Why do you ride?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by William Higley, Jun 17, 2003.

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  1. Just curious as to what got you into riding.

    For me it started about 6 years ago. I was 45 at the time. I went to the Doctor with what I thought
    was a nasty ulcer. As it turns out I was having my second heart attack. (Didn't know I had the
    first one until the doctors pointed it out to me.) As I spent a peaceful (except the few odd times
    when the monitors said my heart stopped) week in the critical care unit I had a chance to think
    about things.

    The Doctor pointed out that if I continued to smoke, the next cigarette I had might be the last
    thing I did. That along with my wife threatening to beat me to death if I lit up again seemed to be
    a turning point in my life. My daughter was also about 8 months pregnant with the first of three
    granddaughters. I really wanted to be around to see my grandkids.

    When I went back to work (two month later) I started walking for an hour at lunch every day but soon
    got bored with seeing the same parts of town over and over. The next step was to get a bicycle to
    open up the area's that I could explore at lunch. Once I did that I found out that I really liked
    the town that I worked in so we decided to move there.

    At the present time I ride to work year round. It is a 4 mile round trip. I usually do another ten
    miles at lunch to keep my stress levels down. During the summer I do a couple of double century
    rides and the training miles for fun.

    I got into recumbents because of the "smiles per mile" quotient.

    I greatly enjoy keeping up with postings from this group and the great responses you have
    provided me.

    Thanks.

    William Higley, Sr. Vision R-50
     
    Tags:


  2. My story is different. I have allways liked riding bikes, and have done "Sjælland rundt" 5 times (a
    ~300km "race"). About 4 years ago a doctor diagnosed me - I have hypothyreosis. The problem was that
    I had it for about 4-5 years before that, so my condition was very bad. One year of slow adaptation
    to eltroxin later I was ready to start rebuilding my lost shape. The doctors told me I would not
    have survived my non-existent thyroid function, if I hadn't been in shape when it started. This was
    kind of a wake up call, so I promised myself to get in, and keep in a good shape for the rest of my
    life. I had allways been interested in recumbents, but at the time it was possible to buy a
    frameset, so the start investment was bearable. The rest is history, as they say.

    Keep riding and stay alive. Torben "allways doped" Scheel

    "William Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just curious as to what got you into riding.
    >
    > For me it started about 6 years ago. I was 45 at the time. I went to the Doctor with what I
    > thought was a nasty ulcer. As it turns out I was having my second heart attack. (Didn't know I
    > had the first one until the doctors pointed it out to me.) As I spent a peaceful (except the few
    > odd times
    when
    > the monitors said my heart stopped) week in the critical care unit I had a chance to think
    > about things.
    >
    > The Doctor pointed out that if I continued to smoke, the next cigarette I had might be the last
    > thing I did. That along with my wife threatening to beat me to death if I lit up again seemed to
    > be a turning point in my
    life.
    > My daughter was also about 8 months pregnant with the first of three granddaughters. I really
    > wanted to be around to see my grandkids.
    >
    > When I went back to work (two month later) I started walking for an hour
    at
    > lunch every day but soon got bored with seeing the same parts of town over and over. The next step
    > was to get a bicycle to open up the area's that I could explore at lunch. Once I did that I found
    > out that I really liked
    the
    > town that I worked in so we decided to move there.
    >
    > At the present time I ride to work year round. It is a 4 mile round trip.
    I
    > usually do another ten miles at lunch to keep my stress levels down.
    During
    > the summer I do a couple of double century rides and the training miles
    for
    > fun.
    >
    > I got into recumbents because of the "smiles per mile" quotient.
    >
    > I greatly enjoy keeping up with postings from this group and the great responses you have
    > provided me.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > William Higley, Sr. Vision R-50
     
