Wife's sticker shock



BikeBloke

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Aug 25, 2006
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DMF said:
Think a health club membership can be had for $8/week?
Especially ones that let you keep a top-notch road bike as part of the deal! Not many!

Back to the OP's situation...

Sometimes it can be easier to let your friends do the 'persuading' for you. It's simple... you tell your friends to come along for a ride, but stop at home for refreshments at the end of the journey. The trick is to brief your friends prior to meeting your wife and get them to make comment to your wife that if you had a bike of equal standard as the rest of the group, then you'd be able to keep up with the group when riding (assuming they have the type of bike you desire). Furthermore, get your 'ambassador' buddy to mention the fact that his wife had no objections to him spending the money on his own recreational pastime. If you can get someone to do the talking, it might be more acceptable to your wife if it comes from a 3rd party. Maybe, maybe not, but it's worth a try.

I think that if you're an active rider who does a reasonable amount of miles per week / month, then you may have a strong case to get what you want. If you don't ride much due to time constraints / conflicts with other commitments (eg time spent with wife & kids) or even unsuitable weather conditions, then it's not going to be easy to convince your wife that a premium bike purchase will be justified. This is pretty much the situation I'm in now, as my current bike is 'good enough' for my style of riding & the amount of riding I do, despite the fact that I was lusting for a nice BIANCHI (purely for sentimental reasons like a Bimota or Lamborghini, except the Bianchi was at least 'affordable'). Anyway, so I never did get the Bianchi, and my current bike isn't too bad. With a set of Continental Gator Skin tyres and a simple strategy to improve my stamina, I'm probably going as fast on my Giant CRX (FCR equivalent) as a Bianchi anyway. And the Giant's riding position is probably a bit more comfy too.
 

miketk949

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Jun 9, 2005
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My advice is both easier and harder - get her to ride:)

Last winter, I showed my wife an article about a bike tour through France, and told her I'd always wanted to do something like that - to my surprise, she replied that if it meant a trip to Europe, she'd be willing to start riding. Despite it being Feb, this led to a quick trip to the LBS and a Trek Pilot and shoes, shorts, etc. for her. I was afraid she wouldn't really ride, but she found a group of local women to ride with, and she's got almost 2k miles in this year. She can now do all of the local group rides, which makes it much easier to do a century or other long ride together, rather than leaving her home while I ride.

I no longer have any problem justifying my bike budget, and she understands why I lust after certain items - it just needs to include her as well. We now have an entire cabinet set up for our shoes, clothes, bottles, etc., rather than my gear being stuffed in cubbies around the basement.

The best thing is we can ride together, and encourage each other when we ride separately - and we've both lost weight and feel better. The only downside - it doubles your bike budget! We're now looking through the travel brochures to pick a trip to Europe in 07!
 

jayb828

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Oct 2, 2006
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First post here! But I couldnt help but notice how funny spouses can be. Let me give you an example.

I was once an avid MTB rider about 10 years ago and just stopped riding after I joined the Navy. Recently, I suggested to my wife that we should get into cycling since she was complaining that we didnt have a hobbie that we could enjoy together. I mentioned the fact that we would each have to spend at least 400-700 on an entry level bike. Boy did she flip out! She was convinced that a wal-mart bike... ugh! would be just fine. Anyhow, I had to let her see for herself and she bought a $54 NEXT hybrid... (talk about junk!), And since she got a bike for $54 I had buy a crapola bike too. Well after a week of riding she realized the error in her ways when she rode our neighbors Fuji Hybrid... guess what... she went to our LBS the next day and got the same bike for $480. Now I'm stuck with a POS Walmart Mongoose MTB...
However, there is a bright side to this... after she realized the error in here ways she is allowing me to build my own bike by buying components here and ther over the winter so as to spread the cost! WooHoo!

Aint life grand?
 

Phill P

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Jul 9, 2006
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I agree that getting the other half to ride is a good way for them to understand that a decent quality bike adds to the enjoyment.

My girl friend started riding properly just over a year ago, and that was on my old (good quality) MTB, but with girlie squishy saddle and higher stem. She enjoyed riding to work and loved passing all the men! But she still wasn't convinced that a road bike was any better, and despite me being an engineer and actually knowing the facts as to what makes a bike faster she wouldn't listen (you're all nodding out there aren't you...)

Anyway when she had the idea to try racing, she decided to get a road bike, but wanted a cheap bike. I talked her into a full Ultegra bike with a cheap frame and 550s.

She has now done over 2000km on it, numerous 100km bike rides, and 1 130km bike ride, she keeps up with us guys on the flats, but doesn't have the power on the hills, but still finishes feeling fresh (yes I drop back to ride with her).

She now often says "I love my bike" and acknowledges that I was right in getting a decent bike to aid her enjoyment of the sport. She doesn't get left behind (much) and if she does its because she isn't strong enough not because of the bike.

Bikes are expensive. Yes we'd all love 7kg bikes, but for 90% of us a solid durable 9kg bike isn't going to stop you from enjoying yourself!

Get your other half into cycling (its good for both of you and your relationship), and then they will understand why you want good quality.

