Wider wheels on Cannondale touring bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Viktor, Jan 29, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Viktor

    Viktor Guest

    I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame, something that is not so easy to find
    anymore. Just my luck, I permanently trashed my knee soon after I bought the bike (not on the bike,
    though). So, I am a definite Sunday rider now. I've never been lightweight, as I'm over 200 lbs
    (not fat at all), and those skinny tires & wheels are just too much for me now (or I should say,
    just too little for me now). So I want to get a set of thicker tires & wheels. I must admit, I also
    would like to take it on dirt roads (NOT mountain biking trails, just dirt roads). So, admitting
    that I am not a bike techie, how difficult will it be to install wider tires & wheels on the bike?
    It came with Deore LX components. Looking at the brakes, it seems that I will have to buy entire
    brake shoe/caliper units to allow for the wider wheels. Can I just go into the bike shop and have
    them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two shoe/caliper units? Feel free to give general or
    specific advice.

    Viktor
     
    Tags:


  2. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    If it was really built as a touring bike, you should be able to fit tyres up to 700x35 at least
    without changing anything other than the tyre and tube. We've toured many tens of thousands of
    kilometres on a tandem equipped with that size of tyre, and the two of us together outweigh you by
    about 60 or 70 pounds, plus we've carried up to 100lbs of luggage as well when cycle camping.

    The only time we've ever had problems with the tyres has been on very rough dirt roads with that
    100lbs of luggage on board. The sort of road where you find signs apologising for its state: "Worst
    main road in NSW" (council sign on the road between Murwillumbah and Nimbin); "Due to inadequate
    government funding we are unable to maintain this road" (council sign on the road from Crookwell
    into the Wombwyan Caves)...

    Nick

    "Viktor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame, something that is not so easy to find
    > anymore. Just my luck, I permanently trashed my knee soon after I bought the bike (not on the
    > bike, though). So, I am a definite Sunday rider now. I've never been lightweight, as I'm over 200
    > lbs (not fat at all), and those skinny tires & wheels are just too much for me now (or I should
    > say, just too little for me now). So I want to get a set of thicker tires & wheels. I must admit,
    > I also would like to take it on dirt roads (NOT mountain biking trails, just dirt roads). So,
    > admitting that I am not a bike techie, how difficult will it be to install wider tires & wheels on
    > the bike? It came with Deore LX components. Looking at the brakes, it seems that I will have to
    > buy entire brake shoe/caliper units to allow for the wider wheels. Can I just go into the bike
    > shop and have them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two shoe/caliper units? Feel free to
    > give general or specific advice.
     
  3. Viktor wrote:
    > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame,

    I think you mean "which has 27" wheels".

    I have the same bike as my touring bike. (http://freeengineer.org/thetouringbike.html) I use 27 x 1
    1/4 Conti Top Touring 2000's which are still made and available, and I cruise dirt roads and even
    some trails without problem.

    I remember there once were 27 x 1 3/8 tires, and I think that is the widest it will theoretically
    take. As to where you can find such a tire? I haven't seen any for awhile.

    At one time I looked at converting to 700c but concluded it wasn't going to be possible because
    of the cantilever brake boss locations. New brakes of some unknown miracle brand would be
    required at least.

    Conti's are sweet and cheap 27 inch tires are still available at most any wal-mart and the like and
    thats a good thing for when you are on tour.

    If your original wheelset was anywhere as badly put together as mine were, that is going to be the
    weakness as far as dirt roads. The first washboard section you hit without slowing down and they
    could fold. Make sure your wheels are true and the spokes tight and you should be good.

