Wide 27 Inch Tires?



T

Tom Asher

Guest
I cannot seem to find anything wider than 27 X 1 3/8. I've looked (and
googled - are they synonyms now?) quite a bit, but I cannot find anything.
 
P

papercut

Guest
Tom Asher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I cannot seem to find anything wider than 27 X 1 3/8. I've looked (and
> googled - are they synonyms now?) quite a bit, but I cannot find anything.


Wider than that size is non-existent.

Even 27 X 1 3/8 are getting almost impossible to find.
sheldonbrown.com still carries some in both road and off-road
varieties. Also, http://biketoolsetc.com/ had some less expensive IRC
road versions.

I managed to get my hands on a few sets from a old stock dump, with
the brand name scratched off. They've got a slightly off-road-ish
tread pattern. Have yet to try them.
 
T

Tom Reingold

Guest
papercut wrote:
> Tom Asher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
>
>>I cannot seem to find anything wider than 27 X 1 3/8. I've looked (and
>>googled - are they synonyms now?) quite a bit, but I cannot find anything.

>
>
> Wider than that size is non-existent.
>
> Even 27 X 1 3/8 are getting almost impossible to find.
> sheldonbrown.com still carries some in both road and off-road
> varieties. Also, http://biketoolsetc.com/ had some less expensive IRC
> road versions.
>
> I managed to get my hands on a few sets from a old stock dump, with
> the brand name scratched off. They've got a slightly off-road-ish
> tread pattern. Have yet to try them.



I was a bike mechanic from 1978 to 1984. As far as I know, wider tires
never existed for 27" (really 630 mm) diameter.


--
Tom Reingold
Noo Joizy
 
J

Jeff Wills

Guest
Tom Asher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I cannot seem to find anything wider than 27 X 1 3/8. I've looked (and
> googled - are they synonyms now?) quite a bit, but I cannot find anything.


As Papercut said, they don't exist. I've been in and around the
bicycle business for 25 years (eeek!) and I've never heard of anything
wider than 1 3/8" in a 27 inch tire.

If you truly have your heart set on wider tires, you could convert to
700C rims and then you could find 2" wide tires (and beyond). But then
you'll have to worry about brake reach and frame clearance. At that
point it becomes easier to buy a modern hybrid bike.

Jeff
 
B

Blair P. Houghton

Guest
Tom Reingold <[email protected]> wrote:
>I was a bike mechanic from 1978 to 1984. As far as I know, wider tires
>never existed for 27" (really 630 mm) diameter.


N.B.: 630 mm (24.8 inches) is the diameter at the bead seat.

Add double the tire diameter (1-1/8 inches or 28.6 mm)
and you get... 687.2 mm or 27.05 inches.

Close enough for pack riding.

--Blair
"Then you sit on it and realize
your computer's miscalibrated..."
 
T

Tom Reingold

Guest
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Tom Reingold <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>I was a bike mechanic from 1978 to 1984. As far as I know, wider tires
>>never existed for 27" (really 630 mm) diameter.

>
>
> N.B.: 630 mm (24.8 inches) is the diameter at the bead seat.
>
> Add double the tire diameter (1-1/8 inches or 28.6 mm)
> and you get... 687.2 mm or 27.05 inches.
>
> Close enough for pack riding.



Ah, thanks for the extra information. Also, I believe the width rating
is not the width measurement when the tire is inflated. It is the
measurement of bead-to-bead distance when you flatten the tire on a
tabletop, divided by 2.5. At least that is what my memory says, from
back in those days. In practice, the width rating is often the same as
the width, but sometimes not.

Tom
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
Tom Asher wrote:

> I cannot seem to find anything wider than 27 X 1 3/8. I've looked (and
> googled - are they synonyms now?) quite a bit, but I cannot find anything.

That's right, 1-3/8 is the 'revisionist' extra wide version
for the K2 rim. In ISO it's supposed to stop at 1-1/4.

Brands vary widely. Michelin World Tour 1-3/8 is a few MM
wider than a Tiogo 1-3/8 f'rinstance.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971