing on the cake.

    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  10. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  11. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  12. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  13. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  14. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  15. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]nk.net>
    > , Julian Vrieslander <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I had to take courses in food science, plus I was a teaching assistant
    > > > for a food science lab when I was in graduate school. Playing in the
    > > > kitchen is as much chemistry experiment as creativity for me. That
    > > > background also helps when a recipe is poorly written and the SO and I
    > > > have to muddle through it.

    > >
    > > Of course, when you have a physicist in the house, you don't really need
    > > cookbooks or food chemistry. Everything can be derived from first
    > > principles. Start with the quantum mechanics and work your way up...

    >
    > God help us. I've got an engineer in house and -- oh, never mind.


    Pay him no mind, Barb. There's no deriving from first principles when
    he tries to cook from a badly written recipe. There is, however, a
    bloodcurdling cry from the kitchen: "CJ, this recipe is all *@#$ed up!
    What do I do?"

    Weekend food adventure: Saturday our foodie next door neighbor bought
    some cute baby squash (including zucchini) with blossoms attached at the
    farmers' market, and proposed a cooperative dinner to gross out our
    respective zucchini-hating beloveds. We supplied beef and chicken
    fajitas, they supplied the squash and grilled corn on the cob. Julian
    actually ate a yellow squash that hadn't touched one of the offending
    zukes.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  16. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     
  17. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     
  18. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     
  19. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     
  20. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     
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