Wind farm industry in jeopardy due to financial demands of National Grid

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Allan Gould, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. Allan Gould

    Allan Gould Guest

    Wind farm industry in jeopardy due to financial demands of National Grid

    Wind farm developers in Scotland are having to cancel future projects
    because National Grid is demanding millions of pounds in guarantees for
    electricity grid upgrades, while capacity is so limited that the queue
    for grid connections is now 10 years long.

    http://www.sundayherald.com/53638

    (Sunday Herald is part of the Newsquest Group. tgo is also part of the
    Newsquest group)
     
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  2. Another Dave

    Another Dave Guest

    Allan Gould wrote:
    > Wind farm industry in jeopardy


    Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.

    Another Dave
     
  3. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > Allan Gould wrote:
    > > Wind farm industry in jeopardy

    >
    > Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    > favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >

    Useless?? I think not.

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  4. In message <[email protected]>, Fran
    <[email protected]> writes
    >[email protected] said...
    >> Allan Gould wrote:
    >> > Wind farm industry in jeopardy

    >>
    >> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >>

    >Useless?? I think not.
    >

    The Germans have concluded so and stopped erecting anymore.

    --
    Martin Richardson
    272/284 Munros - 4% to go 34/34 'Furths'- 0% to go
    56/89 Donalds - 37% to go 494/1554 Marilyns - 68% to go
    376/525 Hewitts - 28% to go (E=178/178; W=137/137; I=61/211)
     
  5. Richard Webb

    Richard Webb Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:49:21 +0000, Another Dave <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Allan Gould wrote:
    >> Wind farm industry in jeopardy

    >
    >Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.


    Sadly the other useless eyesores, roads and sitka are harder to avoid.
    Most hills with windmills are honestly improved by them

    Black Law and Soutra anyone???? Quality landscapes.

    Richard Webb
     
  6. Richard Webb

    Richard Webb Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 00:33:55 +0000, Martin Richardson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In message <[email protected]>, Fran
    ><[email protected]> writes
    >>[email protected] said...
    >>> Allan Gould wrote:
    >>> > Wind farm industry in jeopardy
    >>>
    >>> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >>> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >>>

    >>Useless?? I think not.


    Of course you are happy to have a reprocessing plant in your back
    yard?

    Face facts. Use energy - you pay! All generators have a cost, some
    cost more than changing a flat piece of sitka wood into a flat piece
    of sitka wood with some windmills, some less, but get real, it costs
    and some folk are always going to get upset, perhaps today is your
    turn.

    Who remembers Benula Lodge?
    Easy access to Benbeoch?
    Sticky boots at the base of Pembroke climbs?
    Windy Standard with just a trig?


    Richard Webb
     
  7. Craven

    Craven Guest

    "Fran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] said...
    >> Allan Gould wrote:
    >> > Wind farm industry in jeopardy

    >>
    >> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >>

    > Useless?? I think not.


    Lets stick them in your backyard then!
     
  8. On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:49:21 +0000, Another Dave <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    |Allan Gould wrote:
    |> Wind farm industry in jeopardy
    |
    |Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    |favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.

    I rather like the look of modern wind farms. I have diverted several
    times to get a good view of them, both in the Netherlands and the UK to
    view one. I would never divert to avoid one.

    That is apart from the environmental advantages of wind energy.
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
    17,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.net
    For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
     
  9. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > >>> > Wind farm industry in jeopardy
    > >>>
    > >>> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    > >>> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    > >>>
    > >>Useless?? I think not.

    >
    > Of course you are happy to have a reprocessing plant in your back
    > yard?
    >

    Yes. I voted in favour of the plans for a windfarm in my area which
    would be clearly visible from my house.
    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  10. Nobody Here

    Nobody Here Guest

    Fran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] said...
    >> >>> > Wind farm industry in jeopardy
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >> >>> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >> >>>
    >> >>Useless?? I think not.

    >>
    >> Of course you are happy to have a reprocessing plant in your back
    >> yard?
    >>

    > Yes. I voted in favour of the plans for a windfarm in my area which
    > would be clearly visible from my house.


    I'd have no problem, either.