  3. g19glock1

    g19glock1 New Member

    Joined:
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    Very Similar situation, at 49 was overweight (225), high blood pressure, chest pains, etc. I went to the doctor and was told to get skinny and walk for stress releif. My wife and I bought DF's to ride because walking is soooooooo booooooreing. Much to slow a pace. We got excited about all of the rail trails that are located in Michigan and began taking weekend trip to ride them. Well we just naturally began to ride more and more. Due to the fact that I have had carpel tunnel surgery my hand are real tender after riding a DF for any length of time and they go to sleep, sometimes taking a hour to recover fully. I decided this year after putting on a thousand miles of the DF since March that I need to do something different. There is a guy that rides past my place of work every day on his way to work that rides a recumbent, and he looked so comfortable that I began investigating. I checked out several models and decided on the V-rex. I am well satisfied with my choice.

    I also really enjoy this forum and the information that is provided.

    Thanks all.

    :cool:
     
  4. "William Higley, Sr." skrev...
    > Just curious as to what got you into riding.

    Started freelancing from home which meant I didn't commute on my DF each day like I used to. So
    I got a sore neck, butt etc. when I finally did ride it to get some excercise. That kinda put
    me off it.

    Had my eye on the danish Evita-recumbent and when the prototype Evita-2 was up for sale I bought it
    and got bent after 6 months with very little biking. Meant I had 2-3 extra pounds to shed and was a
    wee bit out of shape.

    But sorry. No tales of malady from me. Your stories are truly inspiring though.

    Only the fact that I'm white fits the bent "stereotype." (if there is one) Otherwise I'm 35 with no
    beard and no aerobelly. ;o)

    Now I ride cause I'm totally hooked. Of course I could stop any day but then my hands would start
    shaking. Kinda like my relationship with tea. ;-)

    Regards Mikael Velokraft Racer, TE-clone and (beat up) Raleigh onespeed DF.
     
  5. I started serious adult biking in 1978. Been in the business since 80'. In the early eighties
    Infinity sent us a LWB USS bike on a loan program. It didn't go over well. I have suffere for years
    with my left arm going numb. In 99' I rode a bikeE that a visitor brought by the shop. Was a bikeE
    dealer the following week. Next bike ROCKET, VR-40 USS, V-REX, V2, STRADA now AERO. I have built
    many a custom DF bike, touring and performance. It stands to reason that I should do the same with
    recumbents. My approach to recumbents is the same as DFs. I don't try to get people that should be
    on an EZ-1 to buy a Corsa or P-38.

    --
    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "g19glock1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > wrote:
    > > "William Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message ne-
    > > ws:[email protected]:[email protected] ast.com...
    > > > Just curious as to what got you into riding. Thanks.
    > > >
    > > > William Higley, Sr. Vision R-50
    >
    >
    >
    > Very Similar situation, at 49 was overweight (225), high blood pressure, chest pains, etc. I went
    > to the doctor and was told to get skinny and walk for stress releif. My wife and I bought DF's to
    > ride because walking is soooooooo booooooreing. Much to slow a pace. We got excited about all of
    > the rail trails that are located in Michigan and began taking weekend trip to ride them. Well we
    > just naturally began to ride more and more. Due to the fact that I have had carpel tunnel surgery
    > my hand are real tender after riding a DF for any length of time and they go to sleep, sometimes
    > taking a hour to recover fully. I decided this year after putting on a thousand miles of the DF
    > since March that I need to do something different. There is a guy that rides past my place of
    > work every day on his way to work that rides a recumbent, and he looked so comfortable that I
    > began investigating. I checked out several models and decided on the V-rex. I am well satisfied
    > with my choice.
    >
    > I also really enjoy this forum and the information that is provided.
    >
    > Thanks all.
    >
    > :cool:
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > G19, Giant and a V-Rex
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  6. "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Now I ride cause I'm totally hooked. Of course I could stop any day but then my hands would start
    > shaking. Kinda like my relationship with
    tea. ;-)

    And none of them even contain (very much) caffeine ?!? (I'm not entirely sure about that secret
    polish recipe, though ;-)

    Torben
     
  7. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

    Joined:
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    My story is less dramatic on my initial start into riding. I wanted a new style of bike that had come out (a mountain bike). My father said, you can get this but you will learn the meaning of the word "commitment." So after agreeing to ride across a state, I got my new bike.