    CRM


    > something that is not so easy to find anymore. Just my luck, I permanently trashed my knee soon
    > after I bought the bike (not on the bike, though). So, I am a definite Sunday rider now. I've
    > never been lightweight, as I'm over 200 lbs (not fat at all), and those skinny tires & wheels are
    > just too much for me now (or I should say, just too little for me now). So I want to get a set of
    > thicker tires & wheels. I must admit, I also would like to take it on dirt roads (NOT mountain
    > biking trails, just dirt roads). So, admitting that I am not a bike techie, how difficult will it
    > be to install wider tires & wheels on the bike? It came with Deore LX components. Looking at the
    > brakes, it seems that I will have to buy entire brake shoe/caliper units to allow for the wider
    > wheels. Can I just go into the bike shop and have them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two
    > shoe/caliper units? Feel free to give general or specific advice.
    >
    > Viktor
     
  4. Thomast41

    Thomast41 Guest

    Viktor I am a little confused. I can not see how different brakes will increase clearance for bigger
    tires. The mounting point of the brakes cannot be changed so a longer brake will make the pads miss
    the rim. Sounds like you are looking for comfort. Have the bike shop put on the largest tire that
    will fit in the frame. You should be able to fit at least 32's

    Most wheel sets are 3cross spoke pattern. 4 cross use to be alot more common. The fourcross spoked
    wheels are generally more shock absorbing that the 3 cross. Use the best quality butted spokes you
    can afford and have someone with a good reputation for wheel building do you a set.

    Tom @TET Cycles
     
  5. Harris Cyclery has 27x1 3/8" Tioga Bloodhound tires for $19.95. This is likely the widest size that
    your bike would accept and if your wheels are still OK this is a much cheaper way to go. These tires
    are described as having an aggressive knobby tread which sounds like it would be suitable for dirt
    trails. You can check this out at: (http://www.sheldonbrown/harris/tires/630.html)

    Bob Taylor
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame, something that is not so easy to find
    >anymore. Just my luck, I permanently trashed my knee soon after I bought the bike (not on the bike,
    >though). So, I am a definite Sunday rider now. I've never been lightweight, as I'm over 200 lbs
    >(not fat at all), and those skinny tires & wheels are just too much for me now (or I should say,
    >just too little for me now). So I want to get a set of thicker tires & wheels. I must admit, I also
    >would like to take it on dirt roads (NOT mountain biking trails, just dirt roads). So, admitting
    >that I am not a bike techie, how difficult will it be to install wider tires & wheels on the bike?

    Wider tires is easy. I'm not sure why you want wider wheels. You can fit pretty wide tires on even
    narrow rims. I use to run 38C tires on a MA-2 rim.

    >It came with Deore LX components. Looking at the brakes, it seems that I will have to buy entire
    >brake shoe/caliper units to allow for the wider wheels. Can I just go into the bike shop and have
    >them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two shoe/caliper units? Feel free to give general or
    >specific advice.

    Just get the wider tires and re-user your old rims and brakes.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  7. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    cashrefundman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Viktor wrote:
    > > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame,
    >
    >
    > I think you mean "which has 27" wheels".

    It's a 27" frame, or 68.5 cm, which is why it's not replaceable. I have one too, which I treasure.

    The brake studs on mine are situated such as to work for either rim size.

    Chalo Colina
     
  8. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (ThomasT41) wrote:

    > I can not see how different brakes will increase clearance for bigger tires. The mounting point of
    > the brakes cannot be changed so a longer brake will make the pads miss the rim.

    If his frame is like mine, it's got cantilever brakes. Some earlier C'dale touring frames had
    standard reach calipers though.

    Chalo Colina
     
  9. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    "Viktor" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame, something that is not so easy to find
    > anymore.

    No kidding. I bought the last one they made when they stopped producing the size around 1991. It's
    been an excellent bike with tremendous durability under a lot of hard riding.

    > and those skinny tires & wheels are just too much for me now (or I should say, just too little for
    > me now). So I want to get a set of thicker tires & wheels.

    If your frame is like mine, and it has cantilever brakes (the kind that mount on 2 posts which stick
    out of the frame), then you can fit any 700x38c tire without problems. Some of them fit with enough
    clearance for fenders, though that does not sound like it is a big issue for you.