    --
    Nobby
     
  11. druidh

    druidh Guest

    I don't mind having a Wind Farm near me. After all, I live on the edge
    of a large town - that would make a lot of sense.
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    druidh wrote:
    > I don't mind having a Wind Farm near me. After all, I live on the edge
    > of a large town - that would make a lot of sense.


    Indeed. One on the Sidlaws and one in the middle of the Monadhliath are
    two rather different propositions, and things like the latter seemed
    mainly to be progressing because windfarms have been the Taxbreak du
    jour, rather than any given one necessarily makes Good Sense.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. >>Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >>favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.

    >
    > Sadly the other useless eyesores, roads and sitka are harder to avoid.
    > Most hills with windmills are honestly improved by them


    Reminds me of the view across Pegwell Bay of the Richborough power station.
    (Allegedly) had it's cooling towers stretched slightly to complement the
    landscape (flat). IMHO it's worked quite well, particularly nice at
    sunset. Still an eyesore close up tho.
     
  14. Fran wrote:

    >> Great! Best news I've heard all week. I've had to re-plan many of my
    >> favourite walks to avoid these useless eyesores.
    >>

    > Useless?? I think not.


    How about "nominal" then? Or to translate a rather quaint Welsh
    colloquialism - a gnat's piss in the sea.

    Paul
     
  15. Richard Webb

    Richard Webb Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 12:17:53 +0000, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >druidh wrote:
    >> I don't mind having a Wind Farm near me. After all, I live on the edge
    >> of a large town - that would make a lot of sense.

    >
    >Indeed. One on the Sidlaws and one in the middle of the Monadhliath are
    >two rather different propositions, and things like the latter seemed
    >mainly to be progressing because windfarms have been the Taxbreak du
    >jour, rather than any given one necessarily makes Good Sense.


    And they are getting caught out by transmission costs. Mind the
    Monadhliath is near a fast expanding city, but as you say we all know
    why Mr Haywood is in it.

    Richard Webb
     
  16. Richard Webb

    Richard Webb Guest


    >Lets stick them in your backyard then!
    >
    >

    Please do.. Will complement Cockenzie and Torness and transmission
    losses to the city would be lower.

    I like the idea of distributed generation - we could all have a power
    station in our back yard. Back to the future eh! Our old farm was the
    first place to get wired in the village, thanks to a hydroelectric
    plant down on the grade I and a bit rapids.

    Richard Webb
     
  17. Richard Webb wrote:

    > we could all have a power station in our back yard.


    Every house could be a power station but there seems to be a
    lack of vision to do it.

    Or is it that there's just too much revenue to be had from remote
    power generation, wholesale and retail

    ??

    Chris
     
  18. On 23 Jan 2006 07:26:00 -0800, "Chris Gilbert" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    |
    |Richard Webb wrote:
    |
    |> we could all have a power station in our back yard.
    |
    |Every house could be a power station but there seems to be a
    |lack of vision to do it.
    |
    |Or is it that there's just too much revenue to be had from remote
    |power generation, wholesale and retail

    No because when power stations were first built ?c1900? they were the
    cheapest and easiest way of getting power to houses, street lights,
    factories etc. Power stations in the back yard of *ordinary* houses have
    only been possible for say 10 years, and are only now becoming economically
    viable. Large country houses could have a generator thumping away in the
    stable, but it was just not viable to have a generator thumping away for
    every back-to-back An ordinary house will always need mains as a backup.
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
    17,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.net
    For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
     
  19. Dave Fawthrop wrote:

    > An ordinary house will always need mains as a backup.


    I never suggested that it wouldn't.

    I have a bit of a beef regarding domestic energy efficiency and
    generation. I do not believe that any government to-date has
    really engaged seriously with it. The technology, as you say,
    has now arrived and we should now be looking to minimise the
    domestic energy sink (rather than the domestic kitchen sink).

    Chris
     
  20. > I never suggested that it wouldn't.
    >
    > I have a bit of a beef regarding domestic energy efficiency and
    > generation. I do not believe that any government to-date has
    > really engaged seriously with it. The technology, as you say,
    > has now arrived and we should now be looking to minimise the
    > domestic energy sink (rather than the domestic kitchen sink).


    No need to wait for the government, just get to it - it's your house after
    all.
     
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