    I rode unti I had to drop out for a ten or so year period in which I had cancer. Then, I went to watch him finish a state ride. I was immediately sucked back into the strong force of camaraderie of cyclists. I knew I had to be in that world again.

    So now years later, I still pedal.

    Derek
    Burley Canto
     
  8. "Torben Scheel" skrev

    > And none of them even contain (very much) caffeine ?!? (I'm not entirely sure about that secret
    > polish recipe, though ;-)

    A cup of tea contains about half the amount of a cup of coffee I found out on the web. If I don't
    drink any in the morning I'm sleepy all day and get a headache. So yes, I'm hooked. Not licking the
    frame of the VK tho. Epoxy is bad for you, m'kay?

    Mikael
     
  9. Scott

    Scott Guest

    bentcruiser <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > William Higley wrote:
    > > Just curious as to what got you into riding.

    Well, I got into riding by way of rock climbing--really. For about 25 yrs. I've been an avid
    climber--rocks, mountains, etc. Back in 2000 I pulled some important tissue in a finger of my right
    hand and really had to lay off big time. Round about then, I started seeing a 'bent or two in my
    area. It just got me thinking. I've always cycled a bit for fun and fitness, but the discomfort
    factor really kept me from doing too many miles. Bents have really made me a cyclist. I just can't
    seem to get enough of it. I started out with a Lightning Phantom and moved to a customized Haluzak,
    which I enjoy more each time I take it out--what a blast! My wife and I also ride a Greenspeed
    tandem. We've done tours up to 500 miles and look forward to more. From being just an occasional
    rider, I've now racked up thousands of miles on recumbents. My wedgie friends think I'm a little
    nuts, but they're just stuck in the "Matrix" and don't yet know the way, the truth, and the light.

    Recumbents--The "crack cocaine" of cycles

    Scott
     
  10. > A cup of tea contains about half the amount of a cup of coffee I found out
    on the web.
    > If I don't drink any in the morning I'm sleepy all day and get a headache. So yes, I'm hooked. Not
    > licking the frame of the VK tho. Epoxy is bad for
    you, m'kay?
    >
    > Mikael

    how 'bout that- another who gets a headache when he doesn't get his 'tay'

    Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!

    my nominations:

    Ty Phoo Barry's of Cork 'Gold Blend'

    rich, sucking on a cup of Tetly as he writes
     
  11. "rich westerman" skrev...

    > Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!
    >
    > my nominations:
    >
    > Ty Phoo Barry's of Cork 'Gold Blend'

    Dunno about whats best. I have begun buying it here though: http://www.perchs-the.dk/uk-menu.htm and
    I'm very happy with the cinnamon tea I bought. No fake aroma here. You can see the bits of cinnamon
    in it. Stank the place up pretty good when I brought it home. ;-)

    These are the people that refer to teabags as "dead mice" btw. It tastes the same and the tail goes
    over the edge of the cup.

    M.
     
  12. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 22:08:39 -0700, "William Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just curious as to what got you into riding.

    I was a cyclist for most of my youth, and gave up really when I went to University. I got the bike
    out again after I'd started a fairly rigorous fitness programme designed to turn me from fatbastard
    to fitbastard. The fitess programme worked (1.5-2 hours in the gym every day for three months, lost
    30lb and have never put it back on).

    I got the old bike out and decided to try cycling to work because working out in the gym is boring.
    It was quicker! So I decided that I was a cyclist and that was that: every office day since, summer
    or winter, rain or shine I've ridden the 15 miles round trip. Or sometimes 40+ miles if I take the
    long way home. How many cagers drive 30 miles out of their way just for the hell of it?

    I sold the second car and bought a 'bent in September 2002 for the smile factor and because I was
    fed up with pushing the prevailing wind home. Much more fun :) We also bought a triplet for my wife
    ot take the oys to school. We are cyclists!