    Good 700x37 or 700x38 tires I have used include Continental Top Touring 2000, WTB Slickasaurus,
    Tioga City Slicker, Panaracer Commuter 737, and Kenda Kourier. Of these, Contis have the strongest
    casings, and WTBs are the fastest.

    > how difficult will it be to install wider tires & wheels on the bike?

    If you like your wheels and find them strong enough, you will not need to replace them. New tires
    alone will do the job.

    > LX components. Looking at the brakes, it seems that I will have to buy entire brake shoe/caliper
    > units to allow for the wider wheels.

    If you have cantilever brakes, they can be adjusted to clear any tire you use. If you have caliper
    brakes, they will dictate how fat a tire you can use before there is a clearance problem.

    > Can I just go into the bike shop and have them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two
    > shoe/caliper units?

    You can do the tire change yourself, but let the bike shop handle any work on the brakes. You may as
    well have them inspect the bike and do other adjustments as necessary.

    Chalo Colina
     
  10. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    On the off chance that your bike uses 27" wheels and tires, I recommend Michelin World Tour 27 x 1
    1/4" tires. They're significantly fatter than most tires in that size.

    Chalo Colina
     
  11. Viktor

    Viktor Guest

    > > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame,
    >
    > I think you mean "which has 27" wheels".

    I meant what I wrote, a 27" frame. And like most bikes, it uses 27" wheels. As I wrote, 27" frames
    are not common.

    Viktor
     
  12. Viktor

    Viktor Guest

    > > I bought a Cannondale touring bike in 1990 with a 27" frame, something that is not so easy to
    > > find anymore.
    >
    > No kidding. I bought the last one they made when they stopped producing the size around 1991. It's
    > been an excellent bike with tremendous durability under a lot of hard riding.

    That's good to know. I probably will never wear mine out then, assuming I don't crash. So, I think I
    got lucky, getting a 27" frame when I did.

    > > and those skinny tires & wheels are just too much for me now (or I should say, just too little
    > > for me now). So I want to get a set of thicker tires & wheels.
    >
    > If your frame is like mine, and it has cantilever brakes (the kind that mount on 2 posts which
    > stick out of the frame), then you can fit any 700x38c tire without problems. Some of them fit with
    > enough clearance for fenders, though that does not sound like it is a big issue for you.

    Yes, it does have cantilever brakes. I should have wrote that. I can use 700x38c tires? That'll
    probably work fine. I just want something that feels more stable. You're right, fenders probably
    aren't an issue, as I won't be riding in the rain or mud.

    > Good 700x37 or 700x38 tires I have used include Continental Top Touring 2000, WTB Slickasaurus,
    > Tioga City Slicker, Panaracer Commuter 737, and Kenda Kourier. Of these, Contis have the strongest
    > casings, and WTBs are the fastest.

    I'm too old to worry about being fast, but stronger casings are good.
    Mr. Tuffies (do they still exist?) inside are even better.

    > > Can I just go into the bike shop and have them install wider wheels, wider tires, and two
    > > shoe/caliper units?
    >
    > You can do the tire change yourself, but let the bike shop handle any work on the brakes. You may
    > as well have them inspect the bike and do other adjustments as necessary.

    You can rest assured that I will let the bike shop do the work. In my youth I would try to adjust
    brakes and chains, but the results were never as good as a professional's work

    Viktor
     
  13. Viktor

    Viktor Guest

    > On the off chance that your bike uses 27" wheels and tires, I recommend Michelin World Tour 27 x 1
    > 1/4" tires. They're significantly fatter than most tires in that size.

    Actually I just looked at the bike, and it uses 27" wheels and already has 1.25" tires on it. The
    wheels are the original Sun Mistral ones I bought with the bike.

    Okay, does someone want to list the standard widths of available wheels? Are there only two widths,
    racing/touring and mountain? I guess I assumed that there were a few different widths. What width do
    the (I don't know what they're called) half-mountain / half-touring bikes (combo?) use? Remember,
    unlike the majority of you here, I no longer care about going fast.

