Why riding bikes is a better way to lose weight than jogging.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rush, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. Rush

    Rush Guest

    The science of fat metabolism. why biking burns fat better than
    jogging.
    Fat burning occurs when you are at 65 percent heart rate. 85% is
    cardio training, and your body cannot metabolize fat at a fast enough
    rate to supply energy at this level of exertion, it therefor
    metabolized carbohydrate and not fat, uses up glycogen stores in the
    liver. This results in an increase in appetite for carbohydrates to
    restore glycogen stores, and in the meanwhile, not as much fat is
    lost. Of course, running uses more energy per hour, but it is much
    easier I think to ride your bike for an hour than to jog for 1/2 hour,
    and you will burn as much calories on a hard bike ride as jogging
    lazily. YOu burn half the calories as jogging if you are just riding
    very comfortably, at 13 mph, which is barely making an effort, that's
    just relaxing, cruising speed.

    I post this because I believe the more people who take up biking,
    the more support will gather for designing communities that take into
    account bike accessability. We have these suburban labyrinths and
    there's no connecting paths from one section to the other, you'd have
    to either go through someone's yard, or go 3 miles around out the
    suburb and come back in, to get to a point 50 yards away. People
    usually have dogs, or fences, or you just don't feel comfortable
    cutting through someone's yard. I don't see why there is no
    consideration for pedestrians who want to walk from point a to b, or
    bike from point a to b, in a efficient manner, and not have to follow
    a maze of roads for 6 miles to get to a point 30 yards away.
     
    Tags:


  2. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Rush wrote:
    > The science of fat metabolism. why biking burns fat better than
    > jogging.
    > Fat burning occurs when you are at 65 percent heart rate. 85% is
    > cardio training, and your body cannot metabolize fat at a fast enough
    > rate to supply energy at this level of exertion, it therefor
    > metabolized carbohydrate and not fat, uses up glycogen stores in the
    > liver. This results in an increase in appetite for carbohydrates to
    > restore glycogen stores, and in the meanwhile, not as much fat is
    > lost. Of course, running uses more energy per hour, but it is much
    > easier I think to ride your bike for an hour than to jog for 1/2 hour,
    > and you will burn as much calories on a hard bike ride as jogging
    > lazily. YOu burn half the calories as jogging if you are just riding
    > very comfortably, at 13 mph, which is barely making an effort, that's
    > just relaxing, cruising speed.
    >
    > I post this because I believe the more people who take up biking,
    > the more support will gather for designing communities that take into
    > account bike accessability. We have these suburban labyrinths and
    > there's no connecting paths from one section to the other, you'd have
    > to either go through someone's yard, or go 3 miles around out the
    > suburb and come back in, to get to a point 50 yards away. People
    > usually have dogs, or fences, or you just don't feel comfortable
    > cutting through someone's yard. I don't see why there is no
    > consideration for pedestrians who want to walk from point a to b, or
    > bike from point a to b, in a efficient manner, and not have to follow
    > a maze of roads for 6 miles to get to a point 30 yards away.


    Laudable cause, but entirely false premise.

    Bill "running burns WAY more" S.
     
  3. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    OTOH, weight bearing exercises like jogging help prevent bone loss, while
    cycling does not.

    Now the $60K question: Why does it have to be bike riding vs. jogging?

    Getting more folks to be more active in *any* manner would pay a myriad of
    dividends.


    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  4. Mark Weaver

    Mark Weaver Guest

    For me, biking is the better way because when I run consistently, sooner or
    later I get some nagging injury that forces me to take time off (sore knee,
    sore hip, something). But that never happens with biking. The only real
    limit on my biking is time. I am conscious, though, that riding isn't
    weight bearing excercize, so I do mix in at least some activity that
    involves running (softball, basketball, the occasion 2-3 mile run).

    But, unfortunately, as the weather gets colder and wetter, I'll be running
    more and biking less. I just can't make myself do any significant distance
    on a exercize bike or trainer--yuck.

    Mark
     
  5. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Rush wrote:
    :: The science of fat metabolism. why biking burns fat better than
    :: jogging.
    :: Fat burning occurs when you are at 65 percent heart rate.

    Not true!