    Guy
    ===
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  13. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 17:46:51 GMT, "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!

    Twinings. Or possibly Jacksons of Piccadilly. But my favourite is Twinings Earl Grey :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
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    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  14. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 17:46:51 GMT, "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!
    >
    >my nominations:
    >
    >Ty Phoo Barry's of Cork 'Gold Blend'

    -- Dead mice (tea bags)? %^P

    The champagne of teas, Darjeeling, is the "best". %^)

    Single-estate, loose leaf, no blends! Gopaldhara, Makaibari, Singbulli,... silver tip, first
    flush, second flush, autumnal,... Made with fresh spring water at just the right temperature and
    steeping time.

    The Earl can keep his bergamot oil to himself! Piccard obviously had no taste buds left after all
    that warp-speed travel.

    Jon Meinecke
     
  15. R.White

    R.White Guest

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Torben Scheel" skrev
    >
    > > And none of them even contain (very much) caffeine ?!? (I'm not entirely sure about that secret
    > > polish recipe, though ;-)
    >
    > A cup of tea contains about half the amount of a cup of coffee I found out on the web. If I don't
    > drink any in the morning I'm sleepy all day and get a headache. So yes, I'm hooked. Not licking
    > the frame of the VK tho. Epoxy is bad for >you, m'kay?

    Don't know if this is one place you looked, but it tells, among other things, how to reduce the
    amount of caffiene in iced tea brewed at home.

    http://www.chinamist.com/knowledge/health/caffeine/
     
  16. >> Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!
    >>
    Don't know about best, but this is what I drink:

    -"Sea Dyke" brand Funyan Oolong -Twinings Lapsang Souchong in tea bags (one of the few teas that
    don't turn bitter in a Thermos). -Other teas from Funyan province. Certainly nothing out of India or
    *shudder* Sri Lanka!!

    >These are the people that refer to teabags as "dead mice" btw. It tastes the same and the tail goes
    >over the edge of the cup.
    >
    I'd rather make a Thermos full of proper tea out of teabags than be dependent on some people's idea
    of tea: lukewarm water, 20 kind of fruit "teas" and one kind of cut-price Ceylon, and VERY small
    cups. Or the English version: a mugfull of overstrong tea smothered in milk. No wonder there are so
    many coffee drinkers: they never tasted a proper cup of tea. I do sometimes drink coffee btw: after
    a full-blown dinner, before the whiskey and cigar :) Of the three, the coffee is clearly the
    hardest drug...

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
  17. "Mark van Gorkom"

    > I do sometimes drink coffee btw: after a full-blown dinner, before the whiskey and cigar :) Of
    > the three, the coffee is clearly the hardest drug...

    I wouldn't know. Only time I drank coffee they took out my very inflamed appendix 3 days later. Not
    saying its connected but seems a bit suspicious. ;) Can't repeat the experiment for obvious reasons.

    M.
     
  18. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 18:41:16 GMT, Jon Meinecke <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The Earl can keep his bergamot oil to himself! Piccard obviously had no taste buds left after all
    >that warp-speed travel.

    Ah, maybe you've been drinking it wrong. No milk, perhaps a slice of lemon. Delicious!

