Wind-front tights! and trainer results

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David Kerber, Feb 8, 2004.

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  1. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    It's a nice winter day in RI today: about 25°F with a 10-15 mph wind out of the northwest, with
    gusts to about 25. After my ride last weekend when it was a little warmer and less windy, I decided
    I needed to get something which would block the wind from my knees and crotch without making my legs
    hot and sweaty. Enter a pair of Bellwether windfront tights, which my LBS recommended as the best
    ones for the money. Even then they aren't cheap, about $80, but they sure were nice when I tried
    them for the first time today. I did about 11 miles in abou 50 minutes, including the toughest hill
    I know of around here, and they were great. They kept my knees and thighs warm, which kept my knees
    from aching as the ride went along, and they kept my crotch from developing frost bite, too. I've
    ridden in the past with a pair of lined nylon warmup pants, and they worked well for blocking the
    wind, but didn't breathe enough, so my legs got sweaty, and they were baggy, necessitating an ankle
    band to keep them out of the chainwheels.

    The other think I discovered on this ride was that my trainer work is starting to pay off. I've been
    working on increasing my cadence for the last three works or so, doing my trainer workouts at 95 to
    100 rpm (I had been running at about 90 before that). When I got on the road today, I found that my
    comfortable cadence has gone up by about five to eight rpm. Last year I was most comfortable between
    about 80 and 85 rpm, and could burst to 95 or so without much effort. Today I was able to maintain
    around 88 to 93 relatively easily, and 100+ for short periods, allowing me to run about one gear
    lower to reduce the pressure on my knees. I can't wait for it to warm up and the roads to dry off so
    I can take off the extra clothes and the fenders, to see what kind of speeds I can maintain in good
    conditions; I hope to get my average up to around 18.5 to 19 on my normal training route (that means
    I'm doing around 20 most of the time while moving, because of the stop lights and signs).

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
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  2. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 14:44:11 -0500, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net>
    wrote:

    >The other think I discovered on this ride was that my trainer work is starting to pay off. I've
    >been working on increasing my cadence for the last three works or so, doing my trainer workouts at
    >95 to 100 rpm (I had been running at about 90 before that). When I got on the road today, I found
    >that my comfortable cadence has gone up by about five to eight rpm. Last year I was most
    >comfortable between about 80 and 85 rpm, and could burst to 95 or so without much effort. Today I
    >was able to maintain around 88 to 93 relatively easily, and 100+ for short periods, allowing me to
    >run about one gear lower to reduce the pressure on my knees. I can't wait for it to warm up and the
    >roads to dry off so I can take off the extra clothes and the fenders, to see what kind of speeds I
    >can maintain in good conditions; I hope to get my average up to around 18.5 to 19 on my normal
    >training route (that means I'm doing around 20 most of the time while moving, because of the stop
    >lights and signs).

    Interesting that you should mention using a trainer (here a stationary bike) to increase cadence
    hoping it would pay off on a ride. I've been doing the same thing, but not long enough to see the
    difference. I'm hoping to get improvement in that area too. Thanks for the post!

    -B
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Badger South <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Interesting that you should mention using a trainer (here a stationary bike) to increase cadence
    > hoping it would pay off on a ride. I've been doing the same thing, but not long enough to see the
    > difference. I'm hoping to get improvement in that area too.

    If you want to change your cadence, you need to concentrate on that. A cadence monitor will really
    help. Rollers will really help, too. If you use a resistance trainer, lower the resistance so you
    can pedal smoothly and quickly without burning out.
     
  4. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    =v= What's a wind-front tight? I ask with some interest, 'cause of all the cold wind hitting me in
    my, um, front. Numbnuttedly, <_Jym_
     
  5. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > =v= What's a wind-front tight? I ask with some interest, 'cause of all the cold wind hitting me in
    > my, um, front. Numbnuttedly, <_Jym_>

    They are tights with a tight, wind-blocking material on the front, and a more breathable material on
    the back. They do a great job of preventing numbnuts, as I found out this weekend! Also very nice on
    the knees in cold weather, but the breathable material on the back lets your legs breathe so they
    don't get soaked with sweat.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  6. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 9 Feb 2004 11:30:49 -0500,
    <[email protected]>, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> =v= What's a wind-front tight? I ask with some interest, 'cause of all the cold wind hitting me
    >> in my, um, front. Numbnuttedly, <_Jym_>
    >
    >They are tights with a tight, wind-blocking material on the front, and a more breathable material
    >on the back. They do a great job of preventing numbnuts, as I found out this weekend! Also very
    >nice on the knees in cold weather, but the breathable material on the back lets your legs breathe
    >so they don't get soaked with sweat.

    The wind breaker front can also made water repellent so they work well in the damp kinds of weather
    when rain pants would be overkill.

    M.E.C. > http://tinyurl.com/32f2u ($85 CND) Sugoi > http://tinyurl.com/24u2e ($110 USD)

    But, for the coldest weather, a patch of sheepskin stuffed in your shorts still works the best.
    --
    zk
     
  7. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    > But, for the coldest weather, a patch of sheepskin stuffed in your shorts still works the best.

    =v= Funny, you don't *look* Scottish ... <_Jym_
     
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