    85% is
    :: cardio training, and your body cannot metabolize fat at a fast enough
    :: rate to supply energy at this level of exertion, it therefor
    :: metabolized carbohydrate and not fat, uses up glycogen stores in the
    :: liver. This results in an increase in appetite for carbohydrates to
    :: restore glycogen stores, and in the meanwhile, not as much fat is
    :: lost.

    :: Of course, running uses more energy per hour,

    Why?

    but it is much
    :: easier I think to ride your bike for an hour than to jog for 1/2
    :: hour,

    That depends.

    and you will burn as much calories on a hard bike ride as
    :: jogging lazily.

    YOu burn half the calories as jogging if you are
    :: just riding very comfortably, at 13 mph, which is barely making an
    :: effort, that's just relaxing, cruising speed.

    Says who?

    ::
    :: I post this because I believe the more people who take up biking,
    :: the more support will gather for designing communities that take into
    :: account bike accessability.

    I support that, but running is good too.

    We have these suburban labyrinths and
    :: there's no connecting paths from one section to the other, you'd have
    :: to either go through someone's yard, or go 3 miles around out the
    :: suburb and come back in, to get to a point 50 yards away. People
    :: usually have dogs, or fences, or you just don't feel comfortable
    :: cutting through someone's yard. I don't see why there is no
    :: consideration for pedestrians who want to walk from point a to b, or
    :: bike from point a to b, in a efficient manner, and not have to follow
    :: a maze of roads for 6 miles to get to a point 30 yards away.

    You can do better than that, can't you?
     
  6. Rush wrote:
    > The science of fat metabolism. why biking burns fat better than
    > jogging.
    > Fat burning occurs when you are at 65 percent heart rate. 85% is
    > cardio training, and your body cannot metabolize fat at a fast enough
    > rate to supply energy at this level of exertion, it therefor
    > metabolized carbohydrate and not fat, uses up glycogen stores in the
    > liver. This results in an increase in appetite for carbohydrates to
    > restore glycogen stores, and in the meanwhile, not as much fat is
    > lost. Of course, running uses more energy per hour, but it is much
    > easier I think to ride your bike for an hour than to jog for 1/2 hour,
    > and you will burn as much calories on a hard bike ride as jogging
    > lazily. YOu burn half the calories as jogging if you are just riding
    > very comfortably, at 13 mph, which is barely making an effort, that's
    > just relaxing, cruising speed.
    >
    > I post this because I believe the more people who take up biking,
    > the more support will gather for designing communities that take into
    > account bike accessability. We have these suburban labyrinths and
    > there's no connecting paths from one section to the other, you'd have
    > to either go through someone's yard, or go 3 miles around out the
    > suburb and come back in, to get to a point 50 yards away. People
    > usually have dogs, or fences, or you just don't feel comfortable
    > cutting through someone's yard. I don't see why there is no
    > consideration for pedestrians who want to walk from point a to b, or
    > bike from point a to b, in a efficient manner, and not have to follow
    > a maze of roads for 6 miles to get to a point 30 yards away.


    Mmm, I give it a C-.

    -km

    --
    Only cowards fight kids -- unidentified Moscow protester

    http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
    proud to be owned by a yorkie
     
  7. C A III A

    C A III A Guest

    Jogging has more negative effects in the long run as compared to cycling.
    More pressure on the joints where the impact as 2+ times your weight. In
    cycling the major consideration is the knees and even they get less strain
    than joggers'.
    As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    osteoporosis (mainly in women) due to defense mechanisms and adaptation. In
    cycling I do not know for sure, but should not have such a profound effect.


    "Chris Neary" <[email protected] > wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OTOH, weight bearing exercises like jogging help prevent bone loss, while
    > cycling does not.
    >
    > Now the $60K question: Why does it have to be bike riding vs. jogging?
    >
    > Getting more folks to be more active in *any* manner would pay a myriad of
    > dividends.
    >
    >
    > Chris Neary
    > [email protected]
    >
    > "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    > you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    > loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  8. HardwareLust

    HardwareLust Guest

    Rush wrote:
    > People
    > usually have dogs, or fences, or you just don't feel comfortable
    > cutting through someone's yard.


    Don't feel comfortable tresspassing on someone else's property? I certainly
    would hope so, but that's not a terribly realistic statement.