    It should be obvious that I am completely out of touch with modern bike technology. I haven't ridden
    in years. I will be able to test that old saying about never forgetting how to ride a bike.

    Viktor
     
  14. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Robert Taylor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Harris Cyclery has 27x1 3/8" Tioga Bloodhound tires for $19.95. This is likely the widest size
    > that your bike would accept and if your wheels are still OK this is a much cheaper way to go.
    > These tires are described as having an aggressive knobby tread which sounds like it would be
    > suitable for dirt trails. You can check this out at:
    > (http://www.sheldonbrown/harris/tires/630.html)

    The Michelin World Tour at the same price is as wide but not knobby.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "ThomasT41" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Viktor I am a little confused. I can not see how different brakes will increase clearance for
    > bigger tires. The mounting point of the brakes cannot be
    changed
    > so a longer brake will make the pads miss the rim. Sounds like you are looking for comfort. Have
    > the bike shop put on the
    largest
    > tire that will fit in the frame. You should be able to fit at least 32's
    >
    > Most wheel sets are 3cross spoke pattern. 4 cross use to be alot more
    common.
    > The fourcross spoked wheels are generally more shock absorbing that the 3 cross. Use the best
    > quality butted spokes you can afford and have someone
    with
    > a good reputation for wheel building do you a set.
    >
    > Tom @TET Cycles

    I bet you cannot feel the difference between a three cross wheel and a four cross wheel. If there is
    any "compliance" going on _within_ your wheel, the tension is inadequate.

    Among major brands of spoke there are not quality differences. I agree with using a major brand of
    good spoke but Wheelsmith/Asahi and DT and ACI and Union all are acceptably good. Nipples do vary
    but that aids or frustrates the builder without otherwise affecting the wheel's perfomance.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  16. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    Not an exhaustive listing of 27" tires, but very informative:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/tires/630.html

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL

    "Viktor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > On the off chance that your bike uses 27" wheels and tires, I recommend Michelin World Tour 27 x
    > > 1 1/4" tires. They're significantly fatter than most tires in that size.
    >
    > Actually I just looked at the bike, and it uses 27" wheels and already has 1.25" tires on it. The
    > wheels are the original Sun Mistral ones I bought with the bike.
    >
    > Okay, does someone want to list the standard widths of available wheels? Are there only two
    > widths, racing/touring and mountain? I guess I assumed that there were a few different widths.
    > What width do the (I don't know what they're called) half-mountain / half-touring bikes (combo?)
    > use? Remember, unlike the majority of you here, I no longer care about going fast.
    >
    > It should be obvious that I am completely out of touch with modern bike technology. I haven't
    > ridden in years. I will be able to test that old saying about never forgetting how to ride a bike.
    >
    > Viktor
     
  17. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Viktor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On the off chance that your bike uses 27" wheels and tires, I recommend Michelin World Tour 27 x
    > > 1 1/4" tires. They're significantly fatter than most tires in that size.
    >
    > Actually I just looked at the bike, and it uses 27" wheels and already has 1.25" tires on it. The
    > wheels are the original Sun Mistral ones I bought with the bike.
    >
    > Okay, does someone want to list the standard widths of available wheels? Are there only two
    > widths, racing/touring and mountain? I guess I assumed that there were a few different widths.
    > What width do the (I don't know what they're called) half-mountain / half-touring bikes (combo?)
    > use? Remember, unlike the majority of you here, I no longer care about going fast.
    >

    Like many things bicycle, there are no standards. There are loads of wheels that are nearly the same
    diameter yet are incompatible, 700C
    vs. 27" being the most asked about. The half 'n' half "hybrid" bikes use 700 x 38C tires usually-
    roughly 1/4" wider tires mounted on rims
    1/3" smaller in diameter than your current 27 x 1 1/4" wheels & tires.

    Much of the U.S. market has standardized around 700C ("road") rims and tires and 26" ("mountain")
    rims and tires in recent years. To make things more confusing, 700C tires are available in widths
    from 19mm to
    1i (1/4" to 2 1/2") while 26" tires are available in widths from skinny to gonzo (1" to 3").