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  19. Bentheadswb

    Bentheadswb Guest

    I ride, Started 33 years ago when I was 5, got the hang of it and off I went. This lead to fixing
    them for myself and my buddies. Started building custom bikes (choppers and snow bikes) then I
    turned 10 and went with a used 1972 CCM Silver Ghost (racing 10-speed) Built up a 5-speed "paperboy
    bike" with ballon tires when I was 13. A 5-speed that is for dirt? Insane! :eek:) Rode the rest of the
    way through high school in Chicago on a Raleigh. Built a "all-terrain bike" in 84 but it died when
    the pieces flew out of the truck in an accident. Took 3.5 years off and bought a 1988 Specialized
    Rockhopper Competition. Fitted it with slicks and was off in the backroads in Alabama. Took it with
    me in 89 to Italy, what a great place to ride! In 91, went to Arkansas with the MTB... not the best
    place to ride as I was chased by pickup trucks. The drive died in 92 as I got married, had kids and
    slipped into the grind. 1998 late fall, arrived in Texas and dusted off the MTB and did a tune-up.
    The wind was kicking like it does in N TX and my butt was killing me! Did a search on "bicycle seat
    pain" looking for a new seat and fell upon a recumbent page. :eek:) Did research on what I wanted (SWB)
    and what I would use it for (everything including off-road) and went with the last Nils Palm Wind 63
    in the country. (Think HPVelotechnik Street Machine with a 700C rear wheel and a Sachs 3x7 with a
    triple) February, 1999 was a great experience! Wow! I was comfortable, cut through the wind better
    and was dog slow! Yeah, I was getting my butt kicked by my buddies but I was getting faster! The
    miles rolled by and I started to change some components to suit me. Did the 100K Hotter than Hell
    100 in August 1999 and felt tired, hot but no pain at the finish. The spring of 2000 was a downer,
    my heart rate was moving up, I was losing weight and slowing down at the same time. Did very little
    riding as my heart rate would hit 170+ when I rode at a good clip. It kept getting worse through out
    the spring and by summer, I was off the bent. Early summer hit and the doc told me I had
    "hyperthyroidism" and required radiation to prevent death. No more bent riding, no more anything for
    the rest of the year. That was when I met Derek on this NG (the guy on the BansheeE and now, the
    Burley Rhino) He told me what was going to happen, what it would do to me and kept tabs through my
    obsessively long emails about gearing charts and the like. Spring, 2001...the doc told me to start
    riding again and the feeling was back. I was free again to get a few miles in as long as the heart
    rate monitor was low. Started to build up a little and shipped out to South Korea. The bent arrived
    in late August for some bizarre cycling conditions. Thank God I put kevlar tires on it and had full
    suspension. The weather turned cold by late September and my cycling tapered off. Winter 2001-2002,
    rode the Nils in the snow (not a great idea) and grabbed rides on occasion until April, the season
    was on! Rode the Nils off-road, on-road and over potholes and basically beat the hell out of it.
    Changed over to a 24-speed megarange and ditched the 3x7. Crashed too many times but had a lot of
    fun. Summer 2002, put the Nils in a crate and headed back to N TX. It arrived a week before the
    Hotter than Hell 100 and had to do the 50 miler. Derek was coming down with the BansheeE and I had
    to see who this person was that shared the hyper/hypothyroidism concept. Rode in 105F heat and wind
    with Derek and loved it. The heat killed me (Korea is 20F cooler) I made it with leg cramps at the
    end. Rode my second recumbent ever (BikeE) and Derek rode the Nils Palm SWB. I guess he liked it, he
    bought a Burley Canto (with a lot of performance parts) for this season. Just started to get some
    good riding time in and flew off to Turkey/Germany/Iraq for a few months. Now I am back, the Nils is
    running smooth with a new ISIS crank and half-step gearing. Derek has convinced me to tour later
    this year (that is what the bent was made for) We will do the HH100
    (100K) in August and I am about to buy some panniers. It is strange to look back at your life on a
    bicycle. I would say the best times of my life were on a bicycle, the recumbent is part of
    the process. 20" choppers to racing bikes/BMX/ATB/MTB and recumbents. I see the fire of
    cycling in the eyes of my younger son, he wants a bent...wants it bad! Next spring he will
    get his wish, a Tailwind that the entire family can ride. After all, the wisdom of the father
    should be passed down to his offspring. When he gets tall enough to ride the Nils, I will
    need to buy a Wishbone so I could ride again. That will be a few years away, the Nils is mine
    for now. Time to go touring and ride across Oklahoma with Derek next year.

    John H N TX
     
  20. On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 17:46:51 GMT, "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ok, lets start the 'best tea in the world' thread and get it out of our system!

    Keemun.

    No milk or sugar.
     
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