Another word of advice....if you enjoy sports, pick a partner who understands that and also enjoys being active, makes a huge difference to not have to argue and not be "allowed" to enjoy what you enjoy!
 

sugaken

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Mar 27, 2006
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Right now I'm trying to talk my wife into letting me buy a new pair of shoes and a new helmet (been using them for four years so they are over due replacement...) in exchange of letting her buy some nice furniture. Looks like I'm succeeding.:D

When your better half doesn't ride a bike, sometimes you have to let her have what she wants in order to get what you want... ;)

Ken
 

Unbelievably

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Mar 11, 2006
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sugaken said:
... in exchange of letting her buy some nice furniture. Looks like I'm succeeding.:D

When your better half doesn't ride a bike, sometimes you have to let her have what she wants in order to get what you want... ;)

Ken
That's funny...:rolleyes:
My wife got a Rado...:eek:
 

mikesbytes

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Apr 12, 2006
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Mmm... this thread has become a "how do I justify my expenditure" one. So heres my story.

Bike expense is justified by saving in commuting expenses, however the equation isn't quite right as the extra food I eat to cover the exercise probably eats (pun intended) away at the saving.

However what about the saving in Gym membership? Doesn't work for me, I spend $1.1k on annual membership.

So my annual bill is (approx);
Bike AU$1k
Gym AU$1.1k
Extra Food AU$1k

minus transport saving AU$1.5k

= AU$1.6k loss
 

tkehler

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Feb 25, 2004
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Frankly, acquiring a fine new bike requires a combination of honesty and lying and negotiation (just like anything in a happy marriage does).

Tell her you will exercise more and that she can spend the same amount on herself. Or say that you'll drink one bottle fine red wine less per day/week/month, whatever. The bike can be financed by the savings. Or tell her you don't want anything for Xmas. That's the honesty part.

Now for the lying. Instead of laying out 2k in one go, buy it in bits and pieces. Yep, build the bike up one or two parts at a time. That's what I did. I bought a used Titanium frame (my size of course) on Ebay, and then spent a month buying assorted parts for it. It ain't cheaper than spending it all in one day, but it can look cheaper to the wife. Especially if you act nonchalant every day when the mailman (who by now knows you by your first name and asks about the 'build' project) arrives with yet another part. Or you get home first to destroy all the cardboard boxes the parts arrive in....

Of course then I blundered, just when things were going smoothly. I bought a friend's ti mountain bike frame, and that really put the cat among the pigeons. Instead of stopping after I built my one do-everything bike (ti 'cross), I am now building a mountain bike.

Now up to that point I could justify buying one awesome bike, because I did the build, and I did it more or less frugally, online and at Ebay and Craigslist. But TWO! Two bikes meant trouble. I had to 'fib' and say that once they are both built, I will have to choose between them a'la (whimper) Sophie's Choice. (Let's just say that I'm hoping against all odds that when the second bike is built, my wife will have come to the realization that, of course, I need two bikes ... if not more.)

Of course, I showed her this bike the other day (12,000 USD) and said: 'aren't you happy I don't want THIS one, honey?'

12,000$!!!

Wild! Actually I want one! Heh
 

sogood

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Aug 24, 2006
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mikesbytes said:
So my annual bill is (approx);
Bike AU$1k
Gym AU$1.1k
Extra Food AU$1k

minus transport saving AU$1.5k

= AU$1.6k loss
Are you underestimating your transport saving? The running and depreciation cost of a car goes way above that $1.5k mark. How about your money/time saving on not waiting for public transport? How about the improved financial stream of a longer working life due to the health benefits? Surly you can make it income neutral... The wonder of Excel spreadsheet, anything can be justified.
 

mikesbytes

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Apr 12, 2006
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sogood said:
Are you underestimating your transport saving? The running and depreciation cost of a car goes way above that $1.5k mark. How about your money/time saving on not waiting for public transport? How about the improved financial stream of a longer working life due to the health benefits? Surly you can make it income neutral... The wonder of Excel spreadsheet, anything can be justified.
Train Ashfield to wherever I'm working. Stratfield, CBD, North Sydney, St Leonards, Chatswood or Mascot. North Sydney at the moment. BTW, the beast is still working.
 

dbackmtg

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Oct 9, 2005
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I wouldn't advise going against her wishes. My wife never noticed the first bike I bought. She knew I was getting it, just never noticed it when i brought it home. It hung in front of the garage directly in front of her car! She's always said she doesn't notice stuff like that. Six months later I traded that bike in and brought home another. I decided I'd test to see if she really wouldn't notice it. My old bike was gray and black and a flatbar. My new bike, gloss blue and black with drop bars. I hung the bike directly in front of her car. Three months passed by and nothing. This past week after driving in the garage I asked her if anything looked different? I physically had to point out the bike. She went balistic. (sp) I explained that I traded my old bike and the new one only cost me a few beans, but it didn't matter. How could I be such a sneak she stated. It isn't worth the hassle. How am I ever going to bring up the new MTB I want?
 

Ny Cykel

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Aug 16, 2006
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Wife wants to spend $,,,, Push her to do it, if you fight her she will spend more.

Been married 30 years, I know.
 

bikedude40k

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Nov 15, 2006
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Quite the predicamate. You can't offend your wife for obvious reasons, but not having a good bike is just as bad.

Fortunately, in this world, there are a lot of stupid people who make these problems easy. In my town, some moron sold a Look 595 for $600, an eigth of what one is worth. You have to find a moron! That is the solution.

Alternatively, if you can't find a stupid person, just buy a moderately priced bike that she will agree with on price, then blow your annual budget on components without telling her. E.g, get a Cannondale R1000 frame for $500, then get DuraAce for near $1,000, syriums for $200 each, speedplays for $100, carbon handlebars for a lot of money, carbon bottle cages for $30, $50 a peice on Vittoria tires, and $150 on an awesome saddle.

Now, without your wife knowing the difference, you just got a $2,400 bike for what your wife thinks is $500, that is, until she finds out a month or so later and bitches at you for the rest of your life, but at least you'll be happy for a while...