    Having purchased a very nice new home on a 'corner lot' two years ago, I
    have come to the realization that unless (or until) I install a chain link
    fence topped with razor wire, sirens, and searchlights, that every punk kid
    under the age of 40 cuts through my yard, on a variety of 2, 3 and 4 wheel
    devices, both powered and unpowered, on a daily basis. There is a complete
    and utter lack of respect for other people's property in this backwards ass
    hick town I live in.

    Apparently enough, there are damn few people who "don't feel comfortable
    cutting through someone's yard". I wish I had dogs again. When I had my
    Great Danes (2 big ol' brindles...they are a joy!) sleeping on my porch, no
    one came within 50 yards of my house without getting a stern warning from
    one or the other. 120+ pounds of mean-ass snarling dog tends to instill
    respect in the otherwise lawless populace.

    Mebbe it's time to get some new doggies. I think that's a fine idea.

    Regards,
    H.
     
  9. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >osteoporosis (mainly in women) due to defense mechanisms and adaptation. In
    >cycling I do not know for sure, but should not have such a profound effect.


    I beg to differ.

    A couple of references:
    http://www.bicycling.com/qanda/0,3257,s1-89,00.html?category_id=363&article_type_id='qa'

    and:

    http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20041014.html




    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  10. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >ubject: Re: Why riding bikes is a better way to lose weight than jogging.
    >From: "Mark Weaver" [email protected]
    >Date: 10/15/2004 6:08


    >because when I run consistently, sooner or
    >later I get some nagging injury that forces me to take time off (sore knee,
    >sore hip, something). But that never happens with biking.


    You're not riding hard enough ;-)
     
  11. C A III A

    C A III A Guest

    My point is that women (aftermenapausal) will lose more bone if they were an
    ex-jogger. Cycling in general would cause less bone growth. But if compared
    to an ex-jogger, ex-cyclist will lose less bone. The percentage loss will be
    more of a problem, since body will not know what is going on and will more
    likely to be damaged.

    "Chris Neary" <[email protected] > wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >>As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >>osteoporosis (mainly in women) due to defense mechanisms and adaptation.
    >>In
    >>cycling I do not know for sure, but should not have such a profound
    >>effect.

    >
    > I beg to differ.
    >
    > A couple of references:
    > http://www.bicycling.com/qanda/0,3257,s1-89,00.html?category_id=363&article_type_id='qa'
    >
    > and:
    >
    > http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20041014.html
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Chris Neary
    > [email protected]
    >
    > "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    > you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    > loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  12. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "HardwareLust" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Having purchased a very nice new home on a 'corner lot' two years ago, I
    > have come to the realization that unless (or until) I install a chain link
    > fence topped with razor wire, sirens, and searchlights, that every punk

    kid
    > under the age of 40 cuts through my yard, on a variety of 2, 3 and 4 wheel
    > devices, both powered and unpowered, on a daily basis. There is a

    complete
    > and utter lack of respect for other people's property in this backwards

    ass
    > hick town I live in.
    >
    > Apparently enough, there are damn few people who "don't feel comfortable
    > cutting through someone's yard". I wish I had dogs again. ... 120+

    pounds of mean-ass snarling dog tends to instill
    > respect in the otherwise lawless populace.
    >
    > Mebbe it's time to get some new doggies. I think that's a fine idea.


    Free advice: you would probably be happier if you didn't live on a corner
    lot..
     
  13. My Very Self

    My Very Self Guest


    >
    >Laudable cause, but entirely false premise.
    >
    >Bill "running burns WAY more" S.
    >

    Probably true, but the the effective reality is that you cannot get me
    off my bike, but will not get me to jog.
     
  14. matty j

    matty j Guest

    i think most of us who are very active find that all this exercise
    stuff helps us maintain our weight but without a cut in calories not
    much weight loss.i think we all tend to just eat more the more active
    we are.i think we can eat more and not gain weight but the jury is
    still out on the weight loss part..again this is without some sort of
    calorie restriction in your exercise plan.
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Rush) writes:

    > I post this because I believe the more people who take up biking,
    > the more support will gather for designing communities that take into
    > account bike accessability.


    The health/fitness line is only one of several that can be used
    to promote cycling. There's also money and time savings, although
    a lot of people seem to be more reluctant to confess they cycle
    for economy, than for fitness. And then there's the environmental
    thing, less stress/more convenience than driving, and the best one
    of all -- riding is simply a pleasure.

