Widest rear tires on horizontal dropout road bikes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by meb, May 28, 2008.

  1. meb

    meb New Member

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    I was needing to get some new tires for some new wider wheelsets and replacements on worn tires and was wondering how wide of 700C tires would fit on 70s and 80s vintage road bikes having horizontal dropouts. i.e. 35 or 37 or 38 or 40.
     
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  2. On May 28, 7:02 pm, meb <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > I was needing to get some new tires for some new wider wheelsets and
    > replacements on worn tires and was wondering how wide of 700C tires
    > would fit on 70s and 80s vintage road bikes having horizontal dropouts.
    > i.e. 35 or 37 or 38 or 40.
    >
    > --
    > meb


    The only way to tell is to note your current tire size (and measure it
    as sizes can be misleading), and note the clearance at various places
    and adjust from there.

    Joseph
     
  3. Hank

    Hank Guest

    On May 28, 10:02 am, meb <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > I was needing to get some new tires for some new wider wheelsets and
    > replacements on worn tires and was wondering how wide of 700C tires
    > would fit on 70s and 80s vintage road bikes having horizontal dropouts.
    > i.e. 35 or 37 or 38 or 40.
    >
    > --
    > meb


    For what it's worth, the widest I can fit on my '75 Peugeot PX-10 is a
    32, and then just barely. I maybe could have done a 35 in the rear,
    but the 32 had no additional clearance under the fork crown.

    Remember also that if you slide the wheel back all the way in the
    dropout, your shifting may suffer as well. Unless you're one of those
    freaks who defile classic frames by riding a fixed gear trying to look
    like a hipster. That only gains you the BikeSnobNYC Seal Of
    Disapproval.

    http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/
     
  4. "Hank" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]m...
    > On May 28, 10:02 am, meb <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> I was needing to get some new tires for some new wider wheelsets and
    >> replacements on worn tires and was wondering how wide of 700C tires
    >> would fit on 70s and 80s vintage road bikes having horizontal dropouts.
    >> i.e. 35 or 37 or 38 or 40.
    >>
    >> --
    >> meb

    >
    > For what it's worth, the widest I can fit on my '75 Peugeot PX-10 is a
    > 32, and then just barely. I maybe could have done a 35 in the rear,
    > but the 32 had no additional clearance under the fork crown.
    >
    > Remember also that if you slide the wheel back all the way in the
    > dropout, your shifting may suffer as well. Unless you're one of those
    > freaks who defile classic frames by riding a fixed gear trying to look
    > like a hipster. That only gains you the BikeSnobNYC Seal Of
    > Disapproval.
    >
    > http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/


    I tried a 35 cyclocross tire in my 76 Centurian and had couldn't get it to
    clear my fenders. Went to a 32mm Panasonic road tire and the narrower tire
    with finer tread worked. Still have to deflate the tire to get it out.
    Usually not a problem cause the only reason to get it out is when it's
    already flat. Kind of irritating to pump it up, attempt to reinstall,
    deflate, install, then fully inflate after it's back in the bike.

    Are you a BikeSnobNYC if you use a single-speed freewheel? It's really flat
    around here and I never used the extra gears.

    BRM
     
  5. Hank

    Hank Guest

    On May 28, 8:14 pm, "Bruce Morrical" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Are you a BikeSnobNYC if you use a single-speed freewheel? It's really flat
    > around here and I never used the extra gears.


    There's only one BSNYC, and he definitely doesn't do a single-speed
    anything. Read his blog, it's awesome.
     
  6. landotter

    landotter Guest

    On May 28, 12:02 pm, meb <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > I was needing to get some new tires for some new wider wheelsets and
    > replacements on worn tires and was wondering how wide of 700C tires
    > would fit on 70s and 80s vintage road bikes having horizontal dropouts.
    > i.e. 35 or 37 or 38 or 40.


    Depends on the bike, really. Cool thing is that the clearances are far
    more reasonable than modern road bikes, mainly due to the sane brake
    calipers. My Redline has such "normal" reach brakes like the old bikes
    and 32mm tires look "just right" as do 28s, but even 40s will just
    clear them. The limits are like Joseph mentioned, things like the fork
    crown for one, with my old Viscount it was the uncrimped chainstays in
    the rear limiting things a bit. Being able to run 28-32s on a road
    bike with fenders is plenty to be thankful for.

    ***

    Speaking of "normal reach brakes"....Nashbar's got a fancy Redline R77
    roadie frame with carbon bits and room for normal brakes and 32s right
    now if anyone needs such a thing. Would be a sweet thing to build for
    a clyde wanting a modern looking steed without silly skinny tires.
    Yes, it has eyelets.

    http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/500/RL-R77-NCL-SIDE-FORK.jpg
     
  7. On May 28, 4:26 pm, Hank <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For what it's worth, the widest I can fit on my '75 Peugeot PX-10 is a
    > 32, and then just barely. I maybe could have done a 35 in the rear,
    > but the 32 had no additional clearance under the fork crown.
    >
    > Remember also that if you slide the wheel back all the way in the
    > dropout, your shifting may suffer as well. Unless you're one of those
    > freaks who defile classic frames by riding a fixed gear trying to look
    > like a hipster. That only gains you the BikeSnobNYC Seal Of
    > Disapproval.
    >
    > http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/


    In my opinion, you only defile a classic frame
    if you're one of those tweaks who files off the
    braze-ons. Otherwise, bikes are for riding,
    not idolizing.

    I didn't realize that people riding fixed gears
    were trying to _look_ like hipsters rather than
    just be hipsters. That makes it sound like there
    are genuine hipsters, and fake hipsters riding
    fixed gears. I've never heard of the concept of
    a genuine hipster before.

    Ben
    I'm posing as a poseur.
     
  8. meb

    meb New Member

    Joined:
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    My wide 700c wheels are unused Nexus 4 (it is a set and has my only wide 700 front) and Nexus 8 hubbed wheels.

    I have a 700x28 on a Raleigh Grand Prix, it looks as if that frame should handle a 35, maybe a 37/38, doubtful on a 40. I'm defiling this one by switching to ape handlebars, bannana seat, and sissy bar into a tall Stingray/Spyder genre bike. The Nexus 4 is one of the microprocessor automatics so I have wide bounds to my defiling.

    My Peugot originally had 27x1, now has a 27x 1 1/4, and briefly had 27x1 3/8. Looks like it would handle 700x40.

    The first two mentioned are rotated with a mountain bike and recumbent for my commute, I'll probably rotate in an ebike when temps approach 90.

    My Schwinn Super Sport currently has 27x 1 1/8, looks like it's close on getting a 27x 1 3/8.

    My Technium currently has 27x1, my Varsity has 27x 1/8, my Nishiki Linear has a 700x23 tubular disc (650C front)-no thoughts on widening rear selections for the Varsity or Nishiki.

    I think I'll buy 1 set in a 700x37/38 and see if they fit-if not, I have more room to play up front so I could mount the wide tires up front. I also have been intending to try a Shockster on a road bike, so that would also give large clearance-although I viewed the Shockster as an alternative to wide tires rather than a wide tire enabler. The wide rears have hub brakes so they would work on my mountain bikes or possibly a 26 inch sized rear recumbent.

    I have a fixie tandem monkey bike (factory that way), and I have a couple of 3/32 track cogs, but am not a regular fixie.
     
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