Why do you Cook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Monsur Fromage du Pollet, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. RoR

    RoR Guest

    It's all for the smile on their faces, the warmth of their, "I love this!" and the, "May
    I have more, please?"
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your reason to cook?


    Practical reasons:

    I'm a homemaker, it's part of my job description

    Four children, two adults, one income.

    Control over the salt/sugar/fat content - even if it isn't lower in
    quantity, it is higher in quality. If we're going to eat junk, at least
    it should be good junk. ;)

    Other reasons:

    I enjoy it, from meal planning, reading recipes, recipe development,
    chopping, mixing, the whole deal.

    I love feeding people, and making people happy with food.

    It is something at which I excell.

    It is interesting to me.

    It is part of how I show love to my family and friends.

    I can make better food at home for less than a quarter of the cost of
    a restaurant: I made a sausage and cabbage soup and two whole grain
    baguettes for dinner for us the other night for a whopping $10. This
    fed our family that night, gave us leftovers for yesterday's lunch (plus
    feeding our babysitter) and provided lunch for Rich for work today.

    I like the challenge of coming up with something wonderful out of
    nothing, such as what's on sale or in the cheap meats bin at the grocery
    store, or what we have in our pantry and freezer. Which is a good skill
    to hone, see the second practical reason above.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Third, and I hope this doesn't come across as egotistical, because it surely
    > isn't...but...I like my food better. I like controlling how much salt, how
    > much spice, how much of a particular ingredient is in the food I eat. I like
    > choosing the quality of the food I eat. I like my steak better than almost
    > any restaurant steak I've ever had. Same for my pasta. Being a pinicky
    > eater, it's much less of an ordeal when I make it myself.


    I completely understand this, and I don't think it is egotistical. I
    have independent confirmation that my cooking is better than most other
    people's. ;) I _know_ I can make food better than a restaurant can, or
    that instant food at the grocery store. Rich says that he is completely
    spoiled by my cooking, and that it's hardly worth eating food made by
    anyone else. Knowing that, and then willingly spending four or five
    times or more to eat lesser food, not wise.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    > trouble of often making separate meals.)


    I have to tell you, Wayne, don't make separate meals. If there is
    something someone is allergic to, leave it out, but if you're the cook,
    cook the food. Try to make it something everyone will tolerate, but
    don't become a short order chef.

    We have tried not to pass on our food prejudices to the kids, and we
    have committed to never saying anything bad about any kind of food in
    front of them. Even if we hate it. They aren't as big fans of
    mushrooms or bleu cheese as they could be because I don't like them, and
    therefore don't buy them or cook with them, but Rich eats them and when
    we eat out the kids get to have those kinds of things.

    Since part of my job is nourishing the family, along with keeping in
    the budget, we don't really have the luxury of different meals anyway,
    but the kids learn from us that they need to eat the good food that is
    offered to them.

    Now, of course, I don't load a meal with things that I know everyone
    dislikes, but if something that is part of the meal isn't a favorite of
    someone, they still have to eat a little bit anyway. If the kids
    complain, Rich explains that Mama made this for them to nourish them and
    out of love and how would they like it if they made a picture for me and
    I said that I didn't want it or that it was yucky. That usually makes
    the point.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  17. In article <[email protected]9>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    > trouble of often making separate meals.)


    I have to tell you, Wayne, don't make separate meals. If there is
    something someone is allergic to, leave it out, but if you're the cook,
    cook the food. Try to make it something everyone will tolerate, but
    don't become a short order chef.

    We have tried not to pass on our food prejudices to the kids, and we
    have committed to never saying anything bad about any kind of food in
    front of them. Even if we hate it. They aren't as big fans of
    mushrooms or bleu cheese as they could be because I don't like them, and
    therefore don't buy them or cook with them, but Rich eats them and when
    we eat out the kids get to have those kinds of things.

    Since part of my job is nourishing the family, along with keeping in
    the budget, we don't really have the luxury of different meals anyway,
    but the kids learn from us that they need to eat the good food that is
    offered to them.