    As for "designing communities that take into account bike
    accessability": pedestrian accessibility (including accessibility
    for physically disabled people) goes hand-in-hand with that.
    Areas that are more pedestrian accessible tend to also be more
    bike accessible, and vice versa. So really, if one is to be
    promoted, so should the other. That way you can get more people
    on-side -- people who might not necessarily want to ride from A
    to B, but wouldn't mind being able to walk from A to B.

    > We have these suburban labyrinths and
    > there's no connecting paths from one section to the other, you'd have
    > to either go through someone's yard, or go 3 miles around out the
    > suburb and come back in, to get to a point 50 yards away.


    Maybe what's really needed is to get real estate developers
    hooked on riding. Or persuade them that developments with
    human-powered transportation facilities would be more lucrative
    for them than the usual cul-de-sac hell. But I think that
    endeavour wouldn't even have a snowball's hope in a urinal;
    those developers want to keep it 'affordable' for the buyers
    while maximizing their own returns. They do that by avoiding
    facilities, not by putting them in.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  16. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >Maybe what's really needed is to get real estate developers
    >hooked on riding. Or persuade them that developments with
    >human-powered transportation facilities would be more lucrative
    >for them than the usual cul-de-sac hell. But I think that
    >endeavour wouldn't even have a snowball's hope in a urinal;
    >those developers want to keep it 'affordable' for the buyers
    >while maximizing their own returns. They do that by avoiding
    >facilities, not by putting them in.


    The SF Bay Area is finally grasping the fact that the $$$'s don't exist for
    all the road infrastructure necessary for the typical housing developments,
    so a number of cities of buying into the concept of "Transit Villages",
    which higher density developments built around BART stations and similar
    locations. Such developments are inherently walking and cycling friendly.


    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  17. Rush <[email protected]> wrote:
    >The science of fat metabolism. why biking burns fat better than
    >jogging.
    > Fat burning occurs when you are at 65 percent heart rate. 85% is


    Fat burning peaks around 50-85% MRH (pretty big range, isn't it?).

    Above that range, you may find a range where you actually
    burn less fat as you go up in total calorie expenditure,
    but eventually the calorie expenditure will increase so
    high that even the inefficient fat burning uses more fat
    than your 50-85% peak.

    But you don't want to ride for an hour at those exertion
    levels. It's a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic (no course
    is perfectly flat) activity that slowly saps your carbo
    stores and your will to exercise just for fun and fitness.

    So yes. 50-65% MRH (or about 50% VO2max) is a very good
    and relaxing place to be if you are exercising to reduce
    your fat without the pain that high carbohydrate-burning
    activity can cause.

    And if it's comfortable, you may ride for an hour instead
    of half an hour, and that will certainly improve your
    calorie output.

    --Blair
    "If you aren't breathing hard you're
    going too slow; but if you can't carry
    on a conversation, you're going too fast."
     
  18. Chris Neary <[email protected] > wrote:
    >OTOH, weight bearing exercises like jogging help prevent bone loss, while
    >cycling does not.


    What kind of swimming pool do you cycle in?

    --Blair
    "My bones hurt."
     
  19. Chris Neary <[email protected] > wrote:
    >>As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >>As far as bone loss. After quitting jogging there are more chances of
    >>osteoporosis (mainly in women) due to defense mechanisms and adaptation. In
    >>cycling I do not know for sure, but should not have such a profound effect.

    >
    >I beg to differ.
    >
    >A couple of references:
    >http://www.bicycling.com/qanda/0,3257,s1-89,00.html?category_id=363&article_type_id='qa'


    Password protected binary text...

    >and:
    >
    >http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20041014.html


    Says nothing about cycling.

    --Blair
    "Differ better."
     
  20. Fx199 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>ubject: Re: Why riding bikes is a better way to lose weight than jogging.
    >>From: "Mark Weaver" [email protected]
    >>Date: 10/15/2004 6:08

    >
    >>because when I run consistently, sooner or
    >>later I get some nagging injury that forces me to take time off (sore knee,
    >>sore hip, something). But that never happens with biking.

    >
    >You're not riding hard enough ;-)


    Riding can only increase the stress on your skeleton compared
    with sitting in the drive-thru at McDonald's.

    And not so much that you end up getting artificial parts
    when you get older.

    --Blair
    "I suspect we've been invaded by
    orthopedic surgeons who want
    nicer bikes..."
     
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