    > It should be obvious that I am completely out of touch with modern bike technology. I haven't
    > ridden in years. I will be able to test that old saying about never forgetting how to ride a bike.
    >
    > Viktor

    If I were in your position, I'd just replace the tires that are on the bike, clean it up, and go for
    a ride. Life's too short to spend time worrying about your tires.

    Jeff
     
  18. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    I wrote:

    > > On the off chance that your bike uses 27" wheels and tires, I recommend Michelin World Tour 27 x
    > > 1 1/4" tires. They're significantly fatter than most tires in that size.

    "Viktor" replied:
    >
    > Actually I just looked at the bike, and it uses 27" wheels and already has 1.25" tires on it. The
    > wheels are the original Sun Mistral ones I bought with the bike.
    >
    > Okay, does someone want to list the standard widths of available wheels? Are there only two
    > widths, racing/touring and mountain? I guess I assumed that there were a few different widths.
    > What width do the (I don't know what they're called) half-mountain / half-touring bikes (combo?)
    > use? Remember, unlike the majority of you here, I no longer care about going fast.

    There are two sizes of wheels (that's the metal part) that will fit on your bike. One is called 27"
    and it has a 630mm dia. seat where the tire bead sits. The other is called 700c and it has a 622mm
    bead seat diameter. The two sizes of tires are functionally equivalent, but not interchangeable on
    each others' rims.

    27" rims are obsolescent, down but not yet out. They were that way even in 1990 when you bought your
    bike, but old marketplace habits still put them on some bikes in the touring category.

    You have said your bike uses 27 x 1 1/4" tires. That size is the widest of the 3 commonly remaining
    sizes for 27" rims. But not all 27 X 1 1/4" tires are the same size! I recommended Michelin World
    Tour tires because they are the fattest readily available tires I know for the 27" size. I think you
    will like them.

    If for whatever reason you choose to spend money repairing or upgrading your wheels, replace them
    with the 700c size. Your frame will accomodate them just fine, and you'll have a better selection of
    wider tires to choose from, like all those 700x38c tires I mentioned earlier.

    Good luck, and happy cycling.

    Chalo Colina
     
  19. Viktor

    Viktor Guest

    > There are two sizes of wheels (that's the metal part) that will fit on your bike. One is called
    > 27" and it has a 630mm dia. seat where the tire bead sits. The other is called 700c and it has a
    > 622mm bead seat diameter. The two sizes of tires are functionally equivalent, but not
    > interchangeable on each others' rims.
    >
    > 27" rims are obsolescent, down but not yet out. They were that way even in 1990 when you bought
    > your bike, but old marketplace habits still put them on some bikes in the touring category.

    Just call me Rip Van Winkle. :)

    > If for whatever reason you choose to spend money repairing or upgrading your wheels, replace them
    > with the 700c size. Your frame will accomodate them just fine, and you'll have a better selection
    > of wider tires to choose from, like all those 700x38c tires I mentioned earlier.

    More terminology! I would assume that the 'c' in 700x38c tires referred to centimeters, but that is
    not possible. 38c must refer to 38mm, so a 700x38c tire is just a hair under 1.5" wide, right? I
    really like this option. It'll cost me a few bucks for new wheels, but the thought of having another
    .25" in the width appeals to me.

    Viktor
     
  20. "Viktor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    |
    | More terminology! I would assume that the 'c' in 700x38c tires referred to centimeters, but that
    | is not possible. 38c must refer to 38mm, so a 700x38c tire is just a hair under 1.5" wide, right?
    | I really like this option. It'll cost me a few bucks for new wheels, but the thought of having
    | another .25" in the width appeals to me.
    |
    | Viktor
    |

    I have a similar type frame from a different manufacturer. I changed to 700C wheels a few years
    back. I now can ride 700X40 knobbies, 700X25 slicks, and anything in between. Very happy now!
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...