    Now, of course, I don't load a meal with things that I know everyone
    dislikes, but if something that is part of the meal isn't a favorite of
    someone, they still have to eat a little bit anyway. If the kids
    complain, Rich explains that Mama made this for them to nourish them and
    out of love and how would they like it if they made a picture for me and
    I said that I didn't want it or that it was yucky. That usually makes
    the point.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    > trouble of often making separate meals.)


    I have to tell you, Wayne, don't make separate meals. If there is
    something someone is allergic to, leave it out, but if you're the cook,
    cook the food. Try to make it something everyone will tolerate, but
    don't become a short order chef.

    We have tried not to pass on our food prejudices to the kids, and we
    have committed to never saying anything bad about any kind of food in
    front of them. Even if we hate it. They aren't as big fans of
    mushrooms or bleu cheese as they could be because I don't like them, and
    therefore don't buy them or cook with them, but Rich eats them and when
    we eat out the kids get to have those kinds of things.

    Since part of my job is nourishing the family, along with keeping in
    the budget, we don't really have the luxury of different meals anyway,
    but the kids learn from us that they need to eat the good food that is
    offered to them.

    Now, of course, I don't load a meal with things that I know everyone
    dislikes, but if something that is part of the meal isn't a favorite of
    someone, they still have to eat a little bit anyway. If the kids
    complain, Rich explains that Mama made this for them to nourish them and
    out of love and how would they like it if they made a picture for me and
    I said that I didn't want it or that it was yucky. That usually makes
    the point.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    > trouble of often making separate meals.)


    I have to tell you, Wayne, don't make separate meals. If there is
    something someone is allergic to, leave it out, but if you're the cook,
    cook the food. Try to make it something everyone will tolerate, but
    don't become a short order chef.

    We have tried not to pass on our food prejudices to the kids, and we
    have committed to never saying anything bad about any kind of food in
    front of them. Even if we hate it. They aren't as big fans of
    mushrooms or bleu cheese as they could be because I don't like them, and
    therefore don't buy them or cook with them, but Rich eats them and when
    we eat out the kids get to have those kinds of things.

    Since part of my job is nourishing the family, along with keeping in
    the budget, we don't really have the luxury of different meals anyway,
    but the kids learn from us that they need to eat the good food that is
    offered to them.

    Now, of course, I don't load a meal with things that I know everyone
    dislikes, but if something that is part of the meal isn't a favorite of
    someone, they still have to eat a little bit anyway. If the kids
    complain, Rich explains that Mama made this for them to nourish them and
    out of love and how would they like it if they made a picture for me and
    I said that I didn't want it or that it was yucky. That usually makes
    the point.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're brutal! (I need to develop that attitude. It would save me the
    > trouble of often making separate meals.)


    I have to tell you, Wayne, don't make separate meals. If there is
    something someone is allergic to, leave it out, but if you're the cook,
    cook the food. Try to make it something everyone will tolerate, but
    don't become a short order chef.

    We have tried not to pass on our food prejudices to the kids, and we
    have committed to never saying anything bad about any kind of food in
    front of them. Even if we hate it. They aren't as big fans of
    mushrooms or bleu cheese as they could be because I don't like them, and
    therefore don't buy them or cook with them, but Rich eats them and when
    we eat out the kids get to have those kinds of things.

    Since part of my job is nourishing the family, along with keeping in
    the budget, we don't really have the luxury of different meals anyway,
    but the kids learn from us that they need to eat the good food that is
    offered to them.

    Now, of course, I don't load a meal with things that I know everyone
    dislikes, but if something that is part of the meal isn't a favorite of
    someone, they still have to eat a little bit anyway. If the kids
    complain, Rich explains that Mama made this for them to nourish them and
    out of love and how would they like it if they made a picture for me and
    I said that I didn't want it or that it was yucky. That usually makes
    